Turning Readers Into Writers

040 - Get audacious with motivational writer Dom Brightmon

December 10, 2020 Emma Dhesi, Dom Brightmon Season 1 Episode 40
Turning Readers Into Writers
040 - Get audacious with motivational writer Dom Brightmon
Show Notes Transcript

What's in this episode:

Dom Brightmon hosts the podcast Going North! He is a motivational speaker and writer who was first drawn to the world of books when he wanted to make a change in his life. He found himself in the leadership section of the library. Everything changed after that.

He is a passionate advocate for libraries and believes there are as relevant now as they ever were, especially in 2020 with Covid-19 putting a lot of people out of work.

Dom wants to share the benefits of a positive mindset, a skill essential to a successful author career. He uses the RAVE method:

Read good material
Audio emersion
Virtual Stimulation
Encouragement

Dom Brightmon has words of encouragement, especially for Millennials who want to reach their potential.

He shares his productivity strategy and tips for getting started if you've ever thought about starting a podcast.

Find out more about Dom HERE.

You'll find Dom on Facebook, Twitter, IG and YouTube.

Links mentioned in the episode:


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Emma Dhesi:

Woohoo. Dominic Dom Brightman DTM is an award winning speaker and certified member with the john Maxwell team. He is the best selling author of going north. tips and techniques to advance yourself stay the course the elite performers seven secret keys to sustainable success, and a contributing author for crappie to happy sacred stories of transformational joy. Don hosts the going north podcast, a top rated self help podcast that interviews authors from all over the world. His mantra is advance others to advance yourself. In the episode he has some great tips on how we can improve our mindset to make sure we stay resilient, and even give some advice. If you're thinking about starting your own podcast, let's find out what he's got to say. Welcome to the turning readers into writers Podcast, where we teach beginner writers how to find the time and the confidence to write their first novel. I'm your host, Emma Desi. And I'm very excited that you're here. Thank you for joining me today. Because if you've been longing to write your novel for forever, then this is the place to be. Think of this as your weekly dose of encouragement of handholding and general cheerleading, as you figure out how you're going to write your first novel. Trust me, as a mom of three young kids, I know how tricky it can be to tuck some time aside for yourself on a regular basis. And even when you do find that spare five minutes, you can feel so overwhelmed that no rating gets done. Trust me, I have been there. But this podcast is going to help you in practical ways. Because once a week, I'll be delivering an episode that gives you steps to building a writing routine, encouragement to build your confidence and cheerleading until you reach the end. Okay, let's start. Well, Dominic, thank you so much for joining me today. I'm thrilled to have you on the show.

Dom Brightmon:

thrilled to be here with you, Emma, Earl here to be with you.

Emma Dhesi:

Now, I was interested that you've said that you were a voracious reader. And I wonder, you know, since an early early age, and I wonder what it was in those early days that drew you towards to books and stories and maybe you could share some of your favourites with us.

Dom Brightmon:

Sure thing so what drew me to becoming a voracious reader, funny enough was actually dealing with life setbacks, because with a, I'm pretty sure like, we've all had books that we've been forced to read in grade school that we didn't like to read. And it made me hate reading at one point. And Funny enough, but this was even after getting a part time job in a library no less, that actually having some setbacks in life where there were some miscommunication issues with the boss, among some other things of dealing with some family issues that led me to realise you know what something has to change. And in life, at least once a minimum, we're all gonna have a desire to change. And that the mizzu, the leadership section of the library, picked up a book by john C. Maxwell. And then that just led me down the rabbit hole of really loving books again, and just reading great books like thinking for change. That's one of them. Definitely a great book, like no matter who you are, what your background is, that's a definitely good book, because we can all pick up some tips on how to become a better thinker. And Heck, even, especially when it comes to writing where that is a mind process. It's a mental process. And that even one of my favourite questions from that book is what good will I do today, and just getting your mind ready to do something good at thinking or something positive and setting your intention for the day and even the alchemist by Paulo Coelho, like, that's one of the few fiction books that I've read. In the past few years I've really enjoyed and just stuff like that, to really get yourself going. So really just setbacks in life and falling in love of reading because, like, no matter what the book is, like you can learn from whether it's fiction or nonfiction, where you can learn something new that you can apply to your life and change your life for the better and not butter.

Emma Dhesi:

Yeah, no, I absolutely agree. It was in doing a lot of those sort of mindset, reading a lot of the mindset books and and trying to change my thinking, that's one of the things that prompted me to get my writing life in gear and kind of decide, okay, do I want this or do I not? And so it's nice that the skills that we can learn perhaps in one industry, we can then transfer them into another industry that's more relevant to ourselves. But that's interesting. You said that you you were working in a library because libraries will in the UK I do they are I don't know about in the States, but in the UK, they're a bit of a hot topic, right? Now because there's less and less funding for them, but it's still something that we need. The big debate around is, are these still relevant in today's world in the 21st century? And what are your thoughts on that?

Dom Brightmon:

Yes, I'm glad you brought that up, because I really get a chance to talk about it. Because from working in the public library for 13 years in the states like it, I'm not sure how it is for the UK, but they are a huge community centres, especially with the huge sky high unemployment rates, even before COVID that we have, we're dealing with where people still looking for jobs. And the thing is, like with lava, especially public ones, like from cradle to the grave, we basically serve everyone getting folks to really get into the reading early. And when they become teenagers do some teen programmes with them, college, they may need some textbooks or some extra books or the research papers. And adults Heck, even when they have kids a place to take their kids to and when their senior citizens, they may get some new technology, where tech savvy librarians now where that's basically a requirement to help folks get more used to using their iPad, their tablet or smartphone or something like that. And even some folks who actually didn't plan to well for life and are still looking for employment even after retirement. So it's one heck of a community resource in that given in the states with COVID, thanks to the county funding, we're actually we're able to extend our Wi Fi to reach the parking spots at the parking lots of our buildings. So that way, folks can actually still use the internet during COVID. Because not everybody has high speed internet. And it's really just stuff like that, Heck, even right now. Like there's even a small programme where we actually give free meals to kids in the school district during this whole pandemic thing because a lot of kids like the school is really where they got their chance to eat. So basically being a community resource, because that's probably the biggest argument of maybe making that transfer of thinking it as a place of just for books and card catalogues, when those probably don't even exist anymore. Most libraries to really seeing it as a big resource, where it's not just books, it's the people behind the books, like you myself are both authors. There's humans behind these pages here, whether they're gone or still here. And those folks have at least once a library at least once the check out a book or Nate, were inspired by that. And just us as a community inspirational hub to help folks realise like, hey, libraries is still needed. It can be a community resource. It's not just a storehouse for books. It's an information sanctuary.

Emma Dhesi:

Mm hmm. Yeah, I think we're, we're not quite as far down that track as you guys are over there. But we're certainly moving towards it being more of a community hub. So I hope that helps. And it will in the long run, keep libraries there and keep because there are people who need them as you say, No, Euro you your first book when you were at the tender age of 23. So what made you feel that you wanted to write a book at that point in your life? And how did you go about actually doing the writing of it?

Dom Brightmon:

Sure things so after the whole, voracious reading rebirth, of basically dealing with some life setbacks, I went to a Toastmasters meeting. And for those who don't know, Toastmasters International nonprofit organisation, basically go and become a better speaker and communicator, and a leader. And there was this one club I visited out in kaysville. And they had a guest speaker that evening by the name of Daniel alley. And he was around 25, at the time, and I was around a good 2220 2221. And he gave this speech on how to act like a leader. And his acronym for that actually went to being audacious, contagious, and tenacious. And for those that are writing, you have to be audacious enough to actually set out to write a book. And then you have to be audacious enough to hit Publish. And then you have to actually be audacious enough to go out there. Promote the book is another thing, too. You can write all day, you can publish books all day. But if no one knows about it, then what's the point? And you have to be contagious, you have to basically market yourself, and then get to the point where you're contagious enough in a good way that folks know about you enough. And then you have to be tenacious, to keep going, no matter what happens with all the setbacks that happened. And now granted, that wasn't the version he gave, but those the same three words. And he had this book called, you're the boss, and I was like, wow, like it. Like this guy is a couple years older than me. Millennials still still got glasses, and didn't have all the extra weight back then skinny as me and everything. And he had this book about the book from a wind home, read it, and I was like this guy's writing about the same stuff I'm reading about. So that inspired me to eventually write a book and came across another book called The magic of getting what you want. And in that book, I mentioned how you should write your own personal obituary. Well, for some reason I wrote that was going to be a best selling author of multiple books. And after that activity, a couple more months down the line, I met this wonderful lady. And I was handing out these wonderful reading lists to people called the 100 books or dynamic living, as opposed to business cards, because business cards usually go in the trash. And if your face is known, and folks don't remember it, then good luck with that. And she looked at the list, she looked right back at me looked at the list, look right back at me and asked me where my name was on this list. And I was like, Nah, my name is not on the list, cuz I'm not an author. And she's like, Hey, why don't you write a book? And I'm like, I think I'm good. This is after the obituary activity like that. I'm not gonna do it. And just like, Hey, you know what, even better? How about a year from today? How about we both write books and a year from today? We could say we're both published authors. And I was like, Yeah, nice. Sounds a little too intense. I think I'm good. And then after the session ended, I basically did some soul searching and realised You know what, maybe I should probably write this book because I did some deep thought was like, I did put this in a obituary, well, why don't I go ahead and actually go and make this thing happen. So that was around 2015. That year when the dare happened. And then October 2016. Right before November 1, it says, that was the day that that conversation happened. My first book was published, because I basically still took her up on that dairy, even though we never really shook hands to make it official. Because I had to wake up and realise like, hey, because it's like, sometimes you don't get things instantly the first time, sometimes the another knock on the head, or sometimes the process some things.

Emma Dhesi:

Yeah, so maybe it sounds like it was there was that little bit of them? And we all get it done with that little bit of fear that says, Oh, no, I'm not ready for this. I can't do it yet. And then it takes a moment to galvanise and think, Okay, do I want this? Is this on my obituary? Right? I've got to step up to the plate, and I've got to do it. So that's really interesting. It took me about a year to do. So how did you actually go about writing the book? Did you pen and paper computer dictates? How did you do it?

Dom Brightmon:

Definitely the first two, the pen and paper then the computer because that soul searching moment happened in one of those Toastmaster meetings where there's a q&a session that was required for the presentation. And my buddy of mine who wrote a book of his own, asked me in the q&a session, like hey, Don, when's your book. Now module, that quest had nothing to do with the presentation, I was giving it all. So he just saw an opportunity just to put a fire under my butt. And when I went ahead and declared that mean, that was gonna happen. I ran home and started writing furiously, I wrote like 14 pages of raw content, like whatever was came to me as a stream of consciousness, the pen was on fire. And then I went through like a little hibernation period for a few weeks, because that was no, I was like November when that happened. Then December happened. And then January 2016, I picked up the book project again, and set out every weekend to get in the coffee shop. And that's another thing about writing, you got to be in your own place to productivity to write, like if you need to place with ambient noise, like a coffee shop, or just have music on your headphones. Like I listen to music a lot when I write, because it usually provokes like a lot of different thought and helps me to remind remind me of certain things, and really just taking it so deciding a time to write like in one of the episodes where he mentioned how you have to have a writing routine. And Time management is definitely a requirement. Like really just being aware of how much time you have and using it to your advantage and scheduling it. Because that's really where the magic happens. Because every weekend after work, I set aside time to write. And also I would keep pen and paper with me in my car. So that way, if something happens to me, especially after a workout session, because if you do is sweat, you're eventually going to have something to come out of your head and inspire you. And just basically ink it when I thought it so when you so it could when you think it when it comes to mind like that. So that was really part of it. The other piece was basically typing in all the stuff I wrote down. So I'm basically editing my thoughts as I'm going around before actually submitting it to an editor. And that was the process for book number one, because with the writing, it's a lot faster than typing, at least for me. And usually, it's a lot Not only is it faster, it actually sticks a lot better when you see it on paper in your own eyes. And then as you type it in, you'll be like, oh god, what influence was I under when I was writing this? And you're like, oh god, no, let me go ahead and change this up or polish it up and make it even better. So there was actual writing happening with the book there was still writing and typing.

Emma Dhesi:

Now that's very similar to myself. Actually. I can ingredient that I love that bit of handwriting, there's a connection between the brain and the hand isn't there in it, you can just let it all out. And then when you transcribe it onto the computer is like having that first edit, and you can start to shape things and tighten them up. So, yeah, we work in a similar way. I like that. And now I I kind of tell my students that having the right mindset being in the right frame of mind is half the battle to writing your book, no matter whether it's fiction, nonfiction, memoir, whatever, because it takes resilience and it takes and commitment because it's, for most of us, it takes quite a while to write the book. It's not something you do in a couple of days. And and I wonder if you have any thoughts on some of the ways that agents can perhaps develop a more positive mental attitudes towards their towards their writing?

Dom Brightmon:

Yes, yes, indeed. So for positive mindset to develop it, I like to drop the rave method, that's something that I use for rock solid optimism. And the acronym rave stands for AR. So the RS for reading, reading great material. So make sure you read Emma's books and a bunch of other great books out there. The A is for audio immersion. So if you're listening to this podcast right now, then you get a gold star. And then there's the V for visual stimulation where you're making sure you're having your eyes set on something positive, everyday, like having quotes like heck even. I'll even pull up one of these sticky notes I got right here. I'm not sure folks be able to see it on the zoom thing. It says always focus on the payoff, where I basically keep Inspirational Quotes and Sayings because that even Daniel actually brought him on as my coach at the time when I went to his home, like he had sticking to him and his girlfriend has sticky notes everywhere have goals and inspirational sayings. So you basically have to have your environment ready, kind of like with the P o. p, the place of productivity earlier, when you're being in your place of productivity. It's got to be in a place where creativity is allowed to flow. It's making sure it's an area where it's not too much cluttered, because I've actually talked to a declutter expert before a couple of them. And they said things which I agree with is effect that creativity flows a lot better than the open room where it's not cluttered. Because if the room is cluttered, you think, oh, crap, I got these books everywhere, got all these papers everywhere, it's like making sure your space for writing is clean and open and ready for you to take action and letting that creativity flow. And of course, the E is encouragement, encouraging yourself and others because it's great to encourage other people, we all need it. And it'll pay off where it'll come back down to you down the line. And we always have to encourage ourselves to especially when we get up in the morning and actually doing the business for ourselves and still having a day job to fund our creativity habits. Because very, because very few folks make money off of writing. And if they make money off, right, it's because of all the systems they have around it. Like a bunch of big name authors, you pay attention and do some studies on them. Heck, even books in the personal development space, like Brendon Burchard, like his, he basically buys all of his books themselves, himself gives them a wave to people. And they send them to his online courses like James Patterson has a bunch of Ghost Riders with them writing all these books cranking out almost like crazy, probably a book a day almost appeals like with him. It's like rabbits at given Joanna pen with all the stuff that she does. Like she has a podcast, the audio book, and uses her one book to create multiple streams of income. So basically remembering yourself to encourage yourself. So just a quick recap of it, the our reading great material, a audio immersion, the stem visual stimulation and encouragement, encouraging yourself and others to stay positive.

Emma Dhesi:

It's a great acronym. I love that that's superior. I'll be I'll be remembering that one. Sweet. And just kind of following on from that slightly. You've said that there are three skills that millennials in particular needs to develop, which as I am long past being a millennial kind of amused me. So I wonder if you could share that with us. And I wonder if they're also clickable to the writing life?

Dom Brightmon:

Yes, they are. One of them is building strong relationships, especially with people of high value. Now everyone is valuable everyone is I'm not saying no one is more valuable than other. But I'm just saying there are some people on a scale, they may be a one. And some may be an eight if you want to be around more eights than ones because some ones are those who may have not and gotten over certain things and they try to spread their misery around others. So making sure that you're around people that that are actually positive now she helped you even call you out on your bs from time to time that helped me to be better. So building those relationships and applause Writing because in this big, small world of the internet, if you pay attention to people, like a lot of books are starting this podcast nowadays, like the book itself, the writings, one thing like that, I think there's still a part of the world where they think the writing is the hard part. Yeah, it's hard, especially for a fiction book, because you have to have all these characters and stories have to make sense. And, really, you have the main character, Mom, but every side character thinks of the main character in the story. But you have to also, like keep the relationship thing in mind. Because there may be like podcasts like, like Emma's podcast, you may want to get onto hers, just listening and subscribing to hers. And so sharing your posts and everything, so that we can be on the radar. And if you do it enough, and then when you get close to close to your book release, then you'll have one outlet to get your message out there, because you still have to promote your work. And Heck, even strangers, or sometimes the new family in a way, like there's this one quote, where it says that friends are God's way of apologising for your family. And that's depending on your situation, of course. And just having those relationships of wonderful people and building them up is definitely skill. Number one, skill number two is communication. And that can go in multiple ways, because there's written communication, of course, writing a book, verbal communication, public speaking, and of course, the selling of your stuff as well. And that can branch off into copywriting and so many other skills. So communication would be number two. And number three would basically be financial literacy. Because that's something that a lot of folks aren't taught in schools, like I remember, I don't even think I'm sure folks out in the public schools in the States, but I had a consumer math course. And that was like 12th grade. And that was 12th. Grade now is one class, like God forbid, who knows what they may have gotten in the public area. Because to be honest, depending on the area, some schools don't teach the things that people should know. So the three skills would be building strong relationships, especially with high value people, communication, written verbal, and although the good stuff, as well as a third one, which would be financial literacy,

Emma Dhesi:

and action, which is so important, and so I think undervalued, and certainly here in the UK, we stopped doing any kind of, we have the option to stop doing any kind of sums or math at the age of 16. But even a lot of what we're taught in those classes, it's not relevant to your day to day life and trying to manage a budget and live within your means. So yeah, I'd love to see a big overhaul in that. I keep thinking I might be a rich woman by now doing more at a younger age. Maybe not, anyway, awaits you. I'm going for it. And now you have a podcast to call going north. And tell us about the podcast and why you started it.

Dom Brightmon:

Sure thing. So the podcast was an original idea. I was going to start that before ever writing a book was on my radar. Because folks would tell me for years, I've got this great voice radio, and oh my god, cool. Right. So podcasts should be a good way to use it for good. I don't know what they'll my podcast is going to be about. But I decided you know what, let me go ahead and start one. Then after publishing my book in 2016, six months after it was published, I lost my father, after as long battle with all summers. And I slacked off on the marketing for obvious reasons, grief and everything. And I realised You know what, I should probably get back to marketing his book. Here's my first one. And I said, I got another one coming out. Two years after that. So want to start a podcast. And after talking with a buddy of mine, and that kind of goes with the whole relationship building thing, I talked it over with a buddy of mine over coffee, and she was like, Hey, why don't you call your podcast going north podcast because you basically have a brand new year, because going north that's usually my response to people when they ask me, how's it going? And the book is called going north. So why don't you make the podcast going north? I'm like, you know what, I think I'll do that. Because virtually gonna call it the Mr. Music and reads podcast. And it just ended up being about that. And then then, basically, every Monday and Thursday, a new episode goes up. It's an interview with an author, different author, no matter what the job well, of course, if it's politics or something I like to delve into politics, especially when it being election year, people are kind of going stark raving mad this year. But visually if it's except for like, politics, or maybe like maybe something dark like most folks like it, I've had multiple offers on my show. I've had about about 331 episodes in so far. And every Monday and Thursday, a new episode goes up. I've interviewed a bunch of others before, fiction, nonfiction, and of course me You're always welcome to come on the show too, because I'm always looking to return the favour for fellow book casters to really get their message out there because it's bigger than me. It's like yeah, I want to promote my But this is really a better way to promote myself as a brand as well, because podcasting, there's a million podcasts out there. And not everybody is going to keep their podcast up. Like there's that pod vaping thing where folks, like have like a few episodes up. And then they feel like you know what? I'm not a millionaire yet. I don't see a Joe Rogan contract, some acquit. Even though Joe Rogan has a whole life outside of his show for decades before he even got that contract. So really, the podcast happened because I wanted a new way to market my book. But to make it bigger than me, I made it all about having a place make a platform for authors get their voices heard, because that's something I needed. When I first published my book is no one knows what they're doing. Like you can know everything in the world and still not know what you're doing because you're stuffed, apply a certain tactic a certain action to a certain specific time of the day, and then reassess what happened after that action happened. So that's basically where the podcast came from.

Emma Dhesi:

Fantastic. Yeah, we need them spacey can't, there can't be enough spaces for new authors coming up and trying to find a space for ourselves, especially when you know, for the indie world, particularly when there's just so many plates to spin at one time, whether it be the craft of writing, the publishing, the promoting, or the right side of it. And there's such a lot to sort of take in. So I'm always looking for, for good podcasts. So when I should certainly be adding you to my subscribe button. Now, if we find anybody listening out there, who perhaps has written a nonfiction book, or has a love of a particular genre, for example, historical romance, for example, and they're thinking, yes, you know what, I love this topic, and I'd love to start a podcast about it. What tips might you give somebody who's is thinking about dipping their toe in the water?

Dom Brightmon:

Sure thing. So knowing your why is definitely the main thing, because that's what's gonna keep you going. Like if money is your reason for starting a podcast and look for something else, like you have a better chance of network marketing, then a podcast if you want to make money from it. And getting your wise definitely the main thing and knowing your audience is something that I wish I would have known when I started my podcast, because after watching other folks in the podcast based I realised you know what I kind of messed up that name because it it on one hand, it's like, you know what, maybe I screwed up in a, in a way in a bit, because I didn't know exactly whom I just was like, Oh, just everybody. And there's the phrase of if you're speaking to everyone, you're not speaking to no one. And at the same time, it's like, you know what, at the same time, want to keep it diverse for people. So knowing your why knowing your audience, and always promoting your work to because like that, like with anything you do, you can't just put something up there once and then just wait for folks to walk past and just grab like 10 million copies of it, or press download 5000 times a once on it. Like you have to actually get out there and do the work like with the mindset work. Like it's, you have to have the right mindset going in. And definitely while you're in the trenches, so to speak with it. So basically knowing your why, why you want to do it. And basically knowing your audience for the work. And Heck, even as another tip like going where other folks have gone like one of the past guests on my show, she actually mentioned how one question she wished you'd be asked more often, instead of how do I become a best selling authors? How do I become a great author. And one thing you can do that is by paying attention to those in your space, like with historical fiction or historical romance, like, like check out the genre, head over to Goodreads and see some of the top authors in that space, see what they do, and see what the folks are commenting on that page, and then serving them. And you basically can find your own metaphorical congregation, if you add value first, and see what they like, see what they dislike. And if you can add something that they're looking for that that author isn't giving them, that'll give you another edge. So those are just a few things that I wish I would have known started my podcast and for authors who want to go the book casting route of not only being a book writer, slash author, but also a podcaster.

Emma Dhesi:

Yeah, it was great that you get started though, I think, half the battle sometimes just getting started. And then you can learn as you go along. And the advantage of being an unknown as that you can make a lot of mistakes before you start to build any of your audience's following and, and try and learn from them as best you can. And so I've got to sort of follow up questions. One would be you produce a twice weekly podcast, that's a lot of work. And how do you fit that in around everything else? Do you have a team that works with you? Are you are you a bit of a lone ranger like me?

Dom Brightmon:

Lone Ranger like you definitely a lone ranger swag because I've gotten better with the editing over the years because like when I first started the editing was hell at my tech didn't work properly. And my guess is sound wasn't as great. So outsource the first episode because I know what that was that I was doing. And then eventually as a watch enough YouTube videos and followed enough where I got to the place where I'm comfortable with editing. And heck even getting over my semi perfect hearing of hearing every Ohm that the guest says, I bet so he got over basically the editing piece and just still doing it. So I usually fit that in like with with the editing, it usually takes at see a good half hour if I do a deep focus with it. Now if the if it's one of those long episodes, and of course can take an hour or two. And Heck, even sometimes just basically putting aside Thomas sketches like okay, hey, this is the first edit, I'm gonna put the music in the intro, and everything else at once and just having things preset, like have a few preset intros have a few outros already pre recorded and just rotate them out. And then with the actual interview piece in the middle, like the meat in the middle, just editing any background noise and things like that, that's really, I do it just making the time for because we all have the same amount of time, we just have to choose what we decide to put in it, you have to really kind of schedule everything in a way. And I've actually become more reliant on my Google Calendar more than before, because I've noticed that a lot of folks recently mentioned how to do lists, even though they're great starting out. After a while they keep getting bigger and bigger. And all these rabbits aka tick box appear on the list. And you're like, Oh crap, how to get this done, as opposed to schedule where you set aside some time to do it. So basically scheduling, just about everything is setting aside time to do it. And that even having fun with going back in the conversation and writing things down that you didn't hear the first time.

Emma Dhesi:

Yeah, yeah, no scheduling. I'm a big believer in scheduling. And it disappoints me sometimes I do because then I used to think of myself as quite a rebellious person who just went by the seat of their pants, and now everything is on the calendar. And I don't know if it's just a sign of age or just being more organised. I'm not sure but yeah. That's my second follow up question to that was you talked about, you know, it's all very well making the product, whether it be a book or a podcast episode, where you've got to let people know about it. So where can people find out about your podcast and your books online?

Dom Brightmon:

Sure thing so if you head over to DomBrightmon.com. Dom.Brightman.com you find everything about me the podcast and all things dumb, and everybody else that knows about dumb been on the show. And if you head over to that wonderful website, you'll get a free gift called the 21 lessons learned from two plus years of podcasting. It's my gift to your wonderful artists, wonderful listeners, for those who are looking to start a podcast and want to get a nice little glimpse of what's really behind the scenes of it. So yep, DomBrightmon.com.

Emma Dhesi:

That's lovely. Thank you so much for joining me today. I really enjoy chatting to you. Thank you. Whoo, right

Dom Brightmon:

back at you, I appreciate you.

Emma Dhesi:

Before you go, I want to tell you about my Patreon page, whenever anyone supports the show, it expresses just how much you're enjoying the content and how much you want it to continue. Your support helps maintain the podcast and keeps it going. It means I can create better resources for you. When you're listening to the podcast or checking out the webpage, it means I can focus on getting a higher reach of audience. And when we get a higher reach of audience, we can get more guests, guests that are really going to help you and then who knows where it'll go from there as a new podcaster and someone who's starting out and finding their feet in the podcasting world. Just as I'm helping you find your feet in the writing world. I can't do it alone. I always need help. So I'd love it. If you would support the show by signing up. There's just one tier $3 a month. And for that, I'll make sure that each week I'm delivering the best podcast I can for you and as a way of saying thanks. I'll give you a personal shout outs on the show. So check out the page at Patreon.com/Emma Dhesi. That's p a t r e o n .com/EmmaDhesi. See you next time.