Turning Readers Into Writers

101 - How to develop a millionaire mindset with Carissa Andrews

April 07, 2022 Emma Dhesi Season 1 Episode 100
Turning Readers Into Writers
101 - How to develop a millionaire mindset with Carissa Andrews
Show Notes Transcript

Carissa Andrews has been publishing for over a decade now.And published her first novel at the age of 14.

Since then, she discovered 20 books to 50K and has gone on to publish over 20 books.
Using a rapid release strategy this has helped her build a back catalogue quickly and grouper income at the same time.

She has taken what she's learned over the last ten years and put it together in her rapid release road map online program for writers who are looking to grow their own back list and publish multiple books a year.

One of the big teaching blocks within her course is taking charge of your editorial calendar and being in control of your time she notices that many of us are involved in toxic productivity where we have never ending To Do List, and it always feels like we're playing catch up we create more chaos rather than tidy it up.

We talked to about the millionaire mindset, something Carissa is very keen to help authors with a loss of writers are reluctant to invest either in themselves or in their books. 
Having what's known as if poverty mindset.

Carissa is on a mission to help people shift out of that and into an abundance mindset.
Where they learn to see that they themselves are worthy of investment as human beings, but also that their books are worthy of investment.

This is a great episode for you if you are unsure of why you should continue with with long with lifelong learning for your writing many people feel that they won't see the financial return on that investment others feel that they're not worth making an investment on and these are two issues that Carissa talks into.

She challenges both the idea that you, as an individual or not worth spending money on or investing in, and she also challenges the belief that nobody can make money from being an author but does acknowledge that it won't happen overnight?

Being an author is a long term gain and only when you stick with it do you start to?
The reap both the financial and the personal rewards.

Go to Millionaireauthormindset/challenge
And you can sign up for it there.


Connect with Carissa:

International Bestselling Paranormal & Urban Fantasy Author Carissa Andrews - Carissa Andrews

Carissa Andrews's Author Revolution

www.Millionnaireauthorcoach.com/challenge

Author Revolution with Carissa Andrews | Facebook

Carissa Andrews (@CarissaAndrews) / Twitter

Affiliate Link: 

https://author-revolution-academy.mykajabi.com/a/2147508978/GG7HiL2r 






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Emma Dhesi:

Hello, I'm Emma Dhesi and welcome to another episode of turning readers into writers. If you're brand new here, welcome. And here's what you need to know. This is a community that believes you are never too old to write your first novel, no matter what you've been up to until now, if you're ready to write your book, I'm ready to help you reach the end, I focus on helping you find the time and confidence to begin your writing journey, as well as the craft and skills you need to finish the book. Each week I interview debut authors, editors and industry experts to keep you motivated, inspired, and educated on all things writing, editing, and publishing. If you want to catch up, head on over to Mr. desi.com, where you'll find a wealth of information and tools to help you get started. Before we dive in, this week's episode is brought to you by my free cheat sheet 30 top tips to find time to write. In this guide, I give you 30 ways that you can find time to write in the small gaps that appear between the various errands and tasks and responsibilities that you have in your day to day life. Now, you might be thinking that you don't have any time to spare, but I can guarantee these top tips will give you writing time you didn't think you had if you thought writing or was involved a pen and paper or a keyboard. Think again. If you thought you needed at least an hour at a time to write your manuscript. I help you reframe that you won't be disappointed. Get your free copy of 30 top tips to find time to write by going to Emma desi.com forward slash 30 Top Tips. Okay, let's dive in to today's episode, Carissa Andrews, an international best selling author with more than 15 published books. He is president of the lakes area writers Alliance, and Minnesota nonprofit dedicated to the literary arts. In addition, she's also the CEO of author revolution, and online academy with multiple courses, which has the single purpose of demystifying the indie publishing process. In her spare time, she's also the host of The Author Revolution podcast. And I really, really more than most episodes, I really, really recommend you listen to this one, whether or not you want to be an indie author, or if you want to go the traditional route. Today we talk about mindset, the millionaire mindset. And this is something that is relevant to every single writer, certainly creative, definitely, probably every single person. Now it's not that you necessarily want to become a millionaire, but it's about changing the way that you view money, and your relationship to money and what it can do for you and what it can do for the people around you. My own experience of working with writers is that there's a real fear around money. And it's seen as a dirty word, that if you're an artist, if you're a creative if you're a writer, it shouldn't be about money. But at the same time, most of the writers I come in contact with want to earn a living with their money. So it's a really complex relationship that we've got. And I am sure that today's conversation with Carissa will help you see things in a new way. And hopefully enough of a new way that you start to implement changes about how you view money and what money can do for you and the people around you. So Delvin enjoy. And of course, you can always get in touch with Carissa, if you've got more questions. I know that she'll be more than happy to answer them. Alright, enough of me. Let's get chatting to Carissa. Well, Hi, Chris. Thanks for joining me as always, it's lovely to see you.

Carissa Andrews:

Thank you so much for having me. I'm I'm so excited to be here.

Emma Dhesi:

Well, I just thought I'd start with for those who sort of don't know you, I wonder if you could tell us a little bit about your journey to writing.

Carissa Andrews:

Sure. Yeah. So for me, it was, I guess I've always been a writer to some degree. Of course, you know, being a younger adult, I was always very interested in poetry, the angsty kind, you know, I think everyone goes through that phase, especially when you're learning poetry in like middle school or in junior high, whatever. And I kind of transition though, when I was 14 into writing fiction, which was super weird. My friends were looking at me like I grew horns. I wrote my first novel when I was 14. And it all came because of a really in depth. I guess dream that to this day, I still remember it felt like more like a past life regression memory or something. And I wrote this like very fear street esque type novel, and gave it to my English teacher and she of course loved it even though the poor woman I don't even know she must have been reading it wondering what in the heck but she encouraged me she was very supportive. And for a while there, I would write, you know, short stories and a lot of different things and kind of I transitioned into graphic design for a bit. And so I kind of left the writing side, until I realized I went to school for graphic design, I became a graphic designer and I hated it. I hated it so much, because the corporate world was terrible. And my best friend was like, You know what? You've always loved writing, why aren't you like starting a blog or something, you should write a book, you know, she was she was just throwing stuff out there because I was lamenting my life at the time. And I was like, Okay, I could start a blog, you know, that I could do. And I started a blog and started writing some of the, you know, the big thoughts in my brain at the time. And it was, like, I think my first blog post was like, how the internet is the Akashic records? You know, these, these kind of deep, weird thoughts that, like, where else are you gonna put these things, I guess, a blog, why not. But once I was starting to get some of them out onto the blog, my friend was like, you know, what, you should write a story, oh, I've always wanted a love story with a ghost, that would be really cool. Or she, you know, she did all these things. And she wanted me to start writing this particular love story with a ghost. And so I think I wrote a chapter. And then I got the idea for panoramas. And so that was my first book, I ended up putting the ghost story aside, there was, I like, I have no idea if I still have that chapter. But the rest was history. I wrote pin Domus, and kind of didn't look back from that point forward. So I am now I think I have 20 books that are published. But not all of them are single titles. Some of them are box set, or compilation, omnibus editions, but I just I didn't stop reading.

Emma Dhesi:

He had a fantastic trajectory really have a real inspiration to us. And we're going to talk a little bit more about the strategy that you've used for that. And, but I wanted to just talk about what it is to be an indie author as, as opposed to being perhaps opposed to being a traditionally published author. But I think I get the feeling that mindset for and how we approach being an independent author is quite different to that as to how we approach the traditional world. And do you think having a positive approach, or even a growth mindset, some people might say is, is a is necessary, if you want to be an independent author?

Carissa Andrews:

I wouldn't say it's necessary. But I would say that if you want to have a sustainable and fulfilling career, having a growth mindset is absolutely critical. But I think if you're just, you know, like, Hey, I just want to write this book, it's fun, you know, I just enjoy the process, my husband's like this, you know, then it's like, do you have to have that kind of mindset? No, probably not. You just need to have the mindset of, I'm gonna finish this thing and throw it out there. And I don't care who the heck reads it, right. But I think if you want to earn a living, and if you want to have a career in this, and you really want to earn the royalties that come along with that, you absolutely have to have that growth mindset and realize that every book you put out there is adding up in your favor. It's it's bringing you into this realm of the authorship that not everybody actually gets to because some people will write one or two books and think, oh, it's not working for me, and then they're gonna stop. Where if you want to have a career you like, why would you stop? It's a long term, long game thing, you know, just keep going.

Emma Dhesi:

Yeah. And I think that's something a lot of people don't think about. And I have to keep reminding myself as well. I think it was Joanna pen that sort of put that idea in my head that this is not an overnight thing. Well, for most of us, it's not, and but you're in it for the long term gain. And in order to build a catalog that you've got, you've got to be consistent too, and kind of stick with it and give yourself the chance to, to succeed and do well at it. And, and what I've noticed in my own career, as well as the incomes as other side that we do think about when we're at the beginning, and just thinking about writing a book, but it's the whole kind of business side of being an author. And that I think is a big shock to people. And so being a business, there's two bits to that, or multiple bits to that. One, of course, is the creative side and actually creating the book and the product. But what are the Why have you noticed that other sort of other sides to running an author being an entrepreneur, as they call it, but certainly, you know, running a business what, what are some of the things that taken you by surprise,

Carissa Andrews:

I think the number of hats that we actually do end up wearing if you're going to be successful in the especially in the beginning. And if you don't have the, like a secondary career or a spouse who can support your dream of becoming this. It means taking on a lot of the things yourself. And so I think I counted, there's something like 20 Plus hats that we indie authors, where it's crazy, you know, because we're writing our books, we're creating the book blurbs most times, sometimes we are writing or doing our own covers. We're a social media manager. We are a newsletter guru. I mean, we've got all these things right that we have to try to figure out keyword specialist. Like who knows you're gonna have to figure out keywords when you're writing your book. Like how it's awesome All right. So I think for me, though, the thing that really slapped me upside the head was when I was like, oh my god, I'm doing all these things, and I can't do it all anymore. It's like, when it finally got to the point where it's like, there's so much to do, especially when you have more than one or two books out there, and you're starting to get the backless built. Real realizing that you have to now become a boss, you have to hire someone to help you. And hopefully that someone is good, because you want someone who can complement what you do. Someone who is able to take on the task that you don't want to do and loves doing it. And so hiring a PA was like the thing that really cracked open my mind of like, okay, this is how you're able to progress without losing your Avira loving idea. This is how you can move forward, and really expand into new areas and still keep your creativity and your wits about you.

Emma Dhesi:

Yeah, I I certainly never never envisaged myself needing to be a boss. Yeah, I think that's. And that's a scary proposition for many of us who perhaps, have not been in the corporate world and not managed a team before. It's a whole new skill level. Oh, my goodness, because? Yeah. So I'm going to return back to the your strategy that you've used to see the success that you've had, and that is one of rapid release. And I wonder if you could tell us just for those who aren't familiar with that strategy, what a rapid release. Strategy is?

Carissa Andrews:

Sure, sure. Well, if anyone's heard of 20 bucks to 50k, you probably somewhat heard of or learned a rapid release. Because you know, Michael, Andre and Craig Martell are wonderful at being able to describe how having a fast capability for reading books is going to help you increase your, you know, your overall recognition, it's going to help you on Amazon, it's going to give you more royalties, because more books are coming out, obviously. And when I first started following them back in 2017, I was like, Oh my gosh, I don't even know people could be doing it this fast, like NaNoWriMo blew my mind back in 2010. Right. And so it was like, more than one book a year, really. And so I was like, I'm gonna do it. So in 2017, I did two books, which was like, incredible at the time. But I found as I started increasing my speed, and as I started trying to write, you know, a lot more books, it got to be super stressful, because of all those hats that were already wearing. And because if you're working another job, or if you have kids, which I have, you know, I had at the time, five kids in the house, when you're doing all these different things, it just, it gets too overwhelming, and then you start falling behind, or you start feeling like you're forgetting something, or you start feeling like things are not working quite right. So let's back up a little bit. rapid release strategies are literally just the launch strategies. So when you're going into writing a book, it means that you're writing, you know, your books for the purpose of launching them somewhat close together. And you can do this either by, you know, releasing them a book a month, some people do it by weekly, which is crazy, in my mind, some people are doing it every other month, some people are doing it quarterly. And technically, if you're launching a book every year, that still can be considered rapid release, because you're still being prolific, you're still doing this thing every single year, people can rely on when these books are coming, etc. What I teach, though, is that rather than losing your mind with, you know, constant, I think I almost talked about it on my podcast as well, toxic productivity, where you feel like you are constantly trying to produce the stuff. Rather than doing that. It's more about focusing on your editorial calendar and knowing that you can be in control of that. And going okay, I'm going to launch in what I recommend in my program, release roadmap is that you launch four bucks a year, four bucks is a great number for being prolific for continuing your process forward. Forget building that back list quickly, but without losing all sense of yourself. And like telling your family I won't see you for the next god knows how long you know what I mean, it's like, it's a little bit better, it's a little more comfortable, and you can kind of breathe a little bit. And the way I teach it, you can also have days off throughout your week as you're writing your when you're doing your six week writing sprint. And so there's a lot of a lot of stuff that can go into that. But there when it comes to being more sustainable, the two that I have, that I really tell people a lot is either to pick your release strategy, we're releasing quarterly, like a book a quarter, and that one feels a little bit nicer, because you can you know, write the book, launch it and then start moving on to the next book, you don't have to necessarily be super far in advance of your launch schedule. Where if you're going to start launching a book a month, it's really beneficial, at least for your sanity to have a number of books already written before they start launching. So you're gonna want to have three maybe four books already written before you start doing a book a month so that way you're you're in advance of yourself. But if you're doing it for a year, you know, you could have two of them ready to go out before you start launching as long as you know what your schedule looks like and how quickly you can Write, it's not as big of a deal.

Emma Dhesi:

Yeah, I love what you said there about being in control of your time. And this is something I speak a lot about as well, because often we hear people say, I don't have time to read, to write, I don't have enough time. But if I'm a big believer in planning, and it sounds like you are, too, if you can schedule your time ahead or plan your head of time ahead, then you you feel more in control. So you feel more relaxed, and you can come to your desk with a completely different headspace than if you're just trying to skirt you know, plus, we're gonna squeeze some writing time in around your already busy life,

Carissa Andrews:

frantic manifestation. That's what that is otherwise frantic manifestation?

Emma Dhesi:

Yeah. So that's really good. So we know, then that rapidly thing can be as far apart as one book a year, but making sure that it's the same time every year, but also can be as rapid as a month as well, and kind of everything in between. and So you find that to be very successful. And I, I know that you teach it with your rapid release roadmap. Course. Could you tell us something about that?

Carissa Andrews:

Sure. Yeah. So in rapid release roadmap, we, I talked a lot about why it's so important to have that editorial calendar, and why it's important to decide for yourself what those release schedules are going to look like, and decide, you know, whether you're going to be doing it a book a quarter, or if it's going to be two books a year, whatever that's going to look like for you. And it's important then to know, okay, the best way to launch us to launch your books is through a series, because if you're going to write four books in a year, you're not having to recreate the wheel every single time. And so we do this whole series planning part of it, where we're going through, okay, there's three different types of series, there's the finite arc, there is a standalone series, and then there's the never ending series that will just continue on with books, they can be connected, you know, or not, sometimes they're not throughout the whole thing. And so they could go on for you know, 30 500,000, books, whatever, you know what I mean. And so I help them try to figure out what that's going to look like, what series they're going to be planning. And then they decide on what the schedule is going to look like. And when we go into it, I'm a nano front nano fan. And so what I decided to do for my authors and my students is to show them that look, you can kind of take what nano does, and kind of spread it out just a little bit. So I do a six week reading sprint, and so we do six weeks, so that we're writing every single day, but have weekends off, you know what I mean? So it's, it's five days a week, we're doing probably around 2000 words a day during that six week timeframe. But when it's done, then you're moving on to the editorial phase, you're worrying about the next planning phase, that's going to be super quick, because you've already done the series part of it. And then you're going to be pushing it out to the production side of it and getting it moved in. And so we talked a lot about, you know, how the promotion schedule should look and different ways you can can increase that speed and really make it more manageable without feeling like you're a headless chicken running around. I mean, yeah, I've been there, I have been there.

Emma Dhesi:

And that's what's so great about it as you have been there. And so now you've got taking what you've learned and sharing it with your students. And I particularly love that you do offer not just how to write the book or write the series and planet. But how do you launch as well, because there's a whole, a whole new kind of area of skill, and you give it to people there, this is how to do it and keep it simple, and make it sort of easy and doable, and probably enjoyable as well,

Carissa Andrews:

for indie authors, because we love you. I mean, obviously we love to our stories, we love to weave in our subplots, and whatever. So when it comes to like our real life, we make things way more complicated than they need to be. Like, we like the hard way around. What is that?

Emma Dhesi:

Exactly? Yeah. And so is you. You're the roadmap, is it? Is it great for new writers as well? Or do you need to be a little bit further down the line? Who do you think this is a good course for?

Carissa Andrews:

I think it's good for anyone who has kind of the baseline of what it's going to look like to publish, as long as they have an understanding of the landscape, I think they'd be fine. Because you don't, when I go in through rapid release roadmap, and even though my recommendations are for a year, you don't have to start there. Like the process is the same. You know, it's the same for processes, no matter if you're publishing a book a year, or if you're publishing four books a year, you're 12 bucks here, you still have to plan it, you have to write it and edit it, you still have to publish it, you still have to promote it. So those those phases are always going to be the same. It's just a matter of, you know, what level and how quickly you want to be able to go ahead and do those things. And one of the biggest parts is knowing that the launch strategy is only part of it like you don't have to, you know, if a launch goes awry and you don't get the kinds of readers that's really looking for you can always relaunch through a huge promotion or promo stacking week or, you know, there's all sorts of different ways really the The rapid release launch is only a small part of what it is you're doing that the goal of it is just to keep you moving forward and get that ball rolling and keep that backless growing.

Emma Dhesi:

And it's a great way to do it, it was a super course that you've put together there. So I really recommend our listeners, check it out. Definitely, definitely. So you mentioned 20 books to 50k. There. So 50k. You know, that's something that I think a lot of us would love to get to and beyond even. But I've certainly noticed that money can be quite a emotive subject for a lot of writers. And there seems to be kind of a lot of fear around investing in oneself or investing in the book itself. But I know that I noticed that that's something that you've been talking a little bit about recently is the idea of the the millionaire author mindset, which I love. I'm big into that. So I wondered if you could just tell us a little bit about what it is you've been speaking about recently? Sure, you

Carissa Andrews:

bet. I think you really put the the nail on the head, there am I when it comes to hit the nail on the head, put that out, whatever, you you know what I'm saying? It, it really comes down to like I've been in this industry for over a decade now, which is super weird, but okay. And I've seen over and over through myself and through my peers that we do have this like poverty mindset when it comes to our books and our writing and our creations. And one of the missions that I have, and have always had, but I've kind of transitioned a little bit this past year is to start talking more about it because in the authors have this idea that they how almost have to be the starving artist, right. And it's so not the case. And one of the things that I have always been fascinated with his money mindset and having the idea that manifestation is a hands on thing. It's not just like this blue topic. It's actually literally literally like energetic frequency. And making sure that you are thinking thoughts that are in alignment to your beliefs, your beliefs are in alignment with what it is you believe you can have, obviously, and then you're doing the thing that's going to bring whatever your desire is, let's say it's a millionaire author, you know, destiny to you, you're doing the actions that are gonna make it inevitable. And so I want to help indie authors kind of understand that having that mindset that they can't invest in themselves, or they can't, you know, pay a cover designer to get their their great cover put on there, or they can't learn how to do book blurbs from you know, Brian Cohen, whatever the case is, it's like you need to as an indie author, entrepreneur, or you need to understand that this is a business and if you want to earn from it, you need to invest in some way shape or form so that you can start to you know, grow yourself, grow your business, and grow that that destiny. So it starts becoming a reality, whether it's 50k. One of the things that was really super, I mean, I've been fascinated for this with this by it for a while here was through written word media, Clayton novelette did a number of studies, I think he's done three of them now, about the landscape of indie authorship, and like how many books it takes, on average to earn this, like $60,000 a year, for instance, or 100,000 or more. And what he found and what he's been finding over and over is that you have to have about 22 books in your back list just to earn that 60,000 mark. But if you want to hit 100,000, it shortens it's like 28 books. So it's like six books difference between having 60,000 A year and $100,000 a year based off of this survey, obviously, the results are gonna vary a little bit. But that's still really great benchmarks. And so if you know that you have to have a good back list and you have to, you know, probably have good editing and good covers, understand your tropes and your genre. You're gonna make a living, you know, eventually it's gonna happen, and it's inevitable, but you need to treat your business like this thing that's gonna just keep going, you're just gonna keep creating those products, you're gonna keep creating your worlds, you're gonna keep pulling new readers in. And that's just the cycle that's just gonna keep on rockin.

Emma Dhesi:

Yeah. So even though you're not seeing it right now, at this very precise moment. That's not to say that you're not going to see the rewards come in a year or two years time. Yep. And one thing I always find fascinating and for myself, as well as from what you've seen, where do you think the reluctance to invest comes from? Because do you think it's just purely the idea of this return on financial return on the investment? Or do you think there's something deeper going on there?

Carissa Andrews:

Oh, there's definitely something deeper. It all comes down to worthiness. They don't know that they're worthy of doing the thing. They there's some sort of disconnect there between their worth and what they think they can accomplish. And so what they do is start sabotaging what they're capable of doing because they don't think they're worthy of it. Either. They're not worthy of having the money or having the acclaim or putting themselves out there to be seen. or they're not they don't think the writing is good enough. So then imposter syndrome, you know, obviously starts cropping up. There's a lot of worth stuff that's embedded in there. And so that's where that mindset part of it really comes into play. It's, it's flipping the script on what we're telling ourselves in our minds, so that we can change our thoughts so that our belief structures are going to go more into alignment with what it is really desire. Because I personally believe that our desires are there on purpose, they're there to guide us toward what our actual destiny is. And otherwise, if we're, if we're not following those desires, and we're not listening to the emotions in our body, that are telling us like, we want to go here, but we're not like, anything that's making you feel bad, that's the wrong direction, you know what I mean. And if we're not doing that, if we're not following that destiny, then we're gonna feel unfulfilled, and we're gonna feel like this is a bust, and we're gonna give up and we don't need that we need more awesome, creative, wonderful, big hearted people, putting their stuff out into the world, and having money to do great things with the world. I mean, think of all the wonderful people you can help as a big hearted entrepreneur author, just by having money. I mean, you could be supporting other authors, you could be supporting a PA that needs a job, you could be supporting graphic designers were, oh, there's all sorts of people, you start all of a sudden helping, and it could be even bigger than that. Maybe you're having a nonprofit organization that helps other people you don't know. I mean, when you start earning money, the sky's the limit. And so why are you limiting yourself?

Emma Dhesi:

No question. Yeah, it is. So one question I had off the back of that was, and this is something actually I, I, I have to admit, I still struggle with this one a little bit. And, you know, we, as writers, we feel this compulsion to write this is something that won't leave us alone, we can never quite scratch that itch. But sometimes there's a feeling or the idea that you've got a purpose and for being here, or that there's a vision for your life, it can feel a little bit overwhelming. So do you have any kind of thoughts or advice for people or a starting point for someone who is thinking, Hmm, I know I'm here for something bigger. I know, I'm here for something more than just me, but I don't know what it is. How can I start to figure that out?

Carissa Andrews:

Sure. Well, I got two thoughts on that. So the first one is to go, Okay, if you are a writer, and you can't scratch that itch, and you always are compelled to come back to writing, what makes you think that you don't already know what that destiny is, it might just mean you're in the second act, it might mean you're in the middle of your book right now. You know, look at it like that, that okay, that middle, that messy, middle is just always long, and you slog through it, and you're trying to get it over with and you just want to get to the frickin resolution, right? That's all we all are. But you might just be in the middle of your book. And so rather than feeling like you're lost or feeling like you don't know what you're doing, because I'm pretty sure your main characters probably feel that same way in the middle of Book Two. Just recognize where you are in your journey. And know that that's the place where you're supposed to be you know, it if you if you keep coming back to writing and you can't let it go. You know what your destiny is you feel it. But if you really aren't sure, like, if you're like me, this isn't for me, then that goes back to trusting those emotions, your emotions are your guideposts. So if you go, writing is making me feel anxious and not good. And I don't like it, it might be time for a break, it might be time to dive into some new passions for a bit and to see if writing calls you back. Or if something else takes you away. And there's no judgment in that because you have a calling you have your destiny. And so the only person that can understand that and trust it is yourself. So you need to you know, listen more to your own mind. And I think that's where, you know, slowing down a little bit and having those breathing spaces comes in. So critically, that if we don't have that if we're trying to produce too quickly, or if we're trying to do too many things all at once. We're not listening to our voice. We're just starting to do that frantic manifestation frantic everything. And then nothing feels right. And it just feels like static, you know? And so it's like you need to, you need to kind of call metal out so that you can see clearly and feel clearly.

Emma Dhesi:

Oh, such good advice. And I love the analogy you've given us there that maybe we are we are actually in our messy middle. I feel messy. Yeah.

Carissa Andrews:

That was so interesting. To me. I had like an aha moment. I think it was a couple of weeks ago now. Where for me, I'm trying. I've been trying to call this millionaire destiny to me for a while and I'm like, Gosh, why is it taking forever because I'm a double Virgo guys. I have a moon and a sun in Virgo. So I want the thing when I want the thing. I want resolution now. And I kept feeling like I'm still waiting. I'm still waiting for this thing to happen. And I realized I was like, why am I waiting? That's the energy I'm stuck in. I'm in. I'm stuck in the loop of waiting. No screw that I am actively receiving. I can see that. It's literally I'm in the same place I was before. But rather than feeling like I'm still waiting, I am receiving I'm seeing my backlist grow. I'm seeing my readership grow. I'm seeing my royalties grow, I'm seeing everything's going up and up. But for whatever reason, it was just a switch in my brain, were looking at it from a different perspective and going, hmm, I am actively receiving it is already here. I'm just not, you know, where I think I should be or want to be at this particular moment? And who cares about that? I'm seeing it happen.

Emma Dhesi:

Yes, and so it's almost feels like it's a change in perspective, if you're just looking at the same situation from another viewpoint. And, and that feels like something that you're you're trying to help authors do is to rather than them constantly feeling stuck, that they can't finish this book, or they can't get the publisher or they can't get the royalties, but actually, to how to reframe that for themselves and rethink it. And we almost adjust what they're putting out into the universe. And I know that you're going to, you're actively want to help people do that. And so you've got a new challenge sort of coming up to help people give an introduction to that. I wonder if you'd share something?

Carissa Andrews:

You bet. So yeah, I've been doing some March has been like the big cracking open for me. So I've been doing on tick tock, a lot of millionaire author, March concepts. So every day, I'm dropping little tips on like, how to change their mindset, right. And so in April, I'm launching this millionaire Author Challenge, where we're gonna be diving into the three fundamental aspects of millionaire author mindset, and how to shift the poverty mindset and get more into one of the wealthy author who has this destiny that they need to embrace. And so on April 18, through the 22nd, we're going to be talking a lot about it's going to be a three day challenge. But we'll have a couple of extra days to have some talks and kind of continue to do the work that we're trying to dig into. And so if people are interested in that, they can always head over to my millionaire author, Coach website. So it's millionaire author, Coach comm forward slash challenge, and you can get signed up there. And what we're going to do, like I said, we're just going to dig into, you know, why it is that we want to hold on to this poverty mindset when we have all sorts of other unlimited possibilities out there, including bringing that millionaire author destiny to us. So let's do it.

Emma Dhesi:

Yeah, because I've done a little bit of kind of money mindset work as well. And what I I'm sure will happen for people is, when they do this, and they start to see the changes, it'll impact not just their writing life and their books, but actually will have this kind of ripple effect throughout their whole life.

Carissa Andrews:

Absolutely. Because it's changing the way that you're thinking is changing your thoughts, which changes your belief structure, which changes your energetic system, so that you are presenting yourself and acting completely differently to what you've been acting before. It's kind of funny, because people go, Oh, my gosh, why there's something different about you, and they can't quite put their finger on it. But it's because you're changing your energetic frequency, to be more in alignment with the things that you're really liking, which lights you up. And people notice, because it's I mean, that's how we are. We're all energetic beings. And we have to kind of come back around to that and understand how powerful and potent that is.

Emma Dhesi:

Yeah, it's, it's literally isn't it, it's lighting someone up. And we've all seen it and people around us that there's something shifting, or Carissa, this has been great. I've really loved chatting with you. And I think what you're doing is a wonderful, wonderful thing for writers and really helping them to see money in a different way, see themselves in a different way and see their potential in a different way. So I wish you all the luck with that. I think it's gonna be great. Now, if people want to, actually, I'd love to know, what are you working on right now? Are you still writing at the moment? Do you have time to Yeah,

Carissa Andrews:

you bet. Yeah, right now I just so I'm actually in the middle of launch week. So as of this recording, I'm launching a brand new series called accidental alpha. So it's my take on the werewolf genre, but it's midlife werewolf. And the main character is an alpha female instead of that, you know, man chested Alpha Man. So I just finished that we're launching it up. And so I've been in the, in the outlining phase for the rest of the series. And it's going to have five books. So I'm very excited about that. But I have another pen name that I'm going to be working on this year, which had this really crazy idea kind of come to me and so I'm dipping my toe into contemporary romance with a little bit of a twist, because I can't do that without a twist, I guess. So we're gonna see how that goes. And so I'm in the outlining phase. Really, I'm in outlining phase this week. But I'm gonna be starting the writing phase. So my six week writing sprint is going to start next week four, I got to decide I haven't decided if it's going to be accidental Alpha book to or if it's going to be this new pen name might if it's up to Jenny, my PA, it'll be accidental alpha, but

Emma Dhesi:

you are so so busy. I'm so impressed. Thank you.

Carissa Andrews:

It's fun. It's so fun. Okay,

Emma Dhesi:

so if anybody wants to find out more about your books or more about your teaching, and you're coaching, where can they do that?

Carissa Andrews:

Sure. So my books would be over at Carissa andrews.com. So it's Carissa with an A at the end and then Andrews, so there are two A's in the middle Carissa and Drew's dot com, and then author revolution.org is the website for the courses and for a lot of the stuff that is going to be around that. So not just rapid release roadmap, but there are a couple of other courses that people can get into because of it. So that's author revolution.org. Two hours in the middle with that one, go figure. So I like those two like to work. Two letters are there in middle. But yeah, so there's a lot of different ways that they can can get to know me or if they want to check out the author Revolution podcast that's available to them as well.

Emma Dhesi:

Yeah. Fantastic. I'll make sure to link to all of those. That's brilliant. Thank you. Well, Chris, thanks so much. Good luck with everything, and I'll be in touch soon.

Carissa Andrews:

Absolutely. Thanks, Emma.

Emma Dhesi:

Well, thank you so much for joining me today. I hope you find that helpful and inspirational. Now, don't forget to come on over to facebook and join my group, turning readers into writers. It is especially for you if you are a beginner writer who is looking to write their first novel. If you join the group, you will also find a free cheat sheet. They're called Three Secret hacks to write with consistency. So go to Emma desi.com forward slash turning readers into writers. Hit join. Can't wait to see you in there. All right. Thank you. Bye bye.