Behind the Breakthrough

Risking It All w/ Dale Vermillion

May 05, 2020 Industry Syndicate Episode 14
Behind the Breakthrough
Risking It All w/ Dale Vermillion
Chapters
Behind the Breakthrough
Risking It All w/ Dale Vermillion
May 05, 2020 Episode 14
Industry Syndicate

This weeks guest is Dale Vermillion. He has 36 years experience in the mortgage space and has spent the last 25 years being a leading trainer, speaker, and consultant.


When Dale was 14 years old he watched his brother take his last breath in a scuba diving accident. This left his parents heartbroken and Dale always trying to make them proud. Little did he know at the time at this painful story was going to become one of his greatest gifts. Not only did this event force him to grow up fast, but it lead to him always being hungry to achieve great things.

 

He went on to lead several mortgage company teams increasing their revenue by exponential levels. Where he learned the hard way, that when a company isn’t yours, you don’t always get the payoff you deserve. He left the corporate world and during that break he got a speaking gig. Stepping off stage he was approached by a handful of CEO’s about consulting work. This is where his company was born, Mortgage Champions.

 

Throughout the years he discovered his passion shifted from making money, to helping others breakthrough their barriers to reach new levels of success. He learned that giving back is his why and started a philanthropy group Mortgage Professionals Providing Hope.

 

My biggest take away from this episode is that the moments that cause us the most pain often lead to our greatest gifts and that we must find our why and serve from that place. It is our passions that get us through the hard times and if you want to achieve great things you have to have faith and be willing to risk it all. Join me as we breakthrough. 



*Behind the Breakthrough is an Industry Syndicate Original podcast

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Download the new Industry Syndicate mobile app:
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ⓒ 2020 Industry Syndicate podcast network



Show Notes Transcript

This weeks guest is Dale Vermillion. He has 36 years experience in the mortgage space and has spent the last 25 years being a leading trainer, speaker, and consultant.


When Dale was 14 years old he watched his brother take his last breath in a scuba diving accident. This left his parents heartbroken and Dale always trying to make them proud. Little did he know at the time at this painful story was going to become one of his greatest gifts. Not only did this event force him to grow up fast, but it lead to him always being hungry to achieve great things.

 

He went on to lead several mortgage company teams increasing their revenue by exponential levels. Where he learned the hard way, that when a company isn’t yours, you don’t always get the payoff you deserve. He left the corporate world and during that break he got a speaking gig. Stepping off stage he was approached by a handful of CEO’s about consulting work. This is where his company was born, Mortgage Champions.

 

Throughout the years he discovered his passion shifted from making money, to helping others breakthrough their barriers to reach new levels of success. He learned that giving back is his why and started a philanthropy group Mortgage Professionals Providing Hope.

 

My biggest take away from this episode is that the moments that cause us the most pain often lead to our greatest gifts and that we must find our why and serve from that place. It is our passions that get us through the hard times and if you want to achieve great things you have to have faith and be willing to risk it all. Join me as we breakthrough. 



*Behind the Breakthrough is an Industry Syndicate Original podcast

--
Want more of the best podcasts for Real Estate Agents and Mortgage Loan Officers?

Download the new Industry Syndicate mobile app:
iPhone: http://bit.ly/SyndicateApple
Android: http://bit.ly/SyndicateGoogle

--
Connect w/ Megan Anderson on social media:
Instagram
Facebook
LinkedIn 

--
 Follow the Industry Syndicate on social media:
 Instagram
Facebook
Twitter
LinkedIn

ⓒ 2020 Industry Syndicate podcast network



spk_0:   0:03
welcome Teoh behind the breakthrough with your host, Megan Anderson, the podcast where we tell the stories of today's leaders before they were leaders. The struggles doubts, fears and insecurities they had to overcome in order to reach their current level of success. Let's go ahead. Let's break through behind The breakthrough is an industry syndicate. Original podcast industry syndicate is the first podcast network for the real estate and mortgage industry. Go get the completely free industry syndicate podcast app Right now from the APP store or Google play, today's guest is jail for millions. Well, pad in tow, everything that he's achieved. But really he is an O g of the mortgage space. I really was inspired by this podcast episode. We dive into why it's so important to find our Why? Because if you don't find your why, then you're not gonna be able to work through the hard times. You are going to get burnt out when another thing, you have to be willing to risk it all. If you're not willing to risk it all, how can you expect to achieve great levels of success? And that's exactly what Dale has done throughout his story. and I know that this episode will leave you inspired and ready to take action. And also you can't be afraid of your why changing our why changes and that is OK. It's just important that we find out what it is, and we risk being able to achieve that. So join me as we go ahead and we break through. Welcome to another episode of Behind the Breakthrough. Today's guest is Dale for millions, you know. He's been in the industry for over 36 years, and he spent the last 25 years being being a leading trainer, speaker and consultant in this financial world. And also he has created the award winning mortgage championships selling system, and he is the founder of mortgage professionals providing hope. So thank you for being on the podcast today, Dale, and really excited.

spk_1:   2:47
Make it infinitely, asking me what an honor.

spk_0:   2:50
So let's start off with your story. I mean, you probably didn't start off in the mortgage space no one ever does. So let's kind of go before and how you kind of lead into the mortgage world.

spk_1:   3:03
So this has been story. I grew up in ah in Northern Illinois, just outside of Chicago. My parents were blue collar people, middle class, American by that was construction worker. In fact, everybody in the Vermillion family was a construction worker. So I graduate high school in 1979. Everyone to college. Um, I actually wanted to go to college and play football and my senior year of high school. I was working on the scholarship, actually had a scout from San Diego State University where I want to go to school, that I went out and met with them my junior year and broke my arm in four places. The game they came to and that kind of ended my scholarship. So that was the end of that. Yeah, but the beauty is it all worked out. Well, guy had a plan because when I graduate high school, I got into the construction business. My dad got me into that. I was working for about two years in the construction business, and I was standing on the scaffold one day and a guy said, You talk a lot, you ought to be in sales, and I don't think it was a compliment. I took him up on it. I got a job, actually, selling pots and pans door to door was the only job I could get in sales at high school. I took that job. Differ year. Within a year I went from, I was in a company of about 7300 sales people, and I had an incredible mentor, a guy that that I worked warning Tim O'Donnell, who was sensational. 23 year old guy owned the company, making a $1,000,000 back in. This is 1981 82 he put me on out one day with a guy named Dick Howard who was the number two sales person in the nation for this company. Out of 7300 salespeople. Within about a month, I was number seven in the nation using the techniques we taught me. So I learned the power off what a good mentor and coach can teach you and how use using techniques for other people really could make a difference. Well, after a year doing that, I decided I did not want to do that for a living. I couldn't see a career spanned sale, so I was looking for job and want to do something that had a leadership opportunity. I actually hocked my title on my truck to pay unemployment. Be to get an interview with a mortgage company at the time was trained. American Financial Services, which is part of the Transamerica Pyramid out in San Francisco, got the job as a loan officer manager training, um, and went to work for another great mentor gun. Instead. Williams, who taught me in one year the business inside and out. I was the number one more officer in my region of 193 branches by the end of the year, got promoted to a young branch manager age 21 Uh, ran my first branch of three loan officers did really well got promoted quickly was second branch of 10 people than the third branch of 20 people, and by almost 25 I was. I was given the opportunity to run a district of about 250 loan officers and about 400 employees in the Chicago land area. Most the beauty the mortgage business was You don't need tohave the college degree or or all of that. You just need to be good at what you do and one thing my parents instill that he was a really, really powerful work ethic to really work hard and learn from people and never think you're the smartest person in the room. Always be willing to listen to what other people have to teach you. And by the time I was in the business, about 11 years, I was running a national mortgage companies. Here's consumer financial in Chicago with about 2300 employees, no college degree and took that company in one year and quadrupled their profit in their production. Um, and that was kind of the start of it. You know, after a year of doing that, I decided that I wanted Teoh get out of the corporate world because I didn't really like the politics of corporate America, but obviously want to see in the mornings business and crazy story. Um, I took a sabbatical for three months. I'm I'm sitting at home with my wife, enjoying some time whether I get a call from a guy who says, Hey, we've got a conference we're doing in Vegas. I need a speaker. Would you come speak? And I said, I don't know if you noticed or not, But I'm not a speaker because I know you're not. But I heard you speak once at a conference as an executive. We love the things you had to say. We want you to come will pay for you and your wife to come. If you'd be willing, Teoh, and even give you a stipend, I'm like, Okay, free vacation. Three days. I'll do it. I went, I spoke, I stepped off the podium and Meghan I had five CEOs walk up and say, Hey, we'd like to hire you. And I looked at my weapons and I think we're in business. That was 20

spk_0:   7:26
five years

spk_1:   7:26
ago. So here we are today.

spk_0:   7:28
Wow. Was that kind of the star of the speaking career?

spk_1:   7:34
Yeah. That was the start of the speaking and the consulting career it launched that day. So I had one thing that I had done as an executive and a manager was I had a very I'm gonna say unique perspective on the business. And I did something I never saw anybody else do. So when I was a district manager, I would close. My office is one day, a month, every month. I would take all of my salespeople. We would go to a meeting room, so I had 10 branches in Chicagoland area. They're all within an hour of each other. We meet in a meeting room for for a day, and we would literally just exchange ideas. What's working? What's not working? What What are we seeing that successful? And I did this for the 34 years that I was a district monitor, and what it basically did was it taught me how to identify best practices of top producers and how to incorporate a selling process and system that absolutely worked well after years of doing that. When I became a training consultant, I basically took those same principles, created a training program around those, and it took me about two years. Honestly, we got to the point. We were just about broke my wife and I because we had used up all of our savings to that started this business, just kind of on a whim, was used to have in the corporate salary and all those things that come with it, And, uh, I got a call from a guy who wanted me to come. Train is people and landed my first contract, and it was literally a huge success. We tripled their numbers. He was a senior CEO in the industry. He referred me to four other CEOs and that launched my business. And before I knew what I was training the biggest, largest companies across the country and been doing that ever since.

spk_0:   9:13
That's amazing. Okay, so you got this speaking gig. You did that CEOs came up to you. Did you get back into the corporate world, or was that where you kind of went out and started doing consulting?

spk_1:   9:26
So when they approached me, they approached me, actually, as a hired consultant, a hired gun. So So basically that launched my start of my other 1,000,000 consulting at the time, which later became Morris champions, which is our training program. Um, all of that launch from that speaking engagement. And I actually had a guy that I had a chance to work with who was running a marketing company in the mortgage addition. Hey, obviously partner together, you do training. I'll do marketing. We did that for a couple of years together, and then we kind of split, and I went on my own and been doing it ever since. And you know, to date we've worked with six or 700 lenders around the country. I've trained the money mortgage professionals over that some number over that done 4000 plus speaking engagements. It's just kind of it's kind of parlayed into a great opportunity. God's has been really, really faithful on his blessed us in amazing ways, and it's just been a really a great ride.

spk_0:   10:20
Yeah, yes, you mentioned that it took about two years to kind of get it all going, dive into that kind of transition and not struggle a little bit.

spk_1:   10:33
This has been going from running a company of 2300 with the corner corporate office to, ah, bedroom upstairs, converted in stupid office by myself. That was that was a strange transition. But, you know, I think the one thing that I believe the whole time and I knew in the pit of my soul was that what I could bring two organizations could make an inherent difference. I mean, I advantage of a lot of levels, every single level I managed that I took that organization or that division or that region. Whatever it was up to the top spot and let me say something about that because that sounds egotistical and saying that I don't want it to come across that way. Let me tell you why that happened. It's not because of Dale Vermillion. It's because there's only two things I ever get. Right now, we say this in my current number. One was that I always believed that I could learn from other people, so I never, ever would not listen to other people's ideas. That was really critical. But number two, I recognized only that my success. It's not based on my successes. Leaders based on the people I put around. It's all about who you put around you. I had great success in all of my leadership roles because I just hired super talented people that were super driven, that had absolutely great work, FX and that dictated my success, and I learned from them. So once I became a consultant and speaker, I knew that I did not speak. I've never taken a speaking course. I've never been a speaker, didn't know that was gonna be the career path I would end up. Then I really started out as a consultant, thinking, OK, I've got some senior executive management leadership experienced. I can help consult the CEOs and see little executives, but quickly became man. We like the way you speak and you speak to our sales teams. You speak, you are operational teams, and I became known more as a speaker and trainer that that a consultant, Although I do all of those even today, I still consult the CEOs all over the country and chief operating officers and people in sea level in and mid level positions. But it really comes down to the people you surround yourself with is really what it comes down to. So being two years of, you know, working out of our our bedroom and trying to build a client base and, you know, just literally I was calling mortgage companies just like I've learned to do with consumers when I was a loan officer and just saying, Hey, there's what answers that I have to offer. I'd love to talk to you more about it. It took me a couple of years to ruin, build a base of business that made some money. But then once, once we had really great success with one client. It just lost amid him anymore.

spk_0:   13:07
Yeah. Did you know at the time the exact services that you were gonna provide for these companies, or was it kind of just Hey, you know, this is how I feel like I can help. And it kind of just evolved from there

spk_1:   13:24
a combination of both. So I did take the the concepts in the sales process that we used when I was a leader. And I turned that into a training program now, albeit not a great training program at the time, and it was antiquated. My wife and I still joke, you know, we've been married 28 years. We still laugh sometimes about how her and I would sit in the middle of our floor with our kids putting workbooks together for my clients. That was that was our assembly line. It was the kids putting the pages in. So it was pretty anti waited. But you know what? We had clients and we started growing. And then once it took off that then we just you know, we started to get staff and got in office and did all those things. But look, it took some patients, you know, it wasn't It wasn't like I stepped out of corporate America where I was making a really good income into this big income. I stepped into $0 coming in the door, and I knew that. But I was willing to take that risk because I felt there was an upside and think that there has been

spk_0:   14:24
Yeah, let's talk a little bit about that because I feel like a lot of people you know I have experienced. This is, well, you have fears of what if this doesn't work out, But you also have these crazy beliefs of what it can be at the same time. How do you navigate those so that the fear doesn't kind of override and keep you from taking action?

spk_1:   14:52
That's a great question. So let me tell you how that works for me, because I think we all have those fears that's human. That's normal. And actually, those fears can be turned into a very positive thing. If you can turn those into a motivation to drive you to do something bigger and better, I think for me it came down to two things. Number one Waas. I knew that in my career I had learned that if I will just put my mind of things and really work hard that those things and not give up that it pays off, it just it always pays off. And it did. Part of it was just having the tenacity to say, You know what? Even though it may be difficult, I'm in this thing. You've got to make a commitment from the start that if you're gonna do something, you know, it's the old go big or go home mindset. And, you know, unfortunately, God wired me that way. I'm just one of those guys that I never thought small ever, even as a little kid. And I always had big dreams. I was always gonna, you know, team the world, that shift I was, you know, the big Batman fan. I jump off roofs of everybody's house in the neighborhood that I would be crazy. It would jump in the bushes. So, you know, the funny thing about that is you gotta have that that commitment and that prior to say, you know what if I really believe I could do this and I'm good at this and I know it'll bring value. You gotta stay with it that that's in that process. But, you know, part of this to actually, honestly, 1,000,000 goes back to my faith. When I left the corporate world and I went into training and consulting, I really had I had an encounter with God and my faith. I had not before that that changed everything. That gave me a confidence in the hope that I never had before. And honestly, I felt that he was encouraging me, move forward on what I was doing, and I started to have a love for people and a love for helping people that I didn't have before that in my corporate years, it was all about numbers and making money. It was about just driving my people that the highest levels of performance, which I did very well. I'm a very demanding guy when I need to be and make sure that I got the best numbers out of them. And I did that because I wanted to see them be successful. There was no question about that, but there was kind of an internal spark there of Yeah, but I want to be really successful, too. When I became a speaker, that changed as my faith change because all of a sudden I was working from a different mindset of I'm not really about making the money. I'm really more about changing lives. And that just changed my entire career. And when it became about you know what I want to help companies. I want help individuals tell consumers to really get alone the right way. All kinds of doors started opening all over the place, and that's why not only by trained mortgage companies and consulted and spoke accomplices. But I've had a chance to write a book for consumers. I've done tons of national radio Fordham's cross country, because God just opened those doors to me because I was doing it for the white reason. So I think one of the great messages here is that you've got to be doing things for the right reason. If you're doing it with a money motivation, you're probably gonna fail because you're never gonna make as much as you want to, or you're not gonna make it as fast as you wish you would. I was smart enough that when I wasn't executive more. And I put some money away in case we wanted to start a business at some point. So we had a little bit of back up to step into that. But then I just had a state that said, You know what? I believe this is my calling. I believe this is what I'm supposed to dio. I'm staying with it even if I go broke doing it. And my wife agreed to it. She says, Okay, whatever you want to dio and it just worked out.

spk_0:   18:30
So you left the corporate world with the idea of opening your own business or you just left because you were tired of the corporate world?

spk_1:   18:39
Well, initially because, um, the true story a to the end of the year. My I had a contract for a year. I work for somebody who had never been in the mortgage business. Very bright individual with all these Harvard and Brown University degrees, but didn't know mortgages on your mortgage. In that year, I quadrupled their performance, and at the end of the year, when I sat down to have my discussion with my boss about my bonus, me and the guy who ran the operations team. Both of our bonuses got frozen. Believe it or not, even though we've made them. I've taken that company from a $9 million loss to a $7 million profit was $16 million net profit swing and they gave us no bonus, and I smiled and said, No problem. Then I'll take my five months severance that's in my contract, and I'm just gonna take a sabbatical and go work somewhere else. So I really was anticipating being a CEO, another mortgage company. That's really what I thought was gonna dio. And I've worked myself so hard for the last 10 years. I was just going to take a three month break with my wife. T enjoy some time before I did that. I didn't know I was gonna become a speaker and consultant. That happened because I had an opportunity to do that. And once I spoke and people seem to like that, I thought, No, I think this may be is what I should be doing.

spk_0:   19:54
Wow. Yeah, now another big thing that you talk about and it just seems like a really driving forces. Faras having that believed in being willing to take these risks is just knowing what your purpose is. And for everyone out there that maybe struggles without a little bit, how can they uncover what their purpose is? Almost pretty

spk_1:   20:20
question. Meghan, I love this. So let me share. This is this is this is a passion of mine, As you well know that, you know, it's so important that people find their purpose. You're never going to succeed without your wife. It's just not gonna happen if you're driven by things that are material. You're in trouble from the start. And it just so happened that, you know, I'll just share will be very transparently per minute about a couple of things that happen in my life that were monumental. The 1st 1 was when I was 14 years old. I actually had a 70 year old brother, Jesse, who died. I was there when it happened. He drowned in an accident and he was scuba diving, actually, a part that I worked at at the time I was there when they pulled him out of the lake on and saw him take his last breath, it was it was life changing. The same released from a. But what it did was it gave me, gave me two things. Number one was. It gave me a very clear sense of understanding of our mortality and that you know what you just need to appreciate every day you got because you have no idea when when the end is gonna come. That really was a very powerful lesson for me at a young age. It also matured me instantly. I mean, I grew up in age 14 because for the next four years, through high school, my parents they were down and out. They lost a son. It was it was brutal to them. So I kind of raised myself a lot in that time and became very mature very quickly. Because of that, we'll fast forward when I got into speaking and consulting. After carrying this work ethic and kind of a chip on my shoulder toe. Wanna prove myself that that I was worthy of the attention of not just my parents, but other people, because that was a lot of it. I built this yearning to be recognized because when you lose a sibling and there's only two of you, a lot of focus is on the sun. That's lost. And that's not a fault of my friend. Greatness are amazing people, but it's just a reality of life. So I yearned for that little bit of attention as I got to be an executive. All of a sudden, it kind of shifted into You know what? It's not about me. It's really about other people. And when that became more my purpose, that has really changed fast Board. I was a speaker for about 10 years, actually, about the time that I met Berry Hubby. But right before in that very the first time, which was probably in 2002 or three, I'm guessing is when we got toe first meet were on a thing called Close Born University. A circuit that we did together on became good friends on. Well, right before that happened right before closing university, Um, I actually went to India on a missions trip. Um, and the reason we went there was because my wife and I had been sponsoring this little groaning tear. Pattama was a four year old girl from from India, was an orphan there. We just were the church service. One Sunday we happened toe. See this presentation? We fell in love with this. This organization said, You know, we want to sponsor a child for a dollar a day. You could do them, educate them and house them all the way through college. That's a no brainer. Well, after four years of looking at her picture, I fell in love with this girl and I came down to breakfast with more Look more said, I need to meet tea room, she said, I know when you want to go, I said, I was thinking tomorrow

spk_0:   23:34
I have

spk_1:   23:34
an awesome what you like.

spk_0:   23:36
Okay, we got

spk_1:   23:39
on a plane. Include a Houston, got a visa, flew 55 hours, door to door to central India, one of the poorest places in the world. And when I got there, Meghan I met 4000 orphans. It literally I spent 12 days in the villages like I'm turning up now like it was got wrenching to me to see the poverty, to see the destitution, to see the pain and suffering. But I got to meet tea room and it changed my life like literally I left there, and the first thing I said in my wife when I got home, literally true statement walked in the door. She said I was your trip. I said, Great, honey, here's the bad news. We're so in the house. We're selling the cars that were selling our stuff and we're giving it away When we did and we bought a smaller house and we got rid of the BMW and I got a mini beheaded, nobody could believe I made the headship. And you know what? My purpose changed. My purpose went from from just helping people in a general sense, to all of a sudden, helping people in a much larger sense. And right after that we started more professional riding Hope, which has been a charity that we started in 2006 to build orphanages in India to school Children in Guatemala who live in garbage dumps. The Home House list Here in America, we we've house over 200 families who are on the street in the last two years alone. My wife does that whole time. She works with the homeless. You No way. Just found our why, like my wife when I was 20 was making money and being successful by why, when I was 30 was changing the lives of companies and individuals. My Why, when I became almost 40 Waas we're gonna change the world. We're gonna help those who can help themselves. And I will tell you it is pretty, so much joy in my work. It's created so much desire to work hard. It makes it makes the grueling times joyful because you're doing it for a purpose. So having that purpose is everything when it comes to building your success.

spk_0:   25:45
Yeah, and one important thing that I just want to point out there is that it's OK if you're why is constantly changing. And you just from like my perspective of, you know, I'm young women might like. I'm in my twenties, I'm a millennial. But I just remember the second that my why originally changed. I had a really hard time letting that old identity go, but it's so important to just kind of step into this new wine, and it leads to so many beautiful things. I mean, you've really stepped into this realm of servant leadership, and it's excelled you so much when it comes the level of success that you've been able to create for yourself

spk_1:   26:30
That you just said is so wise, Meghan, Beyond way beyond your years and that Such an awesome statement. And it's true, you know, as we grow and we start to see more of the world, we see things through a different set of lenses and in which your why is, and finally it's okay to have a why that I want to make money to provide for my family. If you're why is I just want to make money to have money. That's probably not a good watch, but that toe have money for purpose that you're you're building a family or your your single and you want to be able to build something for the future. That's a very powerful wife. And what will happen is as you start to step into that and you start to accomplish and achieve all set to be like Okay, I've done that. Now I need a new why, like you need to have that to regenerate and re excite yourself and re motivate yourself and get to a bigger purpose and a bigger purpose and a bigger purpose. And I say to people all the time, you know, people say, Oh, it's great what you guys take a look. I was just fortunate would put me in a great position where I could do the things I do. I know people who are helping one family, and I've got more stuck for them than the things I've done in my life by far, because there why is an individual or a small group. It doesn't have to be magnanimous. It's just gotta be important and it's got to be something that's meaningful to you. And if you're why is changing other people's lives, you're doing exactly what you're called to and you're gonna be very successful or not. There's no question about it. So I love what you said. You've got to be open and flexible, t really looking around yourself and saying, OK, that was my wife. Then what's my wine now? They're going to change

spk_0:   28:14
now, shifting into kind of where you're headed in the future, what are some goals that you have headed into the future and what is maybe something that is holding you back right now that you need to break through?

spk_1:   28:32
Well, good question. I think about that one, So I can tell you the first part of that question. I can tell you what that is because you know I'm getting the age. I'm almost 60. Now. I'm at a point where you know where things like retirement become riel. I'm not sure I'll ever retire. To be honest with my wife and I have talked about many times, I'm not true. That's ever gonna happen. Um, I think I will semi retire way live in Florida. We have a place in North Carolina that I love to spend time that so I could certainly see spending more time at that. But back to the matter is I always want to be doing things that are Phillips Stop Tropic that our entrepreneurial that I love speaking. I love I love influencing and impacting. I love doing things to help out. So I will always do something. I think I'm just gonna let kind of the world dictate that. And what I mean by that is that I'm not I'm not giving up on anything, but I'm just gonna look and see, ok? Where can I be best used at the different stages of my life Doesn't get older, you know, you don't ever want to be that guy in my role that is no longer relevant. When you're no longer relevant, you shouldn't be doing that anymore. But I think there's always a relevancy whether that's serving on boards. I served on a board for the orphans that I talked about. Now, I literally just took on that role this year. I've avoided boards for many years. I was on a bunch of board when I was younger, and I decided this is what I want to be committed to. So that's one of the things I might be doing it more time on that, traveling more Hopefully when all this ban is lifted and everything where I can do more work overseas with these Children that we served in Guatemala and Africa and in Indian all these different places. So that's really where I see my career going. Probably doing, you know, continued speaking engagements at conferences in those kinds of things. But a lot less of what I do have done in the past in really training and being kind of front line. I want to be more kind of back side of that, Um, as far as what's keeping you from those things? I think the biggest thing is I just adore my wife. So I really want to hang around with her a lot.

spk_0:   30:31
And

spk_1:   30:32
I think that you got to kick me out the door to go to work, like, Okay, that's enough.

spk_0:   30:36
Go away. I'm

spk_1:   30:36
like, OK, I get that. Well, you know,

spk_0:   30:38
after

spk_1:   30:39
almost 30 years of marriage, you just you know, you settle into a place where you love being on each other. But you do need those times. Did you? By yourself? I'm kind of the kind that I love hanging around all the time. Cheesy kind like No, no

spk_0:   30:49
time to go. You should forget about money. I have another question, Toso. When your brother passed away, you mentioned how you shifted into, and rightfully so. You know, you shifted into the space of wanting attention at the time, it was from your parents, and I think that shifted throughout your career to growing things and building things and achieving things and stepping into those leadership rules. Which is great because another thing that I have found for the use of these podcasts and talking to people like yourself is But it's oftentimes the things that are the hardest in life that bring us the most pain. They also bring us the most gifts. And I'm curious, as you talk about kind of slowing down life a little bit, spending more time traveling, spending more time with your wife and your family. Is there any part of that little self that kind of pops back up and still wants that that role of people giving you attention and finding you relevant and all of that,

spk_1:   31:59
why be lying through my teeth if I said anything different, but that absolutely I mean, you know, as human beings, we we want to be known. We want to know we matter. I share this story a lot. So I told you about when I went to India the first time when I didn't tell you was a part of the story that was significantly important in my life and what it waas was when I got to the orphanage and I've never been there before. They told me to get out of the car and walked to the front of the car and turned the corner, and I'm like, Why? They said you'll see when you do it, so that out of the car I turned the corner. When I turned the corner, I looked down the street and the 4000 Children were lined up 2000 and each side of the road for 1/4 mile. No exaggeration. All these little kids dressed in the blue out that singing and dancing and shooting fireworks and throwing flower petals as agreement. So I didn't know I was totally overwhelmed. Didn't know what to do. So I decided I'm going to just say hi to every child. So I walked up to the very first time about a five year old boy, and I said, You know, walked up, give a hog, head him on the head and he looked me dead. Man's uncle, Uncle, What's my name? And I was kind of freaked out. I didn't I didn't We spoke English. Well, he didn't. This is the only words he knew in

spk_0:   33:11
English. And I

spk_1:   33:12
said, I don't know what your name he said, Roger. And I said, Nice to meet you. Raj and his eyes lit up his face, lit up his body, changing everything, and I'm like that was interesting next child. Same questions. Same response. Third shot, same questions, same response. Five kids in a row by my look at the transverse. Okay, you gotta help me out here. Why are they asked me that? He said. Here's the reason why they're orphans who have no identity. Their parents have either died or have given them up because they can't afford to raise them. They want you to say their name because they want to know they matter to you. I was sobbing instantly the minute he told

spk_0:   33:49
me that I

spk_1:   33:50
I lost and literally lost it because I was 40 years old. I never realized how much people need to be known. We all need to be. No. So, yes, there are still a side of me that I want to be the Kino headline guy speaking on the stage. I want to do bigger and better all the time, But there's also a humble side that I hope that I have that says, you know what, but that's God's plan, not mine. And if that isn't my future, it's OK. I'm OK being in the background. I like the front light. I'm sure Barry, I'm your Huckleberry I'm sure buries the same way. That's that's our DNA. When you're a speaker, that's your Vienna, and then you want to be first and foremost in front line and you want to be in the trenches, you'll be doing that. It's you know what? Sometimes we also have to realize there is a time for that and there is a time to take the back seat and let the next generation come up and do that. And what I'm trying to dedicate my final years to in this business is really encouraging and mentoring that younger generation to take the place of the Berry Habib's and the day over millions on the Todd Duncan's and the list goes on of people in our industry or doing that and really just try to take more of a humble stance on that. Now, will I do it? Well, I don't really

spk_0:   35:05
know. Not

spk_1:   35:06
there yet, but I do my best.

spk_0:   35:09
Well, I'll just say that you do have a very humble side to you in everything in every story that you've talked about today, so I think you're going to do a great job at it. So come in front of you. I appreciate you and I appreciate you coming on here now for anyone that wants to find out more about you. Where should they go?

spk_1:   35:34
Over a 1,000,000 dot com. That probably the easiest thing to do. We're going to mortgage champions dot com, but probably just easiest. Just type my name and it'll pop up. You'll see it. And, uh, you know, we love love to partner with you

spk_0:   35:46
and I'll put him in the show notes as well, everybody. But they do have one more question for you and that ISS for everyone listening, that is maybe going through their own struggles, their own hardship, their own pain. What are some words of wisdom that you want to leave them with, ultimately help them break through?

spk_1:   36:09
Well, you are very good at this, So thank you for these great questions. So I'll give you a couple of those couple answers to that. First off, you got recognized. You don't control the universe. That's God's job. To me, that was a turning point in my life. When I recognize one day I don't control everything around me, I need to give the universe back to the guy who created it. And I just need to do the best I can within what I've got in front of me. It's that, you know, don't try to control what you can't and focus on the things you can. I think that's number one. I think number two is Always remember the old saying This too shall pass. Because if there's one thing I've learned in 58 years of life is you're gonna have ebbs and flows, you're gonna have good times. You're gonna have bad times. And you said it very well earlier. We learn the most from our tough times, you know, sometimes, Ah, chip on your shoulders. Actually, a really good thing, a really good motivator. So pain can really do that to you and actually teach you how to be better at the things in life. So remind yourself this too shall pass and and just focus on what matters. I think that's the most important thing is no matter where you're at, we can always help other people. That's what we're designing for. That's a worm made for you know, e I mention it when we had the earlier I think today on Facebook live with you and bury that. You know, my whole life is built around one burst out of Philippians that says, do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit

spk_0:   37:39
but in all things with humility. Value others above yourself, looking out for their inches, not drone. It reminds me that my role is to help others not help myself if we can just remember those three things I think that's really gonna help encourage people to be able to get to anything they're dealing with because we don't control it all. Don't even try to because it's beautiful. Well, I love it. Thank you for your time today. And thank you, everyone that took time to listen to this. Tiu, you are making a big difference to the rest of you after you're all making a big difference, Meghan. Thank you. What you're doing is awesome. Keeping up God bless you.