Are you Ready to Roll

FROGMEN & LAWMEN

August 25, 2020 Paul Marrick/Jesse Clay Season 1 Episode 11
Are you Ready to Roll
FROGMEN & LAWMEN
Chapters
Are you Ready to Roll
FROGMEN & LAWMEN
Aug 25, 2020 Season 1 Episode 11
Paul Marrick/Jesse Clay

JESS AND PAUL DISCUSS SOME OLD LAWMEN AND FROGMEN AND SOME OF THE INSPIRATION THEY PROVIDED THAT LEAD TO THERE EVENTUAL CAREERS.  

Show Notes Transcript

JESS AND PAUL DISCUSS SOME OLD LAWMEN AND FROGMEN AND SOME OF THE INSPIRATION THEY PROVIDED THAT LEAD TO THERE EVENTUAL CAREERS.  

Retired law enforcement, officer security, expert and award winning storyteller. Paul Merrick, along with his cohost, Jesse Clay, former Navy seal, and four time heavyweight committee, world champion together. We'll discuss the broad array of current events using their unique backgrounds to further dissect each story. The only question you have to ask yourself is, are you ready to roll? I don't know, but I've been told that these two guys are really old. I hear their views are very bold, but they believe the truth will hold. So sit right back and enjoy the show because these two guys are ready to roll sound off wound to sound off three, four sound off long two, three, four. Let's roll. Hello, Jesse. Ready? Roll. Hey, let's roll. Paul, how you doing buddy? Good man. Interesting times. Interesting times. Uh, we can, I mean, I think we should let everybody know tonight. We're going to talk a little bit about since our law enforcement and military, uh, personnel have been just getting it left and right. And we're talking about a couple, maybe three people that. Probably stood out to us, maybe drove us a little bit to do what we did for career. Um, a little bit, not necessarily lighter side, but made the better side of military and law enforcement story tonight. I think, I think it's do, I think there's been too much of the other. And, uh, so we're gonna talk about a few really interesting and exemplary industries rules. Um, but before we get there, uh, I don't know. If the rest of our friends out there have noticed, but it is hard to get just about anything nowadays. It seems like everything's back locked. I can tell you in the construction industry, we are being lied to on a daily basis, you know, Oh, we'll have it in the week. And then two weeks later, it doesn't show up three weeks later. It doesn't show up. So now we have a bunch of customers who are upset. That. And I'm, I'm not talking about big items. I'm talking about everyday items from like windows siding. Um, let's see, uh, roof, a lot of the roofing material now. Sure. Granted, a lot of it comes from China, but last I looked, we had warehouses full of stuff, and now all of a sudden the warehouses are empty and nobody knows where it is. Oh yeah. But the prices are going up. So, yeah, by the way, find a man by the way. And what does that do to that already have a contract with somebody for a certain price and then, Oh, you know, it's like, it doesn't, that doesn't work very well. Yeah. No, not really, but you know, it is what it is. It's feast or famine. Well, the wife and I just, over the weekend just hit a couple of stores looking for simple things that, you know, maybe some shirts and pants or whatever. And even that, like, I remember going into one of the department stores over here, that new mall, which by the way, is starting to look like a ghost town. Um, and they had the same stuff in there. They had like three months ago. I don't know why they didn't sell it. Yeah. They didn't sell it. That's number one. But, but. But you think usually they would rotate it or something there's I mean, granted I wear a 15, so it's hard to find shoes like to go into this, like the Nordstrom's rack, because sometimes they have things in the back wall and you can, if I find something, even if I don't need them, I just buy them because of hard to get usually. But there's nothing back there now. I mean, just like shoes, it's really weird, really weird. And I, I gotta wonder, like, what's that gonna do to commerce overhaul after what, if you can't get what you need to do the job and it's not just us obviously. Then what does that do to the overall economy when you can't perform? That's scary. Yeah. Well, people start losing faith. We become Russia. Yeah. I don't want to be Russia. I mean minus the bottle, I liked the bucket, but other than that, it's better. Vodkas is out there. Trust me. Yeah, there is out there is, we've had a few of them. Yeah. And, uh, the last thing I knew, the, one of the best pockets came out of France. Yeah. And, you know, I heard rumors that a Costco has the building next to them and then make pretty good the price. I'm just saying, you know, just volume discounts. So, you know, so Kirkland, you know, should be giving us a kickback here on something that's not going to happen. Kickback is like, what are we get at the end of the year on our card, right? Yeah. Oh, it was $50 have fun. Yeah. Well there. That's going to last me like three minutes in Costco. That's like one, one case of what not say my wife. Cause I didn't go to Costco. Did you to get that? I go, yeah. Why? She goes, because we didn't need three cases. We only need one, but three cases are always way more fun. I know. Well, my, my stepdad, he he's the worst or the best. He will go to Costco. And he will buy by the case to the point where he has to park his car outside so he can fill his grudge while the cases of tuna and beans and paper goods and everything else. And I'm like, like, Papa, what are you? What are you doing that for? Same frog. Uh, originally Italy, he's a, he's a retired commercial fishermen, a Italian commercial fishermen. And, um, but he loved his living in San Pedro's, practically isn't here. So, um, and I said, what are you gonna do all that? I think it's cool that you walk in there. It's like walking into a store. Right. He goes, cause you never know. And you know what, he's right. You don't you months ago this man in the world, If you're selling toilet paper. Yeah. What do you need? I got it right here. I've got it right here. What do you need? I could pay for goods. I pay for products. I got what you paid for the house. No problem. Yeah. Carpentry Miami. When you're done, I got the paper towels to wipe it all up. Double absorbent. Yeah. It's true. Out of China. Maybe he's got it. He's got it all. Um, and the only other thing today, I was. So I'm driving through the parking lot of the same, like all these stores are I'm. Okay. Go on, you know, like five miles an hour and here's this car pulling out right in front of me. And at first I thought, I'm sure she's probably on her phone because she's not paying attention. No, she's looking so she's pulling out, she's going South. I'm going West. She's looking to her left and talking to her friend while she's pulling out right in front of me. I mean, if you're gonna pull out in front of somebody, at least look the way you're going, not the way you're not going, are you just that? Even from, you know, and then you honk to let them know you're there and they look at you like, well, why are you honking at me for what's your problem? Yeah. Yeah. I'm going to hit you. Yeah, but I guess that's okay. Yeah. Same thing when you're there highway, you ever noticed that and you're on the highway and people. They ended up being like this, like this flock of sheep, one person's going about six miles under the speed limit, whether it's fine. There's no reason not to do that. Right. Um, and so we're just starts falling because of like sheep and not really paying attention. And as soon as you decide, like, well, this is crazy. I mean, you go to pass him. Everybody speeds up. Yeah. Look at going North, coming from castle rock or Colorado Springs. Exactly. You'll see traffic slowed down. And then if you look a mile or two ahead, it's open. So tell me what's going on. People just not paying attention. Yeah. Maybe they can't afford it. I don't know. I can't afford it or they can't afford the attention. That's like, okay, now that's a dad joke. Yeah. That's a dad joke. I got a kind of a R rated dad joke. I remember a friend of mine told me one time. Like he, he grew up up at the same era as my father. So that was, I'm guessing your dad too, probably during the depression, right? Yep. And, um, he said back in those days, we're so poor. We couldn't afford toys or anything. We just had to play with ourselves. This is in Christ. No East Los Angeles. Oh, I can see that. Oh my gosh. Anyway, uh, so we were talking about it before the show last couple of days, and there's a few people that we thought it would be interesting to discuss and talk about their background and. Everything they've been involved with because, uh, some pretty interesting, I don't even want to say characters. Just, um, know their characters. Yeah. I guess they are. Yeah. But individuals that, I mean, their accomplishments, um, led us to want to be at least a little bit like them in some ways, not everything, but, you know, just go out there and yeah. You know, be the, we don't like bullies. Right. So we're going to go out there and yeah. Bullies and they're really good at that. Um, and, uh, so anyway, let's talk about your, uh, one of your, uh, I guess frogman that, uh, from the past that you kind of may have looked up to and thought, you know, Hey man, there's so many, all of them, Vietnam vets from Tom Guild. To mass chief ULI to a root mass, chief Rudy Bosch, jeez guys that would never leave a man. You know what I mean? Yeah. That's uh, yeah, the whole, he thought he could worst stories or anything. And there's really, there's really not much I can talk about, uh, on doubt playing without having a scotch in the cigar. So if we end up in that position, changing the names, so the innocent are protected. No. I mean, uh, I look at, uh, probably one of the guys that I look up to or admire the most right now. His name is Glen Jones and Glen Jones is he owns, uh, he was a frogman vacuum, Vietnam. He's our bullfrog out here in Colorado. He's just one of, for all frog is senior enlisted. Okay. Okay. So he's a senior enlisted frogman. Alright. So he's been, he's the oldest living frog in the area. Wow. Well kinda, there's another, there's a couple guys here that are in their nineties, Glen. I believe it was in his eighties or close to 80 and he's just, he does ultra marathons. He, he runs a very successful business. I mean, he got out of seal team. Went to, um, uh, um, Cal state Fullerton graduated from there, met his wife, um, newer two days then married her. She, she just passed, uh, about two years ago of cancer, the most awesome woman beside my mom I've ever known of that era. She was just, uh, and just. You know, you're, you're around some people and you can just feel the love and you can feel that they would finish each other's sentences. Or, um, I went with them as support to do super frog a couple of times, which is a half marathon or half. Yeah. Half marathon, 10 mile or five miles swam it's and then a bike ride. So it's 26 mile bike ride. So it's a. That's true. Yeah. Yeah. And, uh, he just, he's a hell of a swimmer, um, at his age. And I, and I hate saying that, but, um, he's put a lot of miles on him, legs and the knees and the episode shoulders. And to the point he had surgery and a couple months after surgery swam Alcatraz, that's like, what? I mean. He's now from Alcatraz back to the Bay. I mean, back to Frisco or what, what, what, what, what kind of swim is that? It's you swim from the bridge golden gate bridge. I believe that's where it is. Or just outside that you swim to Alcatraz, you pick up a coin or I forget what it was he got and then you swim from Alcatraz back. Yeah. Does he have to leave? Wear a vest. Alexa, you are full wetsuit. Okay. But, uh, I mean, he's done super frog. He's gone. He's was the, uh, um, uh, what's the, uh, rock and roll. What's the big triathlon. Oh, in Hawaii. Ironman. Yeah. He qualified for iron man is the vision he was for the 80 year olds. I think he was in the top five in the world. And he's like, he's just a beast. I mean, the dude he owns, he worked for, um, Sears and Roebucks, you know, back in the day, if he worked for them for 30 years, you know, and Chicky, his wife was a, uh, Was it elementary school teacher and everybody loved her. So he moved around and she supported him. And you know, it doesn't matter if it's the husband making the moves in his career or the wife making the moves in their career. If you don't have somebody behind you supporting you, then it's for nothing. You know what I mean? It's not, it's not, you gotta be a team player. And some people don't understand that. No. And on every team, there's, there's a captain. There's a coach and there's an assistant and that's how it works. But anyway, so he and his wife were friends of mine for have been friends of mine for years, 20 years. And he's just a hell of a frogman. He embodies everything they're supposed to be. He left, um, Sears and Robox and opened up a furniture business and he owns a furniture business. His philosophy is the same philosophy. Sears and Roebuck used to be where the customer is always. Right. No matter how wrong the customer may be, he does is he does his best to make sure that they, they feel like they got. More than what they came in for. And he does that in everything he does, excuse me, the smoke and allergies or, or the smoke and, uh, from all the far, as far as really bothering my allergies today. So I may be some little stopped up. So just off the side, there's some kind of, I think it's the mic. It's touching something. That's like clicking a lot over there. Something I can hear it on the, just, if you can double check, I don't know. Is it maybe is a touching, like something on the table or something, or it's, I've never heard that sound before now. You don't have to, you don't have to get naked for us. I'm just saying how about now? I think it's better. Yeah. Along those lines, we've been on hold. With our orders, uh, ordering some new mix, uh, and we can't get, yeah. So we apologize. It's going to get a lot better over the next month or so, but there, there, again, we've been, I mean, we've had these things on order since before we started and yeah. So anyway, uh, but yeah, I'm sorry to interrupt you just make it easier for him to hear us. That's all. Yeah. He's um, he's he was the guy, he's the guy, he's one of we, you know, I just talked to him today after a long time and he had shoulder surgery and had some other stuff done, but you know what he's from that generation where it was not, if I can do it it's how can I do it? Right. And we don't see that much anymore, or everybody has an excuse for why they can't make it. Everybody has an excuse, why they can't do something. And instead of putting in the energy, putting in the time, make it happen. Right. Don't just, don't just accept. No, like E like Thornton, Mike Thorton, and then Tommy Norris who are medal of honor winners, seal team guys who won. You know, Tommy Norris got saved by Mike sorter. Mike Thornton was the only medal of honor winner who saved a medal who saved a of winter. So if you know the story and when they come to Colorado, I haven't done a lot of the events that I do. And they're just awesome people just to sit down and to be in their presence and talk to them for a couple minutes. And then they, and then it's like, well, you know, The normal people, right? These are the guys you go, can I sit here? Yeah. You don't ask you to sit out. If they get up and move them, you know, you weren't supposed to be there. Do you know a little bit about that? How he saved him a little bit about that story? Yeah. That's a, that's a launch story. That's that was a firefight. And he was left down and bad Juju. The guy, nobody should've made it out of there. They both did. They both did the whole pretty much the whole platoon dead, but you just said they shouldn't have, and that's what people need to realize just because they shouldn't have doesn't mean you can't. Yeah. Bingo. You're looking there's over a hundred and some of them and 17 guys. So that's even though, right. I mean, that's, that's about fair. 150 would have been even a hundred, but back in the day they didn't have enough ammo, but yeah, it's a different, it's a different deal, you know, it's, like I said, it's a different deal. It's kind of like, you know, it's again, I gotta say this one more time. The guys that, that who I knew and the teams that were dog handlers in Afghanistan, Iraq, and even, and I hate to mention it even some of the army guys, um, Man, the dog was a whole nother level of, of confidence when you were going in somewhere and you, you didn't know if there's a bad guy or not. And drones, couldn't give you a good signature on how many folks were around. You send that dog in there, bro. Yeah, no doubt about it. Yeah. There was a bad guy to be bit. He was gotta get nibbled on. He let you know where he was too. Huh? Oh yeah. He, sir. Job is what they do. And, uh, and I, and I got to mention it again, the boys, I know it, that canine and all the other canine groups that are, that are helping our, our warriors overseas and our military law enforcement. Here state side guys are doing a hell of a job. I can't say enough. And again, you know, kind of heading back into that genre. I ran into a cop today out at one of the historical sites we're doing, we're doing a renovation of a 1930s, uh, gymnasium. And I ran into one of the local cops and, you know, he had his mask on looking around, you take a bite. He took, took us back, ask off, take a bite of the Apple, chewing out it, looking at it, put the mask as a, he didn't notice I was standing there. So I stood there for about five minutes and looked at him. And then he, he heard me move my foot and he turned and looked over and they said, that's okay. I'm Corona free. That easily laughed. And we talked for about 25 minutes and it was, it was really disheartening to see him, you know, going, we talked about the whole situation, right. He basically came out and said, it's only a couple of bad apples. Right. You know, and what other facet of life. Do we persecute everybody over a couple of guys making mistakes or doing stupid stuff. We don't. And it's the one ones that you fully should consider that is, uh, in Congress, no politics, period. I don't care what Congress, president, whoever, whoever, I mean just, you know, but they can do whatever they want, but you get a guy out there who, or a man or a woman who has to make a decision in three seconds. And most of the classes are pretty good to session. Yeah. Yeah. And then the, and then you got a few that, you know, either they made the wrong decision, they shouldn't have been there to begin with, but it's so few, you know, they get all the attention, they get all the attention. That's what we're trying to change. And now we're talking a little bit about, probably more than norm, but some that stand out, people that actually put their life on the line for us throughout the years, throughout the last few hundred years, actually like we're talking to you today. And I said, you know, I don't think. I've heard a lot about this guy lately, but it always kind of my me attention. His name was bass Reeves. Um, he was is basically the first, um, lack African-American man, whatever you want to call. Yeah. Whatever you can call, I'll tell you what you can call me. Calm badass guy. I mean a former slave escaped. I hit out in, uh, what is now, you know, was the Oklahoma territory or whatever at the time, uh, until, until he could actually go back to Arkansas after the 13th amendment, we've easily left, he'd be put back in slavery again, right. While he was there. I mean, smart guy while he was there, he learned all the customs of the different tribes. Learn their language. And then when, uh, in 1865, when things change able to move around wherever we wanted, he was one of the first us marshals. They hired to work that territory and they picked him because he knew how to track. He could speak the languages. He knew the terrain area really well. That man is credited with over 3000 arrests in his career. 3000. I mean, we're talking like, you know, he can call and say, Hey, okay, rolling the car, the armored vehicle or whatever. It's like him, his sidearm, probably a rifle and a horse thousand guys. Right. I think he ended up taking out well killing. I should use the Ruddick break term or whatever. I think it's 11 or something. So that's pretty good odds considering know it was just him and the bad guys. Right? Yeah. That's crazy. He, uh, he was so defined about, and that's what I think we find with, like, we were just talking about your frogman. There's right. There's wrong. I don't care what the deal is. We're going to do the right thing, right? Yeah. He had 11 children. One of them was wanted because I guess he killed his wife or whatever, and they were going to send somebody else to get them. And he says, give me the writ. Yeah, which is basically the warrant and says, uh, I'll take care of it. And he brought his own son in the face trial, which he did. And then eventually, I think years later got up and I mean, it just shows his determination just to always no one's above or below the law. Every everything's the same. How about a little thing called integrity? Oh my God. Yeah. Something. Most people don't have these days. You ever see his picture in like online or something. If you look really carefully, it looks like it's imprinted into his forehead. Integrity. That's the kind of guy he was. And, um, And those, no, what I really said is I want to be a frog man. They didn't, they didn't have those back then only kidding. Only kidding people, calm down truly would have been a good frog, man. Why wouldn't a great frog. Yeah. But, uh, I mean, so it's amazing to know these are the kinds of people that. I mean growing up, like my dad was a cop and that really kind of inspired me too and everything you want to, that's why we that's, it's the same thing. That's why you I'm sure did what you did. And I did what I did because we don't like bullies. We want to kind of give the upper hand to the good guy, you know? Oh, I personally joined because I liked seeing shit blow up. That's true. And it's always fun. You know, I hunted for a long time and I didn't need a tag or a license. Hey, you know, well, you kind of had a license, but it wasn't the salient license. I just didn't need to tag. Don't need to keep numbers. They give numbers. I mean, come on. No, but I mean, that's, that's why it's like, it's like, like you're growing up one day and going, I want to grow up and be an asshole, you know, that's not, that's not how you do it, you know, Congress. Yeah. Obviously the Senate, I'm sorry. Threats, threats, threats, threats. Um, but I mean, I mean, just, if you can imagine for a moment thinking back way before they had, I just got to go back to the skin real quick. So Before you had radios before you had where you could call in for backup, you're in the middle of nowhere and you're going against guys that, you know, it's not like, well, right now we have a little unrest anyway, but it's like, it's not like, okay, well I'm the long man. They didn't didn't. So what if you can't catch me? If you're not better than me, I'm going to try to kill you. I mean, that's what it was like, you know, it's not big help. Yeah. Yeah. And he, um, he worked for like, I want to say 35 or 40 years doing that same job. Unbelievable. Unbelievable. Oh, now here's the coolest part. So, um, because of where he was originally from and where he did a lot of his work and his family was from, there are some historians who believe we can't prove one way or the other now who believe that the original radio show, the long ranger is actually based on his life. Really? Yes. So where the hell of Tonto come from? I don't know, but you know, that show was okay. That it was kind of like mutual of Omaha wild kingdom, right. Because lone ranger, I mean, he's always all dressed, all dandy up and everything and, you know, hold it and pull his gun out while Tonto is doing all the crap work and catching the guys and tying them all up. And, you know, I, I tracked him just keeping the Brown man down, just like, Oh, mutual of Omaha. Right. Well, Merlin is up in the elec air, conditioned, helicopter, you know, whatever his name was, Todd, what was his name, John or whatever. He was wrestling, the wrestling, the alligator, you know what I mean? Let's talk about insurance, you know, so I mean, and that's kind of what that show was like, but no, there are quite a few people who believe that it actually was based on his life. So it's quite possible. The best Rees was the original lone ranger. I think that's really cool. I couldn't go to sleep last night. So I had to turn on a movie and I was like, the baiting went downstairs. I said, Oh, I don't know, Irishman highway men. Ooh. It was close. It was close. It was cool. That's always a good thing. Yeah. But, uh, and then it reminded me now there were a few things in the movie that aren't quite. Exactly right. But there were quite a few things that were pretty close for what I can remember. And, you know, the Texas ranger has been getting a lot of crap lately for things that may or may not have happened, you know, 150. Yeah. More than that years ago. And in any organization, like we talked about before are probably things that happened that nobody or they wish they hadn't happened. Right. But this. Frank Hamer, who, um, was basically the lead Texas ranger since there were no Texas Rangers at the time, things to moth Ferguson being governor of Texas at the time, uh, hints, the movie highway man, uh, was brought back from retirement to go get Bonnie and Clyde. And they did him and his partner gulp did that. Um, Because they were good trackers. They knew, they knew how bad guys thought they knew. And with all the modern technology they had right. At the same modern technology now, 1937 back then, right. Those two guys were able to do with the FBI or to be else couldn't do, because they just knew how bad guys thought. Yeah. Yep. And to their credit, like with hammer, he is credited during his. Career with stopping. I want to say it was either 13 or 15 lynchings. At one point he wa uh, they, he was involved. Uh, they try to get them to join the Klu Klux Klan. So he, he did it like undercover. They didn't know who he was. And, uh, He found out like at the meeting, what they planned on doing. And I guess he just got up right there in front of all them and said, you guys do anything like that here. I'm going to come back and beat the shit up. And then he left. Yeah. Yeah. You know, he, he, uh, interesting story, uh, that didn't really turn out the way, I guess he wanted, I don't is that he was, uh, assigned with a couple of the Rangers to protect a prisoner in a courthouse in Sherman, Texas. Uh, so black man who was being held, I think for rape or murder. Like, I can't remember right now, which I apologize. Right? Oh, the entire town showed up cause they wanted to hang him. Right. And he said, no, we're going to go through the court system. We're going to do everybody again. All these guys, same idea. There's right and wrong. There's the rule of law. That's how we keep it. Even for everybody and get it identified to the. Loud melts that were kind of pushing everybody out there. He just shot him, got a gunfight with him and shot two of them while they left for a while. And they came back and they burned the entire courthouse down. And unfortunately the guy inside, whether in love or know if he was guilty or not, because he was inside when, when it burned down and, and they barely escape out the back themselves. See, so it's not like everything. Is always hunky Dory and exactly the way you want it to be either you just try to do the best you can when you're out there right now. Um, but something else I found interesting, and it kind of reminds you about, well, it reminds you of how things are today compared to how things are were before. Some things don't change, but some things definitely changed. And that one was, they had this, the bankers association in Texas had this. Cam going. So what they would do is they would offer reward for bank robbers, right? And it was like $5,000. You bring us a bank. Robert we'll give you $5,000. What ended up happening was, well, Hey, I'm starting to get lightening strikes out there or are you. Yeah. All right. Keep going. You may disappear. Well, I'll be back. I'll be back anyway. Um, so anyway, he's what they were doing is they put up these rewards and the local, whoever again, right. That smaller few. Or just some local Cowboys, whatever, saying, okay. They get somebody who really didn't understand what was going on. Maybe not the sharpest pencil in the pack. And, um, they start planning a bank robbery with them and then they just grab him and say, well, this guy was going to be a bank robber and they would split the money with the banker. So just a big scam. Well, hammer found out about it. And he actually started making, he just made up flyers and went, I'll tell the banks and the courthouses where this was going on and start passing out flyers to congressmen and people walking around and say, this is wrong. You know, this is, we can't do on his own. Nobody else there. Um, they finally got it shut down, but, but for quite a while, even with him doing that, it was, they continued doing it because there was a way to make money by killing people who were. Perhaps they were in trapped. Yeah. Yeah. So I just find, if you really look at the history of like the Texas Rangers is probably the earliest known form of law enforcement in our country. And when they started, I mean, it basically was you got like, I don't know, 15 bucks a month. It was, you had to supply your own gun and your own rifle and your own horse go out and get the bad guys or you're fighting. You know, they were involved with the Mexican American war or that's basically where they came in. And they, you know, they So they've been around a long time, always. Well-respected just like, you know, lately it's like, let's pick on let's pick on every, did you have, I want to say something that's so bad and I can't. It has to do with, they were, they must've, they were started to haunt you. They started at a hundred. Who did I say? So I'm gonna leave that alone. I said, nothing's perfect. That's true. That's true. And things change over time. That's everybody takes everything out of context. You can't, you can't say somebody, you or me. 300 years ago, 200 years ago. Um, our thoughts on the world would be totally different than what they are now. We've evolved. Yeah. I mean, so anyway, uh, fine. You just had to go see. Yes, I did. Hey buddy. I got a storm rolling in here, so let's get you out of here before, uh, before we disappear for good. Um, yeah. We will, uh, we will talk to you all very soon, be safe, you know, don't try to be nice to each other. I mean, it's, it really is pretty not way you're supposed to be. I think so. I think so. I don't know why you wouldn't want to just, just think twice before you, you know, I don't want Whoa. Right. How about just think, just think about. Tomorrow. Cause it's gonna come. It's gonna come anyway. Alright, man. Be safe. Don't don't I'm waiting for the lights to go out. Well, don't be, don't be hanging around the pipes or anything. So, you know, it's like, if it's the house not grounded, do you need, you're near a water pipe. Didn't remember that, that don't take your shower in the, in the lightening storm. Don't you remember those old. No, I didn't have a shower back then. What the hell are you talking about? Oh my gosh. I forgot how old you are. Oh, there you go. I got to run out to the stream. Real man. Ran out to the street. Much those little fishies. That's right. Catch a couple yet. Have dinner. Don't tell don't what you caught them with. All right, man. Have a good one. I'll talk to you later. I'll talk to you later. Michigan plate. We'll be back soon. We will never change our tune. We thank you for your loyal support. So please subscribe and share our port sound off. Wound to sound off three, four sound off wound two, three, four. Let's roll.