City of Plantation Podcast

Episode 34 - Summer Sports Injuries and Care

July 30, 2021 City of Plantation Episode 34
City of Plantation Podcast
Episode 34 - Summer Sports Injuries and Care
Show Notes Transcript

Thank you for listening to the City of Plantation's Podcast. In this episode, we are excited to have Dr. Clive Woods in the studio, a Board Certified Foot and Ankle surgeon. We'll be discussing common summertime injuries as well as injury prevention and care. This Podcast is aimed at keeping the residents of Plantation informed of events and important information happening throughout our city. Please subscribe to this podcast, as we will be producing new episodes regularly. 

Hosts: Cary Blanchard and Ezra Lubow
Guest: Dr. Clive Woods, Surgeon
Music: Oakwood Station via Epidemic Sound
Artwork: City of Plantation 

Speaker 1:

Welcome to the city of plantations podcast. I am Carrie Blanchard, battalion chief of public affairs for the plantation fire department. Thank you for tuning in our podcast is designed to keep you up to date on all the latest happenings and activities in about and around the city of plantation on our episodes. We talked directly with the leaders decision makers and the movers and shakers we'll make plantation the great city that it is.

Speaker 2:

Welcome back to another episode of the city of plantation podcast. Carrie and I are excited to have in the studio with us today, Dr. Clive woods, a board certified foot and ankle surgery. Dr. Woods specializes in foot and ankle conditions and is skilled in treating these conditions stemming from arthritis and sports injuries. His expertise though extends beyond just foot and ankle care to care for fractures, for hips, arms, and legs. He believes in developing a collaborative care plan, including family members and other members of the healthcare team. Every patient has different needs. And Dr. Woods tries to address those needs as best as possible with the summer season in full swing. A lot of people are out playing sports and outdoors and kids are out with their families and parents. So we know that you're going to talk to us about some tips for injury prevention. Talk about what sports are high-impact on the lower extremities, how to prevent soreness and talk about some stretching exercises. Perfect. So welcome. Thank you for having absolutely.

Speaker 1:

Thank you, Dr. Woods. We appreciate you being here. Um, I guess let's start with what are common injuries that people have in now, again with summertime being here and people being outdoors and playing, what are the kind of injuries that you see most common? So

Speaker 3:

The most common injury that I see as a foot and ankle surgeon is one Achilles injuries. And in addition to that cath , uh , injuries. So what ends up happening a lot of time in the summer? Uh , it's a little hotter. People are dehydrated people, aren't stretching, they go out, they play tennis, basketball. And one of the more common sports that is , uh , up and coming is pickleball. So I'll have them come in and, you know, they're, they've been playing for 20, 30 minutes and while they're getting towards the end, they go for that stretch and all of a sudden the feel of pop or, you know, they feel like something hit them in the back of the way .

Speaker 1:

What are the things that somebody can do to prevent these injuries?

Speaker 3:

One of the things that I always tell people is stretching is huge because what ends up happening, if you don't stretch, what you're trying to do with the muscle is when you contract the muscle with shortens, however, while you're doing the movement, while the muscle is trying to contract and shorten, you're stretching it out. So the more flexible that muscle is, the less likely it's going to tear or rupture, same way like a rubber band. If you take a rubber band and all of a sudden, quickly try to stretch it out, the rubber band is going to pop. So our muscles tendons kind of act the same

Speaker 2:

Way. So we hear a lot of , uh, we hear a lot of conversation, both ways that you shouldn't stretch when your muscles are cold or you should stretch when they're cold and not when they're hot, what's your recommendation on the appropriate time to stretch ,

Speaker 3:

Uh, the most appropriate time. So let's say I have , um, people all the time do walking, they'll walk two, three miles. A lot of times, what I will tell them is if you're around the house or, or even if you're walking around the like central park, you will just walk for a little bit, warm up the muscles, nothing vigorous, just kind of loosen up a little bit. Then I would stretch , um , because the warmer your muscles are the easier it is to stretch. So I would definitely do just a little warmup . You don't have to, you know, breathe heavy, do any kind of running just a little walk in , warming up,

Speaker 2:

Get the blood circulating. Correct. Okay. And how long should somebody stretch for

Speaker 3:

Depends on, on activity . So what I mean by that is if you're using an activity that is incorporating both the lower extremities and upper extremities, most of the times , it's only a few minutes, five minutes is , is good enough. Uh , most of the stretches are, let's say you stretch your Achilles, each stretch you're holding for about 30 seconds. So if you're doing five, six stretches, that's going to give you about three

Speaker 2:

To five minutes. We see a lot of people when they're stretching, they tend to , to bounce. Is that advised. I've heard kind of conflicting information on that as well.

Speaker 3:

I'm not a big into the bouncing out like a nice, slow stretch. Um, so like even for myself. So when I work out , um, before I work out , a lot of people like to get on the treadmill and just run normally what I do as a dynamic stretch. So I will like get a mat and work on stretching. My hips slowly, work on stretching my Achilles. And just in general, it helps , uh, not only for the activity, but overall in life , uh, to be a little bit more flexible to prevent injuries. Excellent.

Speaker 1:

Beyond the prevention. That's just say you're working out in , or doing some kind of sports. What are ways or things that we can do to prevent soreness? I know that's a problem. So people take on a sport or a activity, then they get sore and then they stop. But the idea is for people to take on exercise as a way of life. So how can we prevent soreness? So

Speaker 3:

The , the biggest thing, and it's funny that you say that because when I work out, my trainer was telling me like, you're never sore. Uh, so one of the, it depends on the activity. So let's say, you know, you did some running , uh, one of the ways you kind of can help with the soreness, because what happens is when you're running or doing the activity, everything's warm, everything's loose. But at the same time , uh , inflammatory response, meaning inflammation in the body is kinda going. And so now when you go and you lay down and next thing you know, you wake up, everything's stiff, everything's sore. One of the best things is to do your activity after you do activity, depending on, on what normally sore icing is very good. Uh, so putting ice on there , 15 to 20 minutes, taking it off for 15, 20 minutes, putting it back on that helps tremendously. In addition, sometimes what I do is I like to do , uh , like though some Epson salt in a bath, and that actually helps like my recovery, you know, major.

Speaker 2:

Okay. How's that work by the way. I mean , I don't want to get too scientific in the deep dark quite

Speaker 3:

So. I mean, from the standpoint of the Epson salt. So , uh, it's funny because I always think about the concept this way. It's like when you were in, you know, great school and you had the, the bag with the Berry and what I mean by that is you got Kool-Aid on one side and you have water on the other side, and then there's a membrane. So , uh, let's say a barrier with not wide open channel, but you have little holes in it. What usually is going to happen is the area that's more concentrated, meaning the area with the Kool-Aid is going to, or whatever, kind of, you know , drink that's red is going to try and move over to the water area. And that kind of, you know, you kind of see that happen. So , um, the concept is, you know, from the standpoint of inflammation, if you're using a more concentrated bath with salt, kind of pulls out that inflammation.

Speaker 2:

Very good. Very good. So what are some tips as we're out and we're more active, beyond stretching? What are some more tips for injury avoidance? Uh ,

Speaker 3:

So one of the biggest thing that I would tell you, especially in south Florida, hydration , um, so drinking water from your recovery drinks, whether it's Gatorade, Powerade , um, you know, making sure your electrolytes are, are balanced because a lot of times you can get cramps in your calf or, you know, in your feet if

Speaker 2:

You're not hydrated properly. Okay.

Speaker 1:

So one of the questions, like what are signs and symptoms that something might be wrong? I know that you had mentioned earlier, like a snap, like usually, you know, that's pretty evident that something may be wrong if , if you can't, there's serious pain, but there's other things that can go wrong that you might ignore or whatever. What are some signs and symptoms I went in to look

Speaker 3:

Out for? So one of the, so one of the things that can , uh, tell you something's going wrong. So let's say you're playing a sport. If you feel like your leg is tighten up. Uh , so sometimes people are playing tennis and it's like, ah, my, my calf is tightened up. They'll go in , they'll stretch. Um, that's a little bit of a symptom that's telling you that if you keep going, that injury may occur. Um, in addition to that , um, other things that can happen is as far as soreness. Um, so if someone has inflammation , uh, so let's say you do some running and or some walking and next day you're sore. Um, usually I would tell you that is sort of a factor that tells you, instead of walking every single day, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, how about we take a rest on Tuesday and then try and get back at all on Wednesday. So sometimes just any symptom that you feel, whether it's soreness or muscle legs , letting your body recover,

Speaker 1:

And when should somebody consider seeing a specialist?

Speaker 3:

Uh , so normally what I tell people is if you have pain, let's say Monday, you did an activity and it's starting to bother you. You go home, you ice. It, you do some, you know, whether it's anti-inflammatories, whatever medication you have and it continues to bother you after a few days or even a week, then I would definitely come in .

Speaker 2:

Right. Quick question on , um, on icing. So another area where there are typically some conflicting pieces of advice, better to ice, better to heat alternate between the two what's your recommendation. So

Speaker 3:

Depends on the area and the injury. So normally the way I kind of think about it is if you have, let's say you've gone out and you've run walk. Usually when you're done, you want to ice. Cause that gets rid of the inflammation. Now let's say you have someone with, they have low back pain and their back is stiff. Usually warming. The backup helps with, you know, the mobility and loosening that up. So , uh , another way I kind of think about it is working out when you work out. First thing you do is warm up, which is, you know, moving around, warm it up stretch, then you work out and then when you're done, you cool

Speaker 2:

Down. Okay. Got it. Yeah. That's very good. Good advice. So Dr. Wood , I , uh, I injured myself , uh , knee, elbow, leg foot, and I'm starting the process of maybe going through my primary and then going to see a specialist typically, what are the treatment options and what varying levels of treatment options are there for those typical sports injuries that the majority of lay people are going to experience.

Speaker 3:

Okay. Yeah. So usually what ends up happening is let's say you make your appointment. What does a typical office visit look like when you come in? Uh, usually my medical, assistant's gonna come in, discuss with you , uh, what you're there for, whether it's your foot, your knee , uh, after that, depending on the body part, we get x-rays x-rays can tell you a lot, whether, you know, let's say you have a fracture, you have some arthritis, or maybe even something that you were congenitally born with may , uh , lead to pain or injury after that is done. I come in, I get a history and examine you depending on what we find and how long it's going on, or even the history. Like if you said, Hey, I fell and I think it's a fracture. Usually that's going to show up on x-ray depending on what I find , uh , dictates where we go. So if someone strain their shoulder a lot of time, that's going to be a little bit arrests, info anti-inflammatory and therapy, trying to stretch it, exercise it , uh, get it back to functioning. Uh, of course there is going to be a time period where you have to lay off of whatever activity you're doing. Um, other injuries, let's say if someone fell and broke their ankle, that may be something will require surgery, where I have to go in there and fix that to prevent any chronic issues such as , uh, having pain, because it didn't heal correctly, having deformities, having arthritis, because it didn't heal correctly. Um, other times let's say, let's go back to the Achilles. Uh, one of the things that can happen is you can get a , what we call tendinosis, meaning the Achilles is wearing. And if you do too much on it, it starts to flare up. That may require as simple as just resting it. And sometimes you may be in a boot, which you can still walk around, but it rests anti-inflammatories and then getting your therapy to stretch it. However, sometimes that you may try that and it doesn't work. And then that's when we're , we may need to get an MRI to dive in further and possibly even , uh , discuss surgical options if it's not getting

Speaker 2:

Right. So I want to circle back real quick because I remembered a question I wanted to ask you in Florida. Obviously our weather is very nice most, all year round, so we don't really have seasons where people are indoors for six or seven months at a time , uh, holding out during the winter. But do you see people, do you see seasonal injury patterns where, you know, people get back into exercising after laying off for awhile and push it a little too hard and have some injuries. And , and if so, what's your recommendation for individuals to ease back into exercising as opposed to just jumping right

Speaker 3:

In? I , I do see seasonal injuries, but it's a little bit different in south Florida. So a typical year kind of goes like this for me, right? Probably the next month or two , uh , football starts up September. So I'm going to get all of the, you know, ankle sprains, ankle fractures, whatever fractions the kids get from football. So that usually goes from September till , uh , let's say October, November, depending on how far they go and play offs and , and things like that. The other funny thing that I get is usually around February, March, even though it's hot here, everyone's going on ski trips. Uh, so they come back with , uh , Hey, I was on the slopes and I broke my ankle. Um, so they splinted it and they came , uh, came down here. So usually around February, March, I'll kind of see those type of injuries. And then, you know, even in between that, a lot of the times now, and you know, this timeframe, a lot of people no longer do seasonal sports. It's, you know, let's say they're playing soccer, it's travel, it's recreational it's school. Uh, so sometimes I'll see those injuries throughout the one thing that I usually tell people just to get back into anything , uh, whether it's, you know, a marathon runner playing soccer, you have to , uh , work on your conditioning. If I understand, okay, I ran marathons and you're running 26 miles. You can't just jump in. And on that Friday, do your 13 miles. Uh, you have to slowly build back up , uh , one to prevent to muscles. And the other thing that can happen is sometimes you can get stress injuries, meaning that you are loading the body too quickly, whether it's the foot , um, you know, let's say, yes, the foot is used to you running 26 miles, but if you haven't done it in three, four months, and all of a sudden you try and do that, it's a , a sure way to get a fracture.

Speaker 2:

Right? And one more question that I had that a lot of people talk about there's the weather really affect a prior injury. In other words, a lot of people will say, man, it's , uh , it's cold out or it's hot out my knees acting up. Is there some truth to that?

Speaker 3:

Uh , there's definitely truth to that. So what ends up happening and , and you yourself without an injury can kind of sense that , uh, the atmosphere changes. So what ends up happening is when someone has knee arthritis , uh, you know, you always hear old grandma . I can tell you when it's gonna rain before it rains, the reason why they can tell you that is the bare metric pressure in the atmosphere changes. Uh, so that usually , um , causes a little aching of arthritic joints. Uh, in addition to that, let's say you have a injury and you have hardware in there , uh, whether it's stainless steel titanium, sometimes that can also affect

Speaker 2:

You. Excellent. Excellent.

Speaker 1:

All right . I think that kind of, we've covered a lot today, so I really appreciate you taking the time out , um, Dr. Woods again, thank you. Is there anything else that you wanted to say?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so, I mean, you know, I'm right locally in plantation, right across from , uh, uh , Westside medical center. Uh, we have a medical pavilion right in front. I'm usually in the office Monday, Wednesday, Thursdays. Uh, in addition, I have , um, other partners that are with me that do the sports medicine, joint replacements, like you said, I'd specialize , uh , in more foot and ankle injuries. So Achilles fractures, Bunyan's , uh, reconstruction of flat feet, ankle replacements. Um, so if you need us, you can get in contact with us. Our number is 9 5 4 7 2 4 3 4 0 0.

Speaker 1:

All right . Thank you very much for joining us, everyone.

Speaker 2:

Thank you, Dr. Woods. Appreciate your time. All right. Thank you for having

Speaker 1:

Me stay safe. You've been listening to the city of plantation podcast, restrict you , bring your accurate and timely information. Please continue to tune in to our podcast episodes and also catch up with us on social media, including Twitter, Facebook, and next door. If you have questions, send them to ask [email protected], and we will answer your questions directly. Thank you for taking the time to listen to our podcast and stay safe.