RepcoLite Home Improvement Show

Episode 095: Save Your Roof from Ice Dams, Universal Design and Aging in Place

February 04, 2019
RepcoLite Home Improvement Show
Episode 095: Save Your Roof from Ice Dams, Universal Design and Aging in Place
Chapters
RepcoLite Home Improvement Show
Episode 095: Save Your Roof from Ice Dams, Universal Design and Aging in Place
Feb 04, 2019
Dan Hansen & Betsy Thompson
Transcript
Speaker 1:
0:01
Our houses made of, but only love can make a home. Welcome to the zip code, like home improvement show, helping you make your whole until one you'll love even more. Here are your hopes, Dan Hansen and Betsy Thompson will. Good morning everybody. Good morning, [inaudible]. Good Morning Dan. Welcome to the frigid Arctic. Yeah, I see you made it through the polar vortex. The polar vortex threw me for a loop. It threw everybody for a loop. There were days when we were actually colder here than it was in Antarctica. Yeah, I was tracking that. That's fun. That's kind of fun. The kids had a whole week off from school. That is kinda rubbing my nose in that every morning who we get to stay home. Dad. Yeah. And do you think that they snow blowed? Of course not. I did one day when I really crabbed. So you guilted them into it?
Speaker 1:
0:55
I did, but let's get to today because I've got a couple of things that are kind of on my mind. First off, at the end of the show, we're going to be talking to Derek Anderson from Amber Valley construction about aging at home, staying at home, and just making our homes work for us as we get older. Okay, so that's going to be really interesting. I'd like to point out you don't have to be old to be tuned into this segment, right? That's one of the points that I believe is going to come up with. Derek's a great speaker. He's got a great story. You're going to want to be here for that. Right? But before we get to that, I am concerned because yeah, I started the show with. Welcome to the polar vortex or whatever the Arctic, but it's warming up now to be like a Monday, 47, almost 50 degrees and rain. Right? And that makes me concerned about roofs with all the weight up there. So we're going to call right now, Matt Williams from Sheriff Goslin.
Speaker 2:
1:52
Oh, it's
Speaker 1:
1:53
like a long ring. I hope that's not the sign of things to come. Hello? Hello. Is this matt? Hey Matt. I thought you were a woman for a second. Did I don't mean that, I'd like to apologize for the audio quality. It was a little bit of a problem that I thought. Oh No, I missed dial. We're going to have an interesting conversation. Hey Matt. How are you doing? Good. How are you guys were doing all right. We're a little concerned. So we're concerned about roofs with all of the, the thawing that we've got going on. And so we thought let's get in touch with our roofing expert, Matt Williams from Sheriff Goslin roofing and we'll ask you some questions. And I guess my biggest question right off the bat is I'm concerned about the weight on my roof. You know, I've got a lot of snow where it drifted. So I've, I've had some areas where it's two to three foot deep. Holy smokes. And with all the rain coming potentially and the fine, is that an issue? Do I have to worry about that? And should all our listeners be concerned?
Speaker 3:
2:59
Well, the last snow storms that we've had, we've heard of roofs that has caved it. So with that said it, it is a definite potential. Um, but you know, the snow in the roofs and Michigan, we've Kinda changed code so layers high and shingles wouldn't be as heavy so you can only go up to two layers now. So the construction that we've had in Michigan, you know, should be able to hold up for all the snow weight that we have, um, but snow's not necessarily the only problem or looking at
Speaker 1:
3:33
I problem is
Speaker 3:
3:37
um, so what it does is if you have poor insulation or poor ventilation in your home, it will melt the snow off of your roof and the snow won't stay nice and fluffy and that will create ice dams at certain points in your roof that get a not as much. So when you're overhangs, if there's any weird additions that are not heated, those areas will start forming ice dams. And what most people don't realize about an ice dam, he, even if it's five degrees outside, you stand on top of that ice game. You're standing in ankle deep water
Speaker 1:
4:13
and that water control its way back up into my house, through the shingles are under the shingles.
Speaker 3:
4:18
Yeah. And shingles aren't waterproof. They're water shattered, so back in 2011, the state of Michigan decided that we needed an ice and water shield, so it's a waterproofing barrier. It's required by code and that goes to foot tash, the anterior wall, and we kind of thought behind your head is no matter how big the ice standard kits, it should be able to prevent it from coming in people's homes.
Speaker 1:
4:43
Okay, so what do folks do right now? You know today it's early. What do they need to be looking for and are there some things we can do to kind of keep our homes from having some of this water problem?
Speaker 3:
4:56
Yeah, you know, if it's the perfect storm for someone that might have a problem, they'd have something that was installed or their roofing before 2011, they would be starting to have ice dams developed towards the bottom of their roof. Now because they don't have that protection, what you want to do is you want to just break the dam and now you don't want to take it all the way down to the shingles or any of that. All you have to do is put a crack in it is that crack will allow the water to drain out and it won't come in your home.
Speaker 1:
5:29
Okay. So I don't have to get up there with a pick ax and ticket.
Speaker 3:
5:33
Yeah, you don't necessarily, you know, just enough to crack it, you know. Um, and you know, sometimes a landscapers or roofers are more than happy to help out with some of that paperwork.
Speaker 1:
5:45
Is there a certain spot in that ice dam where we should be cracking it? Like at the top or near the bottom or
Speaker 3:
5:52
I'm towards the top because you don't want to, like I said, we're not trying to damage anything. We're not to fight mother nature. We're just trying to help her out and get the water out of it. Um, so, you know, water's gonna rise up and then what we're trying to do is just get it to still over the top rather than spill over into your lane.
Speaker 1:
6:11
So what am I chipping? I mean, can I took that camera? I know that's problematic.
Speaker 3:
6:16
It is. And uh, you know, when I go out and do something I use my hammer is, that's what I'm comfortable using, but how you got to treat it as like it was a golf club so you're not swinging down at the roof, you're swinging parallel with the room.
Speaker 1:
6:33
Oh, that's a good point. Yeah.
Speaker 3:
6:35
And so as you go through it, which you might, you will be hitting nothing. It'll be air and you should be swinging away from yourself so you don't hurt yourself. But you also, like I said, don't swing down towards your home because you will damage the roof.
Speaker 1:
6:50
That's a very good point. What about people who have a metal roof potentially and not shingles?
Speaker 3:
6:56
Well, metal reus during a warm up like this, it's good to just considered do I have those ice blockers? Because as it warms up, all of that snow is going to slide off very quickly.
Speaker 1:
7:09
Okay. Now what about throwing salt up there or something like that to melt or pellets? My Dad said they sell. I'm thinking about just regular
Speaker 3:
7:19
a, a a engineer tell me that because the the evil we're running out of the ice. So this engineer told me out nylons, tie them into little, not stuff them with salt and throw those up. I am.
Speaker 1:
7:34
Wow. Okay. That's a good idea. Yeah, right.
Speaker 3:
7:38
Got same idea. You're going to create a concentrated area of salt that is going to break that ice. Damming create channels for water to flow.
Speaker 1:
7:47
All right matt, that's all the time we've got. I really appreciate the help because I got a feeling they're going to be people dealing with this this weekend. Matt, if anybody's got questions for you, how's the best way for them to get in touch?
Speaker 3:
7:58
Reach out to me at our office number is six. One, six, three, nine, two, three, three, seven, three, or go to our website. Sheriff guys on Muskegon Dot Com.
Speaker 1:
8:07
All right. Matt Williams from Sheriff Goslin roofing. Thanks so much for letting me call you today. Yeah, absolutely. Thanks for having me on. No problem. Take Care, Matt. Bye. Now. After the break, we're going to be in the studio with Derek Anderson from Amber Valley construction and he's going to tell us all how we can age in place, no matter how young we are in the stadium, helping you turn your house into your dream home. This is the REPCO like home improvement show presented by Benjamin Moore on news radio, wood 1,301. Oh, six, nine fm. Welcome back. I'm Dan Hanson, Betsy Thompson and I am very excited about this segment because we are interviewing
Speaker 4:
8:56
a gentleman who we actually saw at the. What was it, new home and renew mom and remodeling show in grand rapids. We heard part of his presentation and wow, I heard part and then you heard part and we both decided this was really good information. Yeah, we just didn't realize how good it might be. A lot of pressure, but we're in the studio with Derek Anderson, owner and false survivor. Right. I should've have said false. Survivor and owner of amber valley construction around time. Make sure to wear the fall survivor named Peggy just gets me. You get a badge.
Speaker 4:
9:32
People are confused. They have no idea. He made it through autumn and he said, well, we're talking about no direct story is false survivor and I guess let's just start with now. Before we get to that, why don't you tell us Derek, just a little bit about Amber Valley construction? Yeah, so we're a general remodeling company, a general contractor here in the grand rapids area. So we help people improve their homes inside and out. Our goal is to help homeowners love their homes and that can take many different forms depending on what their specific needs are. So inside, outside, upside downside, a structural repairs, kitchen remodeling, stuff like that. But I can come in and do a really nice kitchen remodel for a homeowner or something like that and we enjoy that process. We love producing a happy customers, but I really enjoy the times where we get to use some of the things that I've been through personally to be able to really help people that have real physical, legitimate needs in their homes.
Speaker 4:
10:27
So when you're talking about the things that you've been through, why don't you start by telling us that story because that's gonna get us into all of these other things that you do. Who is 2008? I had just finished a semester of Grad school. I was heading out to Utah for the summer. I was going to be working with some construction and helping out a family out there. And uh, so it was just kind of paying my way through Grad school was working during the summer and stuff like that. So, uh, on the way out there, I stopped in Colorado. I had a friend from college who was living in Denver at the time and so we decided to go mountain climbing, uh, that, uh, that day we actually done the exact same thing the year prior had done the same trip out to Utah the year before. And so we were going to do the same thing.
Speaker 4:
11:08
Was the called the fourth of July trails west of boulder in the Rocky Mountain National Park. So do you do a lot of climbing? I had done a couple of fourteeners and some just some scrambling, nothing like Tom Cruise, you know, I think it's, I forget which sporting good store, but they have a climbing thing I have done, which is I got a little bit up and then they get pick because you're afraid of heights. So anyway, you must not be. Not as much. No. Yeah. So we're heading out there. So there was, the snow pack was a little bit heavier than it was the year before, so we weren't able to get to the trail. So we're like, hey, let's just get out here, we'll start climbing up the side of a hill that looks like fun. Right. So instead of wasting the day, the trip. So we just decided to kind of just hang out over there.
Speaker 4:
11:48
So we started climbing. We got up really close to the top of where are, but basically the big hill, big hills out there, like mountains here. Right. So I grabbed a rock and it came loose and I fell backwards. I started tumbling down the side of the mountain of um, you know, I couldn't stop myself. What are you thinking as you're going? Are you even thinking? The only thing I remember like thinking is like trying to grab things, right? I felt like a, like a limp doll essentially. Just like a really had no control over things as I was moving so fast and bouncing essentially hitting things on the way down. And then I came to a stop. Uh, I landed. I, I didn't know my vision was blurred. I didn't, I knew I was in a lot of pain. I just, I didn't know what was up at that point.
Speaker 4:
12:34
I landed face up and so I'm just laying there and I'm really couldn't move. I had no, I just, yeah, it hurt. Oh my goodness. So your friend is watching all of this happen. So he's freaking out. He makes his way down to me. Um, it took him about five minutes or so to make his way down. She came down the conventional way. Yeah. The way the. Yeah. I came down the express as you wanted to be first and you were so yeah. So he gets down to me. I had fallen about 150 feet down the side of the mountain now it wasn't like a sheer cliff, straight dropdown, but tumbling about 150 feet hitting every rock on the way down. So, and then he, uh, he proceeded to try to help stabilize me where I was at. Right. So I would be like, I need you to take my left foot and move it to the right and he grabbed my right foot and move it to the left.
Speaker 4:
13:27
Well, he's like me, I'm not good with left and right. Right, right. If I'm on a ton of stress at that point. Right. So here we are, no cell phone signal. We're stuck there on the side of the mountain. I had landed on the edge of a 30 foot cliff and so we had no choice for him to leave me and go down and try to get. You hadn't hit that spot. You'd have been had I rolled another couple of feet, I would have told, you know, fallen. Consider another considerable distance. And who knows what would've happened when the outcome then spoiler alert, he survived.
Speaker 4:
14:02
Wow. So you're laying there after falling, 150 some feet were in the studio with Derek Anderson from Amber Valley construction, the owner of amber valley construction and false survivor. And he's telling us about his story. Just tumbled down 150 feet laying on your back. Your friend comes and helps you and moves the wrong feet the wrong direction because he's stressed out. What go, what happens from here? Yeah. So he goes down in kind providence. There was a nine one, one call box not far from where we were at. So he used that to, took the rescue team about 45 minutes to get back up to me and then they proceeded to stabilize me. It gave me an IV, a blue kangaroo is the thing that they wanted me to remember. So they wanted to make sure I wasn't fading in and out of consciousness to see if I had any sort of concussion symptoms or anything like that.
Speaker 4:
14:46
So in order to make sure I stayed there cognitively, blue kangaroo, you know, what's our phrase? Direct kangaroo. So while that team, there was a couple different teams, one was stabilizing me, making sure that, you know, I was there physically and mentally and all that kind of stuff. The other team went up above us and attached some ropes into the rock and they took this basket like thing where they lifted me upset and it suck the air out and it kinda wrapped itself around me. Still super painful, right? We didn't know the extent of my injuries at that time and they proceeded to repel me down the side of the mountain where they loaded me in an ambulance and then rolled me about a mile was the closest they could get a helicopter and then they airlifted me to denver from there. So Oh my gosh. So the airlift you to Denver, how many broken bones? Like a song where they're fearless.
Speaker 4:
15:35
So I had broken my right clavicle, which is in my shoulder and torn my little sign that for me because I. and I literally thought I can't ask what you picked up on that. Right. So that's shoulder tore my rotator cuff in this shoulder. I broke my left radius. Which is one of your forearm bones. Dislocated my left elbow. I'm broke my knee and my left knee and tore my medial collateral ligament, which is on the inside edge of the inside of the knee there. I shattered both of my ankles. So the Talus bone is in your feet there. So I shattered both of them. So my left one, I broke into 12 pieces and then the right one I broke into six pieces. So I was for several months non weight bearing on all four appendages. I literally could not move myself. So uh, getting a snack or taking myself to the bathroom.
Speaker 4:
16:30
All of those were nonstarters for me. Um, I was literally stuck in bed. I could operate a hospital bed which might. Somebody had kindly donated to us. We moved to the house after I got out of the hospital is five weeks there in Denver, uh, flew back here to the grand rapids area and basically had to move back in with my parents. At that point someone had donated the hospital bed and I could use that by how, you know, hospital beds, like the knees come up in the back, comes up, I could use that to reposition myself a little bit, but other than that, like I was, I was pretty much stuck where I was at and because I was non weight bearing on all four appendages like, like I said, there was going to the bathroom, getting something to eat, any number of those things like I was completely dependent at that time and that really gets us to where we wanted to go with the rest of this conversation because that experience propelled you at least to some extent has to have into what you do now.
Speaker 4:
17:27
Sure. So for example, I can get around and I can function fairly normally today and most people can't even tell by looking at me that I've had these injuries. Now I've recovered fairly well. You have bones fused in both my ankles and I have a little bit of a limp and I have some limited range of motion on my knee, my elbow, things like that. But I can get around fairly normally now, but I know that the needs that I had then as far as dependence and needing some extra functionality in the, in the home are going to be an increasing part of my future, right? So I already have arthritis in my foot already have knee pain from time to time and so those kinds of things are going to be an increasing part of who I am as I as I age and as my body and abilities deteriorate over time.
Speaker 4:
18:11
So yeah, the fact that I have been through that has given me a different perspective on people and aging in place, universal design, those kinds of things. So that can help people out in here's, here's what happens. As we age, our needs change, but our homes don't automatically change to meet our needs. So there's a need for remodelers to be able to come in and adapt homes to be able to meet people's needs longterm. So we want houses to be able to adapt with you as your needs change. And that's what we're going to get to in the next half. If you can hang with us over the break,
Speaker 1:
18:46
definitely a little bit longer than a normal one because there's a little more commercials here. You can wait to that. I can do it. Awesome. So we'll be back in the studio with Derek Anderson and just a minute, stay tuned if you want to take your diy skills up around the REPCO like home improvement show is here to give you a boost on news radio, wood 1,301. Oh, six, nine fm. And we're back. We are in the studio with full survivor and owner of Amber Bailey construction.
Speaker 4:
19:17
Derick Anderson. Derick, thanks for hanging with us over the break. Glad to do it. For anyone who's just tuning in. When Dan says fall survivor, he literally means like laying like from 150 feet down the mountain to a rocky ledge with both ankle shattered and broken clavicle, which Dan has to look up in the dictionary. He told me where mark should have a clock face. So He's been airlifted and he spent how many months laying in a hospital bed, not in the hospital but at home in a hospital. But yeah, so five weeks in the initial stent out there in Denver and then back home at the lowest point for me physically was in August, so my fall was in May, August, say I could barely lift my leg off the hospital bed because of muscle atrophy. I was non weight bearing on all four appendages so there was a lot of degradation that had gone on with me physically and over that course of time. So it's really took me two and a half years from my accident in May of 2008 before I was back to somewhat functioning physically. Again. That is incredible because that's all long road back to getting to who you were, I guess you would say, but are you really the same after that? You said you have arthritis hurtful a lot. Betsy don't climb mountains anymore.
Speaker 4:
20:40
Well, it's just, it's different in your needs changed slightly. I guess that's what we want to talk about because you are more aware of how our needs change as we age or you know, for younger people like us when we sit here and think, well aging, that's a ways off. But I don't think so, but you were how old when this happened? I was 22 years old. Right. So what? Twenty two year old sits there and thinks this is something that, you know, I mean not everyone is as lucky as you and not everyone can come back as well as you did and then you suddenly have these changes that have to happen. Right. So I guess what have you learned this and how you've applied that to what you do at Amber Valley construction? Yeah. So our goal is to be able to help people live safe, independent and functional in their homes.
Speaker 4:
21:31
If someone's been in an accident, like you just said, now their physical needs are very different from how their house is set up. Right? So there is a need for remodelers to be able to come in and to modify those structures in a way that makes that house safe and functional for them to meet their physical needs. So is that something that you guys go around doing or are you trying to be proactive in the sense of getting people aware of this as they build new homes? So that's one of the proactive part of it is something that we are trying to do the most of what we do is kind of on the back end of it though right now. So someone for example, a project we did here just in the last year, there was a gentleman he was getting, he was elderly, he was no longer safe in his home.
Speaker 4:
22:18
You could not take a bath because he didn't have the ability or the mobility to be able to get an out of a tub. So one of the things we're able to do is we're able to pull that tab out, put a low barrier shower pan in, and now he gets to stay at home with his family. He had two options before that go into a nursing home or not take a shower. Right? So now he gets to take a shower and he gets to stay at home with his wife. And so those are the kinds of things that we're able to do on modifying structures to be able to help that man and help others stay safe, independent and functional in their homes. So what are some of the biggest things that you look for, like, you know, okay, let's say someone is suddenly in a wheelchair, they have an accident, they're in a wheelchair.
Speaker 4:
23:00
I know this because my father in law at one point had this problem. Suddenly he's in this wheelchair and the house was tiny and there were walls everywhere and he couldn't get around. What types of barriers are there that you have to go through and modify? Are there certain areas of the home that it's more prevalent? Yeah. So there's a few things that can be done right off the bat. So ramps into the house. That's a very, that's a very simple one. The others are widening doorways, so a lot of older homes have 28, 26 or 24 inch doors that is impossible with a wheelchair. And so the standard for a wheelchair accessible doorways 36 inches. So we can come in and we can widen that doorway. We can, um, create radiuses for wheelchairs to be able to navigate. Typically we're, we're looking for a circle that has five feet of area and at any point in that circle to be able to turn and rotate that wheelchair around, so those are the kinds of things on the design side that we're we look at to be able to make sure that that's accessible and functional for people that have those needs.
Speaker 4:
24:05
Basically the idea behind this is universal design. That's what it's called, right? Why don't you give our listeners just a little bit of an idea if they haven't already put it altogether. Universal design, what exactly is that? Yeah. Universal design dictionary definition is the design of buildings, products or environments to make them accessible to all people regardless of age, disability or other factors, so it doesn't really matter what your ability is. You may have no ability, you might be a quadriplegic. Our goal is to be able to make that safe even functional for you and your longterm care needs. So I've seen things like door knobs, for example, you know, we've all got the standard door knobs and then now there's lever knobs which make it a little easier and then there are doors that open automatically, which is the next step towards. So there's a lot of very simple things that can be done to make things accessible for people because as we age, our needs change and our abilities decrease and change.
Speaker 4:
25:06
Our goal with universal design is to be able to make small changes to existing structures that make that suitable longterm. So even think about in your kitchen right there, the standard is like a knob on a drawer. As we age, our dexterity and our ability to grip things decreases. So we're going to say instead of a non, let's put a handle on there so you can stick your hand right down through that and pull it out without having to grip on it. Like you just mentioned, with door knobs gripping that door knob can become difficult. You know, all of us here in this room are still young and that's hard for us to fathom, but there are people everyday that have difficulty grasping and pulling on those things, so instead of a Knob, we're going to go with a handle or a lover, so it's we can use gravity a little bit more and push instead of trying to grip.
Speaker 4:
25:55
Another simple thing would be a toggle switch right? For your. Your light switch up and down as the standard one. They have the paddle switches where you can even hit that with the end of your cane if you needed to, to be able to turn that on. Right? You can be sitting in your wheelchair from across the room and poke it in turn, be able to turn it on or a lot easier. But what's really cool about this is that it's universal in nature. It's meant for any scenario, correct. It's not meant to be because nobody wants that. What does that look? Institutions, yeah. We don't want to make your home look like you live in a nursing home, and so that's the goal of this is to create good design that looks great, that's appealing visually, but still functional good design is universal and good design that is universal is hidden in the background so that the average person coming into it doesn't even necessarily know that this is a universal design space, but for example, we're going to take your electrical outlets and we're going to move them up from 16 inches to 18 inches so you don't have to bend over as far and we're going to take your switches.
Speaker 4:
26:55
We're going to move them down from like a standard 42 inch height. Then we're going to move them down to like 38 inches so that if you are in a seated position you can reach that a lot easier. So is that something that you come in and will help us assess the situation? Sometimes? Sometimes, yes. So sometimes we'll come out and we'll do a consultation if there's an injury involved. Often time there's an occupational therapist that we work with that will come and do a home evaluation for them. They're licensed and trained specifically to help people with these kinds of needs and specifically we use them when there's been an injury or an accident or a very specific illness involved that brought them to the point where an occupational therapist is needed. They are licensed and trained in how to do a complete home evaluation based off of your needs, so that's one thing that we collaborate with and coordinate on that side.
Speaker 4:
27:42
For the average homeowner who's just looking for additional adaptability in their home, yet we can come in and do those assessments for them and help them think through big picture. How can we modify the structure to set you up for success long term in your home? The reason being none of us are chomping at the bit to go into an assisted living or in a nursing home. We want to maintain our independence. We want to stay safe and functional in our own homes and that's what universal design can do. Not all of these things are expensive, so all of them cost more than others, but we can come in and we can make a few simple changes that allow you to maintain that independence and functionality in your own home with your own family. Right? Derek, we are coming to the end of this segment and I have a few more questions would like to ask, so we're going to do a home improvement show
Speaker 5:
28:33
first and we're going to ask you to stick around for a third segment. Do you think you can stick with us over the break? Definitely. All right. We'll be back in the studio with Derek Anderson. After these messages. Stay tuned
Speaker 1:
28:49
if you want to take your diy skills up around the REPCO, like home improvement show is here to give you a boost on news radio, wood 1,301. Oh, six, nine fm and we're back Betsey's back. Garrett gets bashed his back for the third segment, which we've never done before, which is fun. It is fun. That's not the only other piece paper at third segment. Nope. There's just so much here and as we keep digging into it, we're talking about universal design basically about in this instance when we remodeled our homes or getting our homes prepared for situations that we may not expect that are going to come as we age to make sure that we can stay in our homes and live comfortably. Nobody wants to go to a nursing home when those things happen
Speaker 4:
29:36
or if you have an accident in your family and all of a sudden there's an urgent need to modify your so you can bring someone back home from the hospital. Don't realize all the things that are complications from opening doors to you name it, drawer polls. Even. You talked about just the knobs on drawers and kitchens can be something that's tough to work with in certain situations with certain disabilities. So Derek, in the last little bit that we've got here, I'm wondering why don't you just take us through some of the rooms in the house and just practically let's all wrap our brains around what kinds of things we can do to make our homes more universally designed. I guess let's say definitely so big picture real quick, we're looking for safety, independence and functionality in your home. So when first safety, the most dangerous room in the house is the bathroom slips and falls because of water were around as a builder, right?
Speaker 4:
30:30
I have to take into consideration a tempered glass anywhere where it's within certain number of feet of a water source, those kinds of things, but for people that have limited abilities and mobilities and dexterity concerns, the bathroom is a is a huge pressure point for us to be able to make that area safe independently accessible for them and functional. So when we think about the bathroom specifically, so grab bars are a big thing that we do. A common grab bar size is 24 inches. Problem with that is that studs are 16 inches on center. So if we're going to do a bathroom remodel, I'm going, we're going to say, hey, you know what? You might need a grab bar right here, right now, but in six months, a year, two years, five years, you might need additional grab bars or grab bars in different locations because your needs have changed during that time.
Speaker 4:
31:18
So if we have the opportunity to help someone with a bathroom remodel, it has some of these needs were going to say, let's put plywood on the walls all over the bathroom. That way we don't have to worry about this long term. We're going to have something solid to be able to anchorage you grab bar into. So be able to. You being able to do that. We have anchors that we can anchor, grab bars into drywall, but at the end of the day, do you want to be pulling on that though? So installing plywood throughout the bathroom is a great way to be able to just make that room adapt with you as your needs change other places in the bathroom, the Tub, right? So if you have a tub like a soaking tub or a Jacuzzi Tub, something like that, transferring in and out of that on a narrow ledge can be quite dangerous when your abilities and dexterity decreases.
Speaker 4:
32:03
So instead of like a four inch ledge right around the perimeter of that, let's make that 12 inches, 18 inches wide, just a little bit more tile, takes up a little bit more room, but now I can sit down on that safely and then move my legs in an out while I'm seated in that position so that I can transfer in and out of that bathtub safely. So little things like that, giving you a little bit more perimeter around the bathtub really goes a long way. Continuing in the bathroom, a curbless shower right now, stepping over to get into a tub. I can do that even with my injuries. That's not an issue for me. But longterm is that going to be the same? Absolutely not. So low barrier or curbless showers. Even if I'm in a wheelchair, I can be a move right into that.
Speaker 4:
32:49
So how does that work with the water? It just slopes. Yeah, so if we're making a wet room or the entire bathroom into an area where water can be on the floor in the entire space, there are different manufacturers that make different bases for tile to be able to go on the slope, the water to drains, uh, that get all that water out, uh, that, uh, you can just literally just roll right into the bathroom and not even if you're. Even if you're able to walk in now, we don't have a step that we have to get over top of that. It's very difficult for some people and they'll see that a lot in design. Like if you look through magazines, you see a lot of showers that are like that without even a step over. My mom wants one of those. That's why I know.
Speaker 4:
33:33
So that's the bathroom. What other rooms in the last little bit that we've got here, what are some of the things in some of the more important rooms that we'd want to focus on after bathrooms? Kitchens where we spend a lot of our time doing our food prep and entertaining and those kinds of things. So being able to bring things down to you as we age and our abilities, decreased, climbing up on that stool to reach something on the top shelf of a cabinet becomes much less appealing or attractive to do everything I get from any shelf.
Speaker 4:
34:03
So instead of making you get on that stool to climb up there, what if we could bring the contents down to you, but we'll butler, wouldn't that be awesome? Pretty much so we can install an insert into a cabinet or that will. You can pull it out and everything comes to you. Same thing on the lower cabinets. Instead of reaching up, it will bring it up. So it's like a tray that kind of. Exactly. Oh, so it's like that spicer. Heck I was talking about that. I wanted. That pulls down toward a few episodes ago. Yes, a little spice rack that flips down. It's similar in that regard, but it will do exactly this and will. So in order for a structure to be considered universal design, you have to be able to bring 50 percent of the contents to you. And that's part of that.
Speaker 4:
34:44
If we can bring this stuff to you instead of you having to reach up or climb up to go get it, you're a lot more safe in your home being able to do that. And we even things like your oven, right? If picture yourself sitting in a wheelchair having to open an oven with a 25 pound Turkey, how's that? How are you going to reach across that hot oven door and then be able to pull that out? You don't even have to be on a wheelchair. The solution, you can do a side door oven that opens from the side that doesn't look like you're living in an institution or you're living in a nursing home, but just changing the direction that your door opens on your oven can go a long way for safety. So what about doors between rooms like pulling the door open in a wheelchair? I said, imagine that's complicated. So back when I was in a wheelchair, uh, the room that I was in open from the inside, they were French doors. So that helped a little bit, but like have you ever been in a wheelchair and tried to open an insane door? It is a pain in the butt.
Speaker 4:
35:45
First you have to open the door a little bit, but now the door hits your wheelchair because you have to back up a little bit, but you kind of, you can't back up too far because now you can't reach the door handle anymore. So you kind of have to have this seven step turn process in order to do that. So instead of having swinging doors, we can install pocket doors so that you don't have to worry about that swing and you upgrade a little bit to a ball bearing pocket door so you know that the mechanism is going to last and then it's going to be there for a long time and you're not going to have squeak, squeak, squeak type issues. Those are the kinds of things that don't make it look like you live in an institution, but make your home theory safe, functional and allow you to maintain your independence longer.
Speaker 4:
36:24
It just seems like if you're doing any remodeling, this is something definitely to think about. I know we've only got seconds left, but we had a friend of the show who's been on. We interviewed her. She built a house in her seventies, right? Her and her husband are in their seventies and they built all of that. With this in mind. They were very smart because they wanted to stay in the house. They didn't want to be moved out, so the shower is such that they can. All of that was built into the plan at the carwash, wanted it so they could get a wheelchair in there if necessary. So I would think any work that I think about doing this has changed how I would look at anything I do around the house. Don't have to be old to think about this. You can be right where you are right now and if you love where you live and you want to maintain your independence, there are very simple, practical things that you can do while you're remodeling to remodel with the future in mind that are going to set you up for success.
Speaker 4:
37:19
Safety and independence in your home for a long time. Excellent. Derek, if our listeners want to get in touch with you at amber valley construction about some of this stuff, if they've got questions or they just want to get you out to the house and maybe help them through a project, how do they best get in touch with you? So a couple of different ways to do that. Our website is just request a consultation right there from the homepage and we'd be more than happy to have a conversation with you and see how we might be able to help you with some of this. So Amber Valley construction.com is our website and then you can email me Derek, d, e r e k@ambervalleyconstruction.com. All right. Derek Anderson from Amber Valley construction owner. False survivor. Thanks so much for being here today. Thanks for having me. And that's going to do it betsy. It's time to get out and take a look at our roofs for truffle salt up there. Right? Well in pantyhose nylons, do you call them? It's about the same thing is it just feels like a weird word to say, well, am I allowed to say it went out with the seventies? Depends on how old you are and what term you use. Well, anyway. Anyway, those stretchy stockings, that would've been somewhat shear that women were and actors. Those would be leotards.
Speaker 4:
38:33
All the salt that I've got into the unit tar that I
Speaker 1:
38:36
wear on the rough. It'll melt some snow burnout, some eyeballs to. Anyway, I'm Dan Hanson. Betsy Thompson. Thanks for listening. Oh, he don't even know what a unit is it bad.
×

Listen to this podcast on