The Titanium Vault hosted by RJ Bates III

Real Estate Tycoon Faces Death Penalty | Pardon The Disruption

March 11, 2024 RJ Bates III, Steve Trang, Stratton Brown, Chris Jefferson Episode 298
Real Estate Tycoon Faces Death Penalty | Pardon The Disruption
The Titanium Vault hosted by RJ Bates III
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The Titanium Vault hosted by RJ Bates III
Real Estate Tycoon Faces Death Penalty | Pardon The Disruption
Mar 11, 2024 Episode 298
RJ Bates III, Steve Trang, Stratton Brown, Chris Jefferson

Send me a text about what you love and want to see on future episodes!

Join the fray as we ignite conversations that are as heated as they are enlightening, all within this week's power-packed episode. Prepare to be swayed, amused, and informed as Steve Trang, Stratton Brown, RJ Bates III, and Chris Jefferson, join forces with me to dissect a spectrum of burning issues. From the repercussions of the Vietnamese real estate scandal and the necessity for stringent consequences in white-collar crime, to the less discussed but equally pervasive height bias in corporate leadership, we're here to challenge your perceptions and arm you with a fresh arsenal of insights.

Laughter meets learning as we navigate the towering expectations of height in the workplace, before diving deep into the complex digital currents of social media. With the finesse of seasoned commentators, we unravel the profound implications these platforms have on mental health and the developing minds of children. Our candid discussion doesn't shy away from controversial takes on government intervention in financial matters, like credit card fee regulations proposed by the Biden Administration, with a common thread of advocating for the empowerment through financial literacy.

Despite the playful jibes and jests, the seriousness of our discourse remains undiluted, bringing to light the hard-hitting realities of leadership dynamics mirrored in professional sports moves, such as Russell Wilson's departure. We lace our arguments with wit, but the punching weight of opinion and analysis in this championship of ideas is as undisputed as it is engaging. Tag along for a rollercoaster ride of thought-provoking debates and emerge from this auditory arena with your thoughts stirred and perhaps, your stance on certain topics, a little shaken.

With over 1,300 Videos, this is the #1 channel on YouTube for all things Virtual Wholesaling. SUBSCRIBE NOW!   https://www.youtube.com/@RJBatesIII

_________________________________

FREE RESOURCES FOR YOU:

Get my comprehensive list of Systems we use at Titanium Investments for FREE: https://www.kingclosersformula.com/fleet

If you want to learn how to close deals just like me, The King Closer, then download the free King Closer Formula PDF: https://www.kingclosersformula.com/close

Join our exclusive FB group community for real estate investors and wholesalers ($0 to join) : https://www.facebook.com/groups/titaniumvault/

_________________________________

Learn more about the systems I use to virtually wholesale nationwide using the links below!

Propstream Free 7 Day Trial (Nationwide Data & Comping Tool): http://trial.propstreampro.com/titanium/

Get 66% off LeadZolo Motivated Seller Leads using our exclusive link: https://www.leadzolo.com/titanium

Speed to Lead PPC Marketplace:  https://app.ispeedtolead.com/TITANIUM

Get 1000 FREE Buyer/ Seller Leads with a Batch Leads Trial: https://batchleads.io/titanium

Close 30% More Deals Using our preferred TC ezREIclosings: https://www.titaniumtc.com 

Support the Show.

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Send me a text about what you love and want to see on future episodes!

Join the fray as we ignite conversations that are as heated as they are enlightening, all within this week's power-packed episode. Prepare to be swayed, amused, and informed as Steve Trang, Stratton Brown, RJ Bates III, and Chris Jefferson, join forces with me to dissect a spectrum of burning issues. From the repercussions of the Vietnamese real estate scandal and the necessity for stringent consequences in white-collar crime, to the less discussed but equally pervasive height bias in corporate leadership, we're here to challenge your perceptions and arm you with a fresh arsenal of insights.

Laughter meets learning as we navigate the towering expectations of height in the workplace, before diving deep into the complex digital currents of social media. With the finesse of seasoned commentators, we unravel the profound implications these platforms have on mental health and the developing minds of children. Our candid discussion doesn't shy away from controversial takes on government intervention in financial matters, like credit card fee regulations proposed by the Biden Administration, with a common thread of advocating for the empowerment through financial literacy.

Despite the playful jibes and jests, the seriousness of our discourse remains undiluted, bringing to light the hard-hitting realities of leadership dynamics mirrored in professional sports moves, such as Russell Wilson's departure. We lace our arguments with wit, but the punching weight of opinion and analysis in this championship of ideas is as undisputed as it is engaging. Tag along for a rollercoaster ride of thought-provoking debates and emerge from this auditory arena with your thoughts stirred and perhaps, your stance on certain topics, a little shaken.

With over 1,300 Videos, this is the #1 channel on YouTube for all things Virtual Wholesaling. SUBSCRIBE NOW!   https://www.youtube.com/@RJBatesIII

_________________________________

FREE RESOURCES FOR YOU:

Get my comprehensive list of Systems we use at Titanium Investments for FREE: https://www.kingclosersformula.com/fleet

If you want to learn how to close deals just like me, The King Closer, then download the free King Closer Formula PDF: https://www.kingclosersformula.com/close

Join our exclusive FB group community for real estate investors and wholesalers ($0 to join) : https://www.facebook.com/groups/titaniumvault/

_________________________________

Learn more about the systems I use to virtually wholesale nationwide using the links below!

Propstream Free 7 Day Trial (Nationwide Data & Comping Tool): http://trial.propstreampro.com/titanium/

Get 66% off LeadZolo Motivated Seller Leads using our exclusive link: https://www.leadzolo.com/titanium

Speed to Lead PPC Marketplace:  https://app.ispeedtolead.com/TITANIUM

Get 1000 FREE Buyer/ Seller Leads with a Batch Leads Trial: https://batchleads.io/titanium

Close 30% More Deals Using our preferred TC ezREIclosings: https://www.titaniumtc.com 

Support the Show.

Speaker 1:

Welcome everyone to this week's part in the disruption. Nice to be back in the captain's seat. Shout out to Aaron for holding down the fort last week for me. I really appreciate that I am your host. Matthew Potter, I wanted to go ahead and give you a breakdown of how we do things around here. We're gonna go ahead and show you our rules right here. Boom, there we go. We got five questions, one minute for each one of our esteemed panelists to go ahead and argue their point, two minutes to chop it up. After that, points are awarded during the process. The one with the most points at the end of the game or at the end of the show will ultimately win the game. We're gonna go ahead and start off with our intros, starting with last week's champion. This is clearly because Aaron was judging. We have Mr Disruptor himself, steve Tran, go ahead and introduce yourself to the people.

Speaker 2:

What's going on? Everybody, I'm looking forward to today's show. We got CJ back after a two week hiatus. I don't know what he was doing, but he was obviously too busy for the rest of us. We got the Eagles look back there I don't know exactly what RJ is doing and we got Stratton back right. I said in the last episode we need more applicants for the show and nobody applies. So we still have Stratton and guys we were hiring. You know, for some reason I'm being attacked on TikTok as well. We mentioned that we're looking to hire some salespeople, but don't apply. Give blue hair, and it triggered some people. So, but you guys wanna work with us for a sales role? Disruptorsjobscom.

Speaker 1:

Man coming out of the gate in the intro. Steve is already gonna go ahead and get some shade thrown his way. All right, next up, we have not Mr California, mr Utah, sorry, you know from my last episode we have Stratton Daddy, introduce yourself to the people.

Speaker 3:

Hey guys, my name is Stratton Brown. I own a company called Virtual Help and we buy real estate. I'm so happy to be back. I think I got some gas for you guys today. You guys are gonna like one of my answers. You guys are gonna love it, but thank you guys so much for having me.

Speaker 1:

All right. So to the media team, we're gonna need the sensor button, you know, ready to go. Just boop, just, we're gonna mute them. All right, coming to us apparently doing his Kelsey impersonation. Over there, you know, in Dallas, Fort Worth, right now, we have RJ Bates looking very Viking-esque. Go ahead and introduce yourself to the people.

Speaker 5:

What's up everybody. Rj Bates. Third here, the green is because it's March and it's St Patrick's Day month, right, that's why I got this. Come on. No, I'm excited to be back. Unfortunately, we missed last week due to some internet outage going on at our office and, man, I apologize again for y'all having to deal with Dean Rogers for a full hour. I know it's brutal. Nothing really intelligent coming from that side. And also excited that Aaron's not the judge today. That was awful. So the only thing worse than Aaron judging is Potter, though, so we're stuck with that. But, yeah, excited to be here.

Speaker 1:

Looks like we're gonna be in the negative. Okay, so that's how that's gonna go. All right, you know I was gonna say something about your internet caught something from CJ's internet. It's like a whole thing. But you know we're not gonna go down that road, all right. Last, certainly not least, we have Mr Richmond VA himself. Chris CJ Jefferson, go ahead and introduce yourself to the people.

Speaker 6:

Yeah, what's up people, it's good to be back. Good to see everybody. Rj, you look terrible in green man. I don't know if anybody told me that, I don't know, just gonna go with the skin tone man, but good to see everybody strattin' what's up and yeah, let's have a good episode man.

Speaker 1:

There you go. It's gonna be a great episode today. All right, we're gonna get into it with question number one. Trong Mylan, a real estate tycoon, is facing the death penalty for over $12.5 billion worth of corruption in Vietnam. What do you think of how Vietnam is handling this real estate scandal? Start us off, Steve.

Speaker 2:

If there's one way I could describe it, it's perfect. I think this is exactly how it should be done. The biggest problem in America not the biggest problem, but one of the biggest problems is that there is no consequence for white collar crimes. Right, what is it? You can steal more, legally or not. You can steal more with a pen than you can with a gun. Right, it is so easy to take advantage of middle America, take advantage of old people, take advantage of just about anybody and everybody, all those guys with Enron and all these other frauds like freaking. Remember when Countrywide had friends with can't remember the guy, but the president or the CEO of Bank of America. Countrywide was friends with everyone at the US Senate. Right, it was ridiculous. If we took white collar crimes seriously, guess what Wall Street would stop stealing from people. So I think it's great. I love it. I wish we had something like that here.

Speaker 1:

Angelo Mosello is the chairman.

Speaker 2:

Friends of Angelo.

Speaker 1:

There you go, there you go, just throwing it back to 06. Right there for you. All right, stratton, what are your thoughts on this?

Speaker 3:

I mean I think you should be hung publicly or whoever it is. I think it's a woman. The big thing is, like Steve said, there's no consequences and there's no examples of what happens when you do these things and this will play into the other questions we have later on. But if someone goes out and does this, sam Bakeman freed, like they're thinking about not punishing him. You know, like they're kind of like pulling some stuff off and whatnot. If you hang that man in public and you're like, hey, if you steal billions of dollars, this is what happens to you, that sets a very good example. I don't think the death penalty is quite enough, but 100% I'm with Steve there needs to be actual consequences for corruption. I mean, we could even take this down like the Pelosi tracker she's the best stock trader of all time and there is no consequences for said corruption.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, for anybody that needs stock trading tips, Pelosi is the way to go. 100%. Just copy and paste. You're a millionaire by March. Like you're good. All right, RJ, what about you?

Speaker 5:

Wow, I'm pretty shocked that we had two people just right out of the gates coming with the. Yeah, we should hang her in the streets. The death penalty is a little bit extreme here, and my thought process behind that is what are we learning from this person who is able to get away with $12 and 1 half billion in corruption? Obviously, the Vietnam government is doing something about it. This is a government. The government is stepping in and saying, hey, we know the corruption has existed.

Speaker 5:

This is not the only case that exists. They actually think that there's probably, I think I believe I read six more cases that she could potentially be involved in. My thought was is could we do something along the lines of light with Hannibal Lecter, where we use her and we actually interview her and learn, like, how are you able to get away with this? Because there's fears that there's a lot more people in Vietnam that were able to get away with this level of fraud. So just getting rid of her and killing her, I mean, yeah, it strikes fear in people, but I don't know that it's really the solution we need to get down to. How is this even able to be accomplished?

Speaker 1:

in my opinion, Point to RJ for working Hannibal Lecter into PTD Without Leon even being here, our resident serial killer specialist. So that was amazing. All right, cj, what are your thoughts on this man?

Speaker 6:

You know, I just saw this question five minutes before we started with that. I've never heard of Trung my Land in my life. All right, but here's what I could conclude while you guys were speaking and breezing through this article about it. I mean, why is everybody so pissed off with her? I mean, was she in the wrong? Yeah, but what I'm reading is this seems like a government issue and this seems like an institution issue. Right, and we see this happening all the time, right?

Speaker 6:

How many people I see these reels on TikTok and IG and all this different stuff. People just make up the amount of their income when they're getting credit, cars and auto loans. They just say that they've got jobs that they don't actually have, so they can get debt. Just because it's $12.5 billion, I don't know that. I really see it any differently. I think there's a regulatory issue number one and I think there's a personnel issue, because people are getting bribed. If you've got masses of people getting bribed for a fraud of $12.5 billion, I think the bigger problem the problem is much bigger than Trung my Land.

Speaker 2:

So I completely agree with you, cj. The problem is bigger and I think all of them should be hauled off. As far as RJ trying to figure out how did this happen? It's pretty easy you freaking bribe government officials. It's like corruption is not a challenging concept. It's like you don't need a course. You don't need to buy a $3,000 course off of Instagram from some guy in front of the Lambo right. You can figure that pretty damn easily. And then the last thing is, I would say, is I am shocked that Strand would imply that Pelosi is not naturally a better stock trader than Warren Buffett. Jesus.

Speaker 6:

Yeah, I mean.

Speaker 3:

Inherently a better trader bro.

Speaker 6:

Politicians have been bribed since the beginning of government. That will always be the case. At some point it becomes government responsibility of their officials. Who's auditing this? Who's paying attention to what's happening?

Speaker 5:

You want to know one of the most impressive stats that I saw about this. In the article that I read, they said that the documents for this case weigh over six tons. That's how many documents are in this case. How did that? Who weighed that shit? That's where I was. They were like, hey, weigh all those pieces of paper and see how much that weighs.

Speaker 2:

It's because they had to get the trucks involved. They're like how many trucks do we need to take this from point A to point B to get us all the way to the courthouse steps? How?

Speaker 5:

much do we need? When you're through like three tons, you stop reading at that point and it's like, OK, I think we know what happened.

Speaker 3:

Well, we were good. Who's reading it? Who's sitting down? What government lackey got put on that Like hey, bro Well hopefully we got AI putting it together in AI processing it.

Speaker 2:

We got CJ's software on it. Offerbolt is going through the documents, figure out all the distress assets. So Chris is making offers and all those distress assets in Vietnam.

Speaker 6:

Fair enough, man, fair enough. I don't know if I want to own any property there, though it seems like man.

Speaker 2:

Despite all this corruption, I mean, vietnam has a lot of good things going for it, right? So there are a lot of other countries investing in Vietnam. Like the wisdom of investing in the country where the government can seize your assets at any time right, there's risk there, but all in all, a lot of multinational companies are investing there because labor is cheap. Instead of going to India right you can go to Vietnam and get same-collar board of people for less money. Stratton's looking over there for his VA help.

Speaker 5:

So Steve, I don't know if you know this or not Maybe you don't read the comments on our shorts but you're already referred to as the Communist Panelist. So you're saying Vietnam has a lot going for it with its communism.

Speaker 2:

I am the panel's expert on communism.

Speaker 1:

Oh man, all right. Well, that concludes question one. We have four more, and this is going to be amazing. If that is question one, All right, we're going to get into question number two. In the US, 14.5% of men are six feet or taller, but among CEOs of Fortune 500 companies, 58% are six foot or taller and among Fortune 500 CEOs, 30% are six-two or taller. Based on this, do you feel there is a subconscious bias toward taller men? Go ahead and start us off. Go ahead and start us off Stratton.

Speaker 3:

Let me preface this with a quote that I hear hold near and dear to my heart, that I've heard for a very long time Beta males get no bitches. 100% through and through. That is science. It's been that way forever. Now.

Speaker 3:

If we take this and we extrapolate it over time, over time, since the beginning of time, humans choose the biggest, the strongest, the fastest and the smartest leader to lead them. It has been that way everywhere. It is so primal and Fortune 500 CEOs have to be like movie stars with the amount of charisma they need to have. They need to talk to shareholders and do all this stuff. Stature plays a huge role into that. You can't pretend like it's not insanely primal for these people to be that tall. I've experienced it myself. I am 6'2". Look at me, I'm gorgeous, I can get a lot of things going. It just goes that way. And then I've seen it time and time again in locker rooms, even if you look at a quarterback Peyton Manning is 6'5", tom Brady is 6'5" these dudes are huge. Stature plays a massive role when it comes into leading these people, on top of charisma and everything else, and I'm pretty sure you could apply good looks into that and you'd see the same thing.

Speaker 1:

I mean, it's a great argument Not going to sit there and pick that one apart, all right. What about you, rj? What are your thoughts?

Speaker 5:

So real quick fact check Stratton is 6'2" On the Fresno State website. In real life he's 5'11" and that's why he got cut by the Seattle State. Why about that? Get that out real quick. Yeah, I mean, just look at this panel, for example. Okay, Steve's the shortest and no one respects him at all. The reason why me and CJ win every other episode is because we're the tallest In that, right, CJ 100%, just talking about our good looks and our height.

Speaker 5:

This is interesting, though. I mean I was looking at this. It is pretty crazy to think the 30% are 6'2 or taller of Fortune 500 CEOs. That's a pretty crazy number. When it was broken down, I think only 3% of men in the world are 6'2 or taller. That is pretty crazy. So obviously, yeah, there's a bias towards it. I don't quite understand it. I never really thought about it until I saw this question, but yeah, I do think there's a bias.

Speaker 1:

There you go. Okay, cj, as another tall lad, what are your thoughts on this one?

Speaker 6:

Yeah, first man. Happy birthday, Steve. Shout out to all the women watching. By the way, Much love to you all. Yeah, look what was the stat potter. Is it under 6'2?

Speaker 1:

Under 6'2, yes.

Speaker 6:

Yes, a tough life. I think it's tough man. Sometimes I see people and I mean this respectfully sometimes I see people sub 6'2. I say I'm like dang, I wonder where that guy's got to go. I just did this the other day when I was getting a coffee with Starbucks, saw a guy came in the door about RJ's height. You know what I mean. And I'm like dang, bro, I wonder where that guy's going through today just because of his height. You know what I mean. He's got to go check in the hotel. He's got to get the ADA compliant room. Yeah, the way to do everything is appropriate. So I got to imagine, when it comes to being a CEO, if the CEO was 5'5, and he just I still don't see that.

Speaker 6:

You know, I still know that it goes well, man, I think that's tough enough.

Speaker 1:

Oh man, all right, can't argue with it, cj, can't argue with it. All right, steve. Thoughts Pass, no pass, absolutely not.

Speaker 2:

So, first of all, being the only person here apparently that is not 6'2, I feel like we need to pass some legislation for equity here. There's clearly a wage gap, a pay gap, between 6 plus and 6 and under. So I'm going to be writing a letter to my congresspeople and tell them that we need to have some legislation to even out the wages for those 6'2 and up and 6'2 and below. I think that's the only fair way to make this all work out, because it's unfair to people like me. We have nothing going for us. We're just discriminated against left and right, nothing. So to answer this question, to know to answer this question, of course there's a bias and it's everything that Stratton mentioned right.

Speaker 2:

We naturally assess our environment and we give attributes for men. It's been well documented for a very, very long time You're 6'1, taller, you're pretty much guaranteed to make six figures right. Guys have to be taller, women have to be better looking and if they are that way, they just do better financially. There's no way around that. That's the reason why we want to have good looking women in our advertisements. And the last thing I want to end us with is like what happened to Stratton right, like he's 6'2. With a helmet and cleats on right, he's good looking and he still ended up where he's at. How did this happen?

Speaker 5:

Oh man, we're definitely canceled after this episode. This is it.

Speaker 1:

This is it.

Speaker 6:

This is it right here. I think when you're under 6' and I'm not, so, I'm just, you know it's a hypothesis, but I think when people are under 6' I think they spend so much time worried about being under 6' You're out of your gut.

Speaker 6:

You know, shout out to Steve. I think they operate in a space where they're thinking about it so much that they can't focus on the task at hand of ascending to a path of being CEO and thinking about all these complex things. So look, if you're under 6' like Steve, I've seen people out here with the heeled shoes on right. You know, stem cell research is coming a long way, perhaps, all right, and they even got the thing now where you can, like stretch your limbs.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, they got that surgery for Steve over. He sent me a report the other day.

Speaker 2:

So we're doing a go fund me for Steve's femur stretching operation so I can get the 6' tall, so I can finally make 6 figures.

Speaker 6:

No, I think I see all these ages coming over to real. You know, nationwide, my guy, everybody coming over to real. So you guys being ahead of the curve and I think once y'all stock goes up you know those shares maybe you look with just a few. You know Elon's style right and get a femur stretch man.

Speaker 2:

You know.

Speaker 5:

I will say there was an event that I spoke at it West Palm Beach, florida, and when I was walking in, a guy saw me come up the escalator and he was like RG paints. And then as we walked up he goes dude, I thought you'd be so much taller, I thought you would for sure be like 6'5, and then just walked away. He was like such a disappointment to him. He was just like, yeah, I don't even care to like talk to you anymore.

Speaker 2:

And his name was Steve Tran. So I've also actually at multiple events. People walk up to me and they're like, wow, you're a lot taller than thought you'd be. I was like, is it because I'm Asian?

Speaker 3:

Like, why did you think I'd be a short person. They imagine a 5'4 dude just sitting there and his legs and the chair just Thank you for the illustration.

Speaker 2:

Like a freaking first grader.

Speaker 1:

Okay, so I think everybody won that round. Shout out to CJ Throne Reel in there. We appreciate you for the advertisement there. We're going to get into question number three, which is our viral video this week. Check it out.

Speaker 5:

I never really considered that until your book. I never considered that thinking about your problems all the time and talking about your problems all the time literally make the problems grow.

Speaker 4:

That's right, I mean, it's the number one symptom of depression is what they call rumination, this pathological obsessing over your pain.

Speaker 4:

That's why stuff like exercise that's one of the reasons, aside from chemical reasons one of the reasons that doing anything, you know that running errands is good for your mental health. Getting out of your house and accomplishing anything is good for you, but sitting around talking and thinking about your problems, that's a bad habit and the best cognitive behavioral therapist the first thing they do is try to break that bad pattern, but a lot of therapists just indulge it.

Speaker 1:

All right. What do you make of Abigail Stryer's remarks about anxiety and depression among Gen Z? Start us off, RJ.

Speaker 5:

Yeah, as far as the video itself goes, I mean, when you're talking about always constantly thinking about your problems. This is something that I taught to our community about our employees hey, things aren't going well. You get into a rut. You feel like you can't close a deal. You feel like every deal is going to have title issues. Everything's going to fall apart. I'm a firm believer in self-talk and building that momentum for yourself and believing like speaking in the existence. I do think this is a huge problem. I think it's a huge problem in the entrepreneur space. You're going to run into struggles. You're going to run into issues. If you're consistently speaking that into existence and believing that those are going to happen. That's where you just inevitably fail. I absolutely agree with what they're talking about there. It's something I'm always preaching to make sure you're talking to yourself and speaking in the existence what you really want.

Speaker 1:

There we go. Manifestation is definitely happening over there in RJ Bates Camp. We like it All right, CJ, what are your thoughts on this?

Speaker 6:

Yeah, I think social media era that we exist in now is just dangerous, right, Every time you open up the app, there's somebody that's got an opinion on something. There's somebody telling you that you're depressed. There's somebody telling you that you're poor. There's somebody telling you that you're All this stuff. I think that has a lot of impact on Gen Z. Man, they haven't had an opportunity to just almost think for themselves. You see kids that got phones at five, six, seven, eight years old. All these kids got Snapchat. They're looking at you go on Pinterest now and they got reels on Pinterest. Man, I think a lot of people's minds in Gen Z are just getting hit with so much stuff. That stuff they're getting hit with is outside opinion, not internal opinion. They can develop themselves.

Speaker 1:

There you go. Outside influences are creating their reality. All right, what about you, steve? What are your thoughts on this?

Speaker 2:

I had a really hard time listening. I was so focused on my being short. I'm still depressed. I was focused on that this whole time.

Speaker 1:

Just trying to get his feet on the floor.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, trying to touch the floor right here with my shoes on. She makes a totally valid point. I think that everyone's so focused on what's wrong and they just stay there. You got the serenity prayer. God, grant me serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change things that I can. They're wisdom to know the difference. I think that's powerful. I think you look at, worry is just negative energy about the future, regret is just negative energy about the past. These are things you can't change. The only things you can change are the here and now. I think those that can focus on the here and now, feel empowered to do something about it, those that are always worried, are going to be stuck in that negative place. Unfortunately, we are being taught I think we've become a much weaker society to just focus on all the things that are wrong and just keep dwelling in it and dwelling on that Instead of actually doing something. Instead of picking yourself up by your bootstraps and getting out there and changing something, let's just worry about the past. It's a lot easier.

Speaker 1:

Steve coming in like a self-help section over there. I like it All right. What about you, Stratton? What are your thoughts on this one?

Speaker 3:

All right, I'm going to take this a little bit deeper. When I was 16 years old, I had a massive mental breakdown and tried to take my own life. I've had 10 years to analyze all of those thought tracks. All right, like 10, 12 years to think about that, all the shame, anxiety, depression and where it all came from. It came from shame, because I felt like I wasn't living up to the way everything was if I had social media to make it way worse. Then I tore my hamstring and so I thought my life was over because I didn't have any possibility of making the NFL. When everybody told me from 12 years old on, hey, you're going to go to the NFL, you're going to do awesome, I was like my life is over.

Speaker 3:

Looking back at it, all of it was like that internal locus of control and I felt like I didn't have control of my life anymore and it all been taken away from me.

Speaker 3:

All right. So if we want to apply what Steve talked about and what RJ talked about, if I would have applied the positive self-talk and felt like I had control over my life, that would be something completely different to where I don't think a lot of kids these days have a lot of responsibility, to even see that they can control their lives, to go out there and go and do something, because they have no responsibilities. Most of them don't even have a driver's license anymore. So if they're controlling their internal thoughts and thinking positive and having all the right things and I think community is a huge part of it as well then the depression will slightly go away. But in all reality, I think it goes from having responsibility and having control of your life, or at least believing you can control the circumstances that you're in. Because when she talked about someone getting bullied in middle school blah, blah, blah that's over, that happens now. I know I have the tools to control the situation and get out of it, and then you can stop thinking about the past.

Speaker 2:

Did Sharan just say he's 26? I'm 28,. Sorry, son of a bitch.

Speaker 3:

All right.

Speaker 7:

They don't teach math at Fresno State. What was that, RJ?

Speaker 5:

I said they don't teach math at Fresno State.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, that makes sense All, at Fresno State.

Speaker 2:

Yeah. So, going back to what CJ said, though, just go a little bit deeper here, because to counteract or to counter-argue what Sharan's talking about, community, community isn't enough, because there are negative communities as well. Social media's job is to keep you glued to the app. If you're in Facebook groups that talk about how crappy life is, that's going to be the community you're in. If you're on TikTok and you're watching videos about all the weird feelings and thoughts you have, you can get more things about how this is normal. The community isn't necessarily the answer either.

Speaker 5:

I agree and, on that note, Steve CJ brought up the social media aspect of this. This is a huge concern that I have for my kids coming up and then the next generation. Quite frankly, my son gets made fun of. He's 11 years old and he's the only kid on his hockey team that doesn't have a cell phone.

Speaker 6:

That was my daughter, RJ. I know exactly what you're talking about.

Speaker 5:

I told him I'm like son, the moment you get a cell phone, you have it for the rest of your life. Like, enjoy the fact that you don't have one, because there's a lot more negative that comes with having it than not having it. Enjoy being a kid. And here's the thing when we talk about opening up social media, cj, like there are people out there not to pick on one, but this is a everyone knows what I'm going to talk about. Andy Elliott says you can't work for me if you don't have a six pack. How many people watch that? Looked up to Andy Elliott and say I'm not good enough to be there because I don't have a six pack. And he thinks that's making a positive movement for people. But there's a lot of people that say I'm not good enough now. I'm not good enough to be where. Andy Elliott says I could go create my own reality. How many people reacted to that negatively, like, for example, when you went out and said people shouldn't make organic content, bro. Like I was depressed for like a month.

Speaker 1:

Yo.

Speaker 6:

Well, listen, but that speaks to the influence of social media, right, yeah, and then, at the end of the day, you know, everybody's getting hit with something, especially Gen Z, right, like we, at least in our age and people who are older have the awareness of, like pre-social media, right, but like, if you're our kid's age, right, like, I mean, all you know is the world that we exist in right now, which is a social media influence to world, right, and you know, it's sad in a way, but what really ends up happening is RJ kind of just said it Negative thoughts. You have opinion, you know, whatever, you're going to be hit with the algorithm about it as soon as you get online and it's only going to just continue to drive that mindset. Right, if you're dealing with relationship issues, and boom, you're going to be hit with stuff about why you've got relationship issues and you need to fix this, you need to fix that and whether it's, you know, money, right, you're going to be hit with those different things and, like the Andy Elliott comment, what's unfortunate and dangerous? Right, we've got a political question on here. I know Stratton and RJ and Steve are super excited, and so what happens, right, is everybody's a politician now.

Speaker 6:

That's the hard truth. Everybody's a politician now. Everybody with a cell phone that's posting quote unquote content. Whether you're a normal person that has nothing for sale, or if you're somebody who does have something for sale, everybody's a politician now. So we got to stop shitting on politician, because we all do the same thing right. And so what happens is everybody's got their platform about what they're trying to get somebody to see, what they're trying to get somebody to understand. And so what happens? Unfortunately, rj is the common person. The working guy is working in a factory right now that is trying to get inspired and motivated in his life really, truly looks up to Andy Elliott. He thinks that everything that Andy Elliott is saying is meant to help him in an organic, genuine place to change his life. And in reality, man, I'm sure Andy's just trying to sell some shit.

Speaker 2:

So two things real quick. First, rj is pointing out that his 11 year old can't have a cell phone. Potter's echoed the same Yup. Cj understands that pain because he went through the same thing. I'm going through that fight right now. I got 11, 12 year old. Neither of them are allowed to have a cell phone, right? So I think there's something there, something to consider, right? That's the first thing. Second thing if you have a six pack, go work for Andy Elliott. If you don't have a six pack and you're performing cells, you're up DisruptorsJobscom.

Speaker 3:

There you go, I think, like, have you guys read Powerverse 4? So I think I got the book from Steve Yup. Like, wherever your energy goes and that focus goes, that thing is going to grow and I think that is one thing that is not taught in schools. I'm pretty woo woo.

Speaker 3:

I feel like we all are very big on self talk. So if you keep focusing on it and focusing on it and focusing on it, that thing is just going to blow up and it's going to essentially just devour your entire life. And I think with my kid my son listens to a bunch of self help books with me, right, and I know Steve's big on this too Like when I'm driving in the car, I'm like, hey, we're going to learn on the way to Taekwondo practice, whether we're going to learn about raising private money, listening to, like, tony Robbins, joe Dispenza, because I think that's we have to arm our kids with those tools early if we want them to be successful, because, like, social media is wild, even we get caught up in comparison. Nobody here can say that they don't.

Speaker 5:

Oh.

Speaker 3:

I see videos of Andy Elliott. All the time he's furious he doesn't have a six pack.

Speaker 5:

Well, let me, let me take it a little bit further than that. It's not just the social media, it's also the like going to the cell phone aspect for our kids. It's the group text message threads with all the other kids and negative.

Speaker 5:

Whatever, whatever influence they've got right, whatever they've been exposed to, yes, the bullying that goes on there, the name calling, the body shaming these are the things that caused that depression amongst our younger generation, where they don't even understand what they're doing to each other mentally. That's the scary part about what even just cell phones can do for our kids.

Speaker 2:

Well, I mean, we were pretty bad as kids. I mean, look at this show, right Like. I already talked about anti-bullying and he's being mean to me, right? So that's first and second. Like the danger of social media is, you might think it's appropriate to have an all green screen, right Like, look at this right now.

Speaker 5:

I've never made fun of you, Steve. I've only spoken the truth about you.

Speaker 1:

Oh man, this is great. I can't even be mad at this. I do love this conversation. I'll share this one with you guys. My now 19 year old daughter for the longest time didn't have a cell phone until I believe she was almost 13 was when she finally got one, to this day now she thanks us for not giving her a cell phone at 10, 11, 9, you know, whatever the age was. So there's your perspective. She's like dude. I'm really glad I still had a childhood rather than just being glued to that and being involved in some drama.

Speaker 3:

So your kids have tablets.

Speaker 1:

My little kids.

Speaker 3:

My son didn't play on like for an hour a week.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, they have. They have designated screen time, but it's only, I think, only Saturday and Sunday is the only time we allow it, and it's pre approved like things that actually help them learn.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah, what about you guys? I'm just interested in hearing your hand.

Speaker 2:

They're only allowed to watch real estate disruptors, these poor children.

Speaker 6:

I'm probably similar to Potter for my daughter. I didn't even I mean, she didn't even have a TV for I mean years, man, probably I don't know maybe fifth grade, I don't know. For me it was just always. I remember one time when she was super young, you know, like I was doing the dad thing right and trying to do some other stuff, dropped her in a pack and play in front of the TV so I could try to get something done. She's, like you know, two years old or something like that, and no-transcript. I saw the mental attachment when the TV went off and I was just like, yeah, no, that's not gonna work Right, but she's got 3.7 GPA, she scheduled to graduate two years early, right, and a lot of that is because she cares about things other than just being entertained all the time.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, my kids, they're entertained all the time.

Speaker 5:

My kids have very limited screen time. You know they each have tablets, but that's mainly for when we're traveling and on planes and stuff like that. They don't have any TVs in the room. And then, as far as social media goes, the only thing that I allow is my son can watch the NHL TikTok because he's obsessed with hockey, and he can watch it for about 10 minutes every night and then it's like hey, bro, turn it off. Outside of that it's, it's go be a kid, enjoy being a kid. You only get it once.

Speaker 1:

Dude, I'll be honest with you. The other day I came home I think it was actually from hosting this. I came home, walked in the door and Nicole was like hey, the kids have been outside playing for the last six hours and I was like good way to be kids, like that's what it's about. Like go outside, get dirty, learn about stuff. That's what it should be about. Love that question, love the direction that it went in. This is awesome. All right, before we get into question number four, word from Mr Pat Hilton, our sponsor over at Acoustic Force Media.

Speaker 7:

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Speaker 1:

There we go. Thank you, pat, for all you do for us over here. On part of the disruption. We've got a good game going here. It's a close game. I want to see some A plus answers on these last two. All right, russell Wilson was recently released from the Denver Broncos. What do you think of their decision to part ways and take on 85 million in dead money? Start us off, cj.

Speaker 6:

I like it. I mean, look, they're not playing a game to win this year, right? I mean, why would you not get rid of the guy? He's a shell of his former self, doesn't seem as focused on football. They overpaid him to begin with. Sometimes in business, we make bad plays right, make bad decisions. I have learned from experience the faster you can take an L and get down the road, the better, and so I think they've made a great decision because he's not their future quarterback and that's what they need to be planning for.

Speaker 1:

I love that comment, bro, Like the sooner you can cut ties on a bad investment, the better, Like that's just what you got to do. All right, Steve, what are your thoughts on this one?

Speaker 2:

This is similar to a lot of things we've talked about in the past on this show, right? The asking yourself no one would want to know today, would I hire this person again? And the answer is no. They sign the part ways, right? If they left, would it be unhappy? No, Get rid of them. It's the same thing here. Another rule, right I think Stratton brought this up on a different episode If your name comes up in three different leadership meetings, it's time to go, and I think that's what happened here.

Speaker 2:

I think it's the right move. I mean, in reality, Russell Wilson has always sucked I say that respectfully as a Cardinals fan, right. So he's always been trash and I am a bit of a hater here. I'm glad to see him fall apart. I'm glad to see the Broncos fall apart. So I think this was the right move for both parties. But also as a business move, if we had our team. This is no different than like hey, I got a property. I put $8,500 nonrefundable earnest right, but now that I've got this property on the contract and I find out all these things, should I buy it anyway because I don't want to lose 8,500? Or I just lose 8,500 because I don't want to lose any more money.

Speaker 1:

There we go. Steve is absolutely undefeated in his hate of NFC West teams other than the Cardinals. Clearly All right, stratton your thoughts.

Speaker 3:

I think Russ was too short to be a quarterback. Maybe we're respected in because they're going to play for us.

Speaker 3:

But in all reality I think he was toxic bro. I think he was a toxic choir boy who couldn't lead a group of men. And everybody saw you saw with the Seahawks stuff and then everybody started to hate him a little bit at the end of it. And then, if you bring him in, I think from Denver's perspective just like everybody said, you took a bet that you thought didn't have a whole ton of downside You're like hey, you know what, we're going to go for it, we're going to try and get this W. What's our worst possible outcome? It is this we're OK with going and taking the bet, paying them a ton of money it didn't work out. And, like Chris said, take the L and just bounce right back up and keep going, because that's how you're going to keep it pushing, and then they'll probably build forward and again another three years, I mean. But Russ sucks.

Speaker 7:

I can't stand Russ.

Speaker 3:

I can't stand him bro. I think he's terrible. I don't think he can lead the choir boy aspect and like the fakeness when you're in like an NFL locker room. You have to be such a good leader, to like talk to so many different demographics and people, and if you're trying to be fake about the whole thing, you're going to lose everybody.

Speaker 6:

Yeah, I think Russ Wilson came into the league.

Speaker 5:

I don't know if you know how this works or not.

Speaker 2:

CJ did take a couple of weeks off, bro.

Speaker 6:

You got to let RJ yeah, it's the fruit and that's strut was just spot on my bad. I think what just happened is like RJ's got the green on, with this backlight going on in green. I think he just blended in. I didn't even know he was there.

Speaker 1:

Bro. All right, we're going to give RJ a chance. We're going to give RJ a chance. All right, RJ, what are your thoughts?

Speaker 5:

So, first of all, most they should have never gotten Russell Wilson. But to follow that up today they just released Justin Simmons, who is their all pro safety longest tenured player, the face of the locker room. I think that's a mistake and obviously they're just trying to revamp everything. So my thought is, instead of taking the dead cap hit, why wouldn't you just keep Russell Wilson for another year and let him guarantee you getting a top five draft pick for next year? I mean, that's one thought that you could have taken on this, because they're the 12th pick here. They're not going to get a QB, so what are they replacing them with?

Speaker 5:

It is a little bit of an odd move. It's obviously a historical move as far as dead cap hit, and also I just don't know if Sean Payton should be back coaching it. I didn't like how Sean Payton handled last year. I thought the move at the end of the year was weird, because he actually got it to where Russell Wilson was playing better. At one point. They were competitive in games that, quite frankly, talent-wise, they shouldn't have been competitive in, and then he benched him, and so all of this is weird. Right now, I think the Broncos is like the ultimate dumpster fire of an organization they develop and it's just odd how they're handling everything.

Speaker 2:

I love it. So for those of you guys that aren't aware, behind the scenes CJ has a policy that we're not allowed to give RJ CJ's cell phone number. He's just adamant against it. And what's crazy is that's exactly what Russell Wilson did to Marshawn Lynch. Yeah Right, russell Wilson wouldn't give his cell phone to Marshawn Lynch. That guy carried your team.

Speaker 5:

That video where Marshawn Lynch is talking about it is the most awkward video of all time, where you're like is he just so high? He's making this up right now, or is this really what happened?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so you talk about toxic leadership, like I'm with Stratton, you got to lead everybody Six foot and up, six foot under. We have to lead everybody equally, evenly, equitably. All that good stuff. But also to be a good leader, maybe you should give other people your cell phones, cj Mm.

Speaker 6:

I'll take that under review.

Speaker 1:

Take it under review. I think if you sign up for the bolt, you do Like. If you get access, I think you get CJ's cell number.

Speaker 6:

I'm changing my number this year though. So you know, and I'm going to just do it in a fashion where I'm just not going to give any notice. You know, it's just like if you got, if you're like, if I hit you on the new line, like you got it, and I'm going to leave the old number on for a little bit so people think they're reaching out and they don't feel like I just switched the number on them right away. But so RJ, just you know, heads up.

Speaker 5:

Shut up CJ. Back on Russell Wilson. Has there ever been a quarterback in the NFL that has just fallen as hard as Russell Wilson has after one play, like he's one yard away from winning another Super Bowl, throws that interception and it's like his career has just completely plummeted since then and it's come out that like no one likes him has ever liked him. I mean, it's just, it's honestly astonishing because he was at the top. How tall is he?

Speaker 3:

He's like 5'9", like it's amazing that he's even alive If I can get a statue of him.

Speaker 2:

Statue of a man.

Speaker 3:

Hard to survive at 5'9". But if we take this and we apply it to just business, you have to fire the toxic employee immediately and you have to get them out of the locker room because they're going to destroy everything, like cancer is real and they're just going to go and pull everybody down. And if you have a toxic leader leading everyone, bro, it's all going to fall apart. You saw with the Broncos, you saw with the Seahawks. At the end of it, you cannot have that toxic person.

Speaker 2:

What was Pete Carroll doing? I mean, like chewing gum, chewing gum.

Speaker 5:

Well, I want to know, and on that note, how did the Broncos not know that Russell Wilson was this toxic when they basically gave away that entire organization to get Russell Wilson? I mean literally, they had no intel on the fact that this dude is just a douchebag.

Speaker 6:

Maybe, maybe you just want to sabotage, maybe just I don't, I don't know that it sees a douchebag, right, I think, is to stratens point hey, what he's? He's got no swag, right, he's got. He's got no strong energy. He's got what'd you say? Five, nine he's got. Perhaps he's got shout the steep, maybe he's got five, nine energy and, and I think he's just, you know, coming in the locker room Throwing off the another panelist for next week.

Speaker 2:

I'm out of here, you know he's, you know, they got.

Speaker 6:

Maybe they got future playing.

Speaker 3:

You know I can't remember, even though, like you, can't play future in the locker room with Russell Wilson.

Speaker 6:

I who doesn't want to listen to you in the locker room.

Speaker 3:

That's crazy.

Speaker 6:

Yeah, yeah. So I mean I think he's coming in there. You know he's throwing on Kirk Franklin or whatever. You know Shout-outs. A Christian, you know music and all that. I'm a Christian, right.

Speaker 5:

But sometimes I'm listening a future too on the Martian Lynch interview, where he's talking about the fact that Russell Wilson would give his phone number. What did he tell him to do? Do?

Speaker 2:

talk to that the caddy, or like the does. Does someone on the team right the?

Speaker 5:

oh yeah, handler or something. Yeah, yeah, dude. I mean, yeah, that that's not good energy CJ, and there's more stories about him doing that inside of the Seahawks organization. Yeah.

Speaker 6:

I'm trying to figure out, as he's trying to talk to me direct.

Speaker 2:

Get your handler to talk to RJ.

Speaker 6:

Yeah, South RJ basement oh.

Speaker 1:

All right, all right, we're gonna get into question number five. Four was clearly amazing. This one's gonna be great. Cj had alluded to it. We have our political question of the week here. Apparently it's trending. It is. The Biden administration is proposing a credit card late fee cap of eight dollars as a campaign against Junk fees. Do you feel this measure will help consumers with credit card debt or hurt them, as credit access Might be more difficult to acquire? Start us off, steve.

Speaker 2:

Well, I'm glad we finally fixed the credit card problems. Right, like this, is it this? Is it like all the credit card debt situation is now fixed? Right, we're not gonna have the $14 $34 junk fees, right? I understand what they're trying to do like. The intent is great, right, the intent is good. Let's reduce all the fees that the consumers incur, I get it right. But what else have we done with good intent? We went to Iraq, right? Stop a madman. That's one of the worst decisions, allegedly. This is my time, all right, so anyway, there are a lot of things that we try to do with good intent and the outcome is generally worse.

Speaker 2:

Every time we do something, there's going to be a consequence, unintended consequence. I tend to believe that everyone in the government they, they make decisions Looking at the first order and it's great, the first order consequence is always great. We never look at the second and third order consequences. I'll give you a perfect example here in Arizona, we've banned payday loans here. Understandable, right. Why should people be making 22, 24? 80% APR on these loans? I get the intent.

Speaker 2:

So you got rid of them. Now what do we have? Predatory Title loans where you can't make your payments. You lose your car, right? So before it was like don't do any payday loans because we don't want these people pay our interest rates, despite the fact that they can't go to a bank to check their, to cash your check, because they have terrible banking history. So now, instead of going to a payday loan to cash your check, now you have to put up your car and if you don't make your payments you lose your car, and now you can't even get a freaking job. So I think that the we never look at the second, third order, third order consequences, and that's what's shameful about all of this.

Speaker 1:

I Can't believe this. I took a week off and Steve somehow All of a sudden had great answers for this week. I don't understand what's going on here. All right, stratton, your thoughts on this one.

Speaker 3:

Nine times out of ten. I believe regulation is not the answer, because I get generally Free market should take care of itself, and we can see it in all these different spaces to where all the margins get competed away down to zero. Eventually, if you don't let them consolidate, another company will come in and keep lowering the fees and lowering the fees and lowering the fees until the fees are very nominal. But if you let them consolidate and retain power, then those fees will never go away. Right, and so we talked about a couple weeks ago. We have what is a capital on and discover emerging, and that was one thing. I was like no, you shouldn't let them do that. That's way too much consolidation, it's monopoly, and then that's what will cause things like that. But in the open market, more times than not, prices will get shrunk down and everything will be fine.

Speaker 3:

We can apply this to the real estate space. You saw it with skip tracing. It started off at 25 cents a skip. It is now officially six to two cents. Right, you can take it to cold calling. Wages used to be super high. Now you can get it down to like six dollars an hour. We can take it down to like prop stream. You can name all these things in the open market to where there's margin there and then eventually, as the market sorts itself out, all those margins get shrunk down to zero or to very razor thin and then that's what helps and benefits the consumer. And so if you are gonna do this, it's not gonna help anything and that are gonna make up margin in some other type of way.

Speaker 1:

There you go. All right, I like it All right. Rj, what are your thoughts on this? I?

Speaker 5:

Mean, who are we pandering to right now? I mean, we're we're going to the consumer and we're saying, hey, you didn't pay your bill on time and and that's not your fault, you know it's it's discoverers fault, it's capital one's fault, right? So we don't want to charge that. We don't want them to charge you 24 dollars for being late on the loan that you took out from them. We're gonna only let them charge you eight dollars.

Speaker 5:

I think this is it's just a microcosm of the society that we have right now, where the vast majority of Americans are looking to the government and saying, please help me.

Speaker 5:

Help me with the fact that I don't know, I have no financial literacy, I don't know how to manage my, my budget and I go out and I consume. What is it? It's one point one three trillion dollars of consumer debt right now. I mean the fact it's not the, the late fees that's killing these people is the fact that they have no Financial literacy and they don't know how to budget themselves and they don't know how to make more money. This is the problem, not the late fees, and so this is, in my opinion, the Biden administration trying to get people that are Not well off right there, their voter base to fill more warm and fuzzy just a couple of months before the election. Right, it's one more thing, the notched on their belt to say see, we're here for you. We're always taking down those big, bad, ugly banks that are trying to charge you twenty four dollars and we're only gonna make them charge you eight dollars. Just pay your damn bill on time.

Speaker 1:

Okay, there you go. All right, you got RJ Bates opinion on that one. All right, cj, what are your thoughts on this one?

Speaker 6:

That was good, rj, I like. I like how RJ said that towards the end. It's kind of like the same marketing tactic they used, whoever that was, with the stimulus checks. That was good. So look when I, when I look at this right, like this whole Biden late fee, remember that marketing strategy. That was good. So it's like this this cap of a late fee, you know eight bucks. I mean, what are we talking about, right? I mean ultimately, if you got.

Speaker 6:

I don't know if you know that or not, but it in all seriousness. In all seriousness, I'm excited about June getting here.

Speaker 6:

Because, you know, I can't wait to sit back and just observe how crazy people go During election season. I'm gonna, I'm gonna. It's gonna be chilling, as I always am, you know, paying attention to what's going on and just pivoting as needed, whoever's in office. But this, this is weird. Right like a eight dollar credit card late fee cap. I don't know what it accomplishes. I was gonna say exactly what Straton said. I agree 110 percent.

Speaker 6:

This is how industries work, right? Like, if somebody wants to lower their, their late fee, they're gonna lower it. Right, to have more appeal. This sounds like the the Airbnb cleaning fee. Right? You know I? What do we? What do we really talk about? Right, like, you're gonna make it, whatever they make it, and people are Gonna decide to get a credit card with this company or not. The problem is these credit companies, credit card companies, realize that you know People are still going to use credit cards, that they give them credit limits, regardless of what the late fee is, period, so they can keep raising it really as much as they want, because people keep borrowing. Just like, if you've got a really dope Airbnb and you're charging crazy amount for a cleaning fee, if somebody wants to stay there, bad enough, they're gonna agree to pay it.

Speaker 5:

I mean. My thing is is they be really wanted to help out the people because they can't control themselves? Get them to lower the interest from twenty nine point nine nine percent down to where it's capped out at nine point nine nine percent. At least that would move the needle on the amount of debt that they're accumulating at it. I'd be curious to see how much debt was accrued on late fees.

Speaker 3:

I don't think that works, because then there's no debt access and then the company won't exist because they won't make any money. Hmm, right now I get a limit are so high is because there's a high default rate. They still need to make yields like it's because it's a higher risk type of investment for them and the pension funds and everything else, yes, a non-collateralized loan yes, a non-collateralized loan.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, right. So I think like and if you get rid of the fee, then what do you do? They're gonna raise a PR, or we don't raise a PR, they're gonna have a higher annual fee, right. Or if they don't give you a higher annual fee, then they're gonna decline the loan and now you don't have access to credit. Like this idea that you can just remove one thing is gonna fix everything. No, like it's the same way we negotiate creative deals how much money do you want today? How much? What's the price you want later on? What's the interest rate? How long you willing to carry the term? You get to pick two. We'll pick the other two, right, okay, we're gonna reduce the late fees, we're gonna increase the APR, or we're gonna do some amount of credit available, or we're gonna charge you annual fee. Like this idea, like it's just a talking point, and that's what's frustrating about it it's just pandering without actually solving the problem.

Speaker 5:

It's not there to help anybody, because it doesn't move the needle enough and do your point. They'll just make up for it somewhere else.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you have to yeah, the only point of that. The reason why they're proposing is legislation is so that PTD gets more viewers, subscribers, so make sure you guys subscribe right. So that's the first thing. Second thing, I got my buddy, jd Meznar. He's at the US Senate and he proposed a bill. That got a lot of support in the committee and it went to. When I went to the floor it got killed by Democrats. The bill was to require every person the graduate high school has to take a class of financial literacy. Exactly talking about the last few months, financial literacy is a problem, so he was proposing that to graduate high school in Arizona, if they could, at least one class of financial literacy. And they killed on the floor.

Speaker 5:

So what's interesting about you saying that is is the Democrats killed that, but then come out and then the same party now is saying, hey, we want to lower these junk fees. Why would that get killed? I don't understand that.

Speaker 2:

I don't know, guys, the guy that led the charge, his words were don't quote me on. There's something along the lines of financial literacy is not the problem.

Speaker 3:

Jesus. That is the crux of the problem is the finance, is financial literacy from a young age and understanding the way money works.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so. So I told her, next time he submits it, let me know ahead of time so I can go on my soapbox and push this, but yeah, I. Arizona.

Speaker 5:

I would probably guarantee me if you go talk to any. If we pulled people from the age of 18 to 25 and you ask them do you feel like you came out with adequate enough knowledge on Financial literacy and what being an adult was going to be, it would be overwhelming that no, I was not prepared to be an adult and I have no idea. The only way I learned is by failing over and over and over again, unless Someone outside of the school system help them.

Speaker 2:

We got to do that pull from 23 to 27, because from 18 to 22, they're so stupid. Like we got a, they say listen, I was freaking invincible when I was 18, you couldn't kill me when I was 18. Turns out I Was mortal. Right, so that. But from 18 to 22, you think you got all figured out Right. So they would probably make the argument though they don't need financial literacy, right? I can get 1.3 trillion dollars worth of bueno, taco or taco bueno, right. So I think it probably has to be after the graduate college, or if they didn't go to college, then 18 to 22 would make sense, because now you actually have a real-life experience for a financial literacy class.

Speaker 2:

Well, they're arguments for financial literacy class in high school.

Speaker 6:

Yeah, I agree with that 100%.

Speaker 3:

I think you should be learning about it from 12 years old on and just understanding, if you look in the world, that we live in, at least when we grew up, you know, yeah, I went to a kid man.

Speaker 6:

I went to school with a kid reminds me of RJ. He used to carry around this sack of change. Right, I'm not a loose you know. You know I'm not a loose change kind of guy, but I was growing up with this kid. He was a loose change guy, used to carry a sack with quarters in it, but at least he knew how to count money right. These kids now, man, everything's plastic cash app, apple pay you know, they don't even know how to count money really, right, it's not even hardly taught In school. Nobody talks about credit, nobody talks about balancing the check and account, no way to teach you how to read a ledger, right. None of these conversations ever exist. And then, 18, we say to go start a business, you know, go get a credit card, go da, da, da, da da. Oh, I think you got to teach people early about money, as early as they can come.

Speaker 5:

The try to cancel CJ.

Speaker 2:

The cancel CJ.

Speaker 5:

Here's a question I have is why do we make that the legal age to drink alcohol 21, but you can get a credit card that could ruin you financially at 18?

Speaker 3:

I mean it's not ruining you.

Speaker 2:

It's not ruining you.

Speaker 3:

I mean, you could get rid of it, yeah college student loans are way worse.

Speaker 3:

That is like unrevocable, no matter what you do, and you could go get a bad degree with it. I think it's a scary part if the student loan had any like inherent value behind it, that's one thing. But like you go to Fresno State and you get an Africana studies degree. This is like no. Because they put so many student athletes in this, they make them get an Africana studies degree. The only thing that they can do with that degree is go teach Africana studies. You have no other. Like you can't translate it. Well, right, and you can apply that to liberal arts degrees. What on the water basket weaving? It's a joke. But like they offer all sorts of crazy shit. They just want your money and you can go get a hundred thousand dollar loan and that will destroy you because you could declare BK. It's still there, it's not going anywhere.

Speaker 2:

Yeah yeah, I think student loans are way, way worse than credit cards. I mean, credit card that's bad, but doesn't compare.

Speaker 5:

I think the problem with credit card debt in comparison to student loans is is that their Student loans can be beneficial Depending on what degree you are getting right. If you're going to be an attorney or doctor or something like that, it's necessary, it's a necessary evil. I don't think at 18 years old, there is a necessary evil for you to have a credit card. Specifically, we're saying there's something else that you can't do until you're 21. What is the reason why you can't drink alcohol legally until you're 21, but you can make Severely important financial decisions for yourself when you're 18?

Speaker 3:

But then we could poke a hole in that and say that someone could use the money to go out and make a better lives for themselves. Like, they have access to capital now they can go buy leads and start wholesaling. So, like, one of my first students was an 18 year old Like, this kid had just graduated high school and he started doing deals Right to where access you got the, you got the Jalen whites, the Alex signs.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, like you still have those people to where, if they have access to money, they can go out there and do something with it.

Speaker 5:

It may just what percent of 18 year olds you they are doing that. It's got to be less than 1% probably 1% of 1% right. I mean, I hear the argument, but it's that's such a small minority that I just don't think that's a viable argument.

Speaker 2:

I already sounds like a Democrat. He's taking with opportunities for everyone else.

Speaker 1:

Oh, cj's officially left the building now.

Speaker 3:

But what would you guys say about like a 18 year old Steve running around 5 foot 5 just pissing vinegar, yelling at everybody, not knowing?

Speaker 2:

Oh, Five foot five. Shutdown straight on the shut down straight on the football field.

Speaker 1:

All right, we're good, we're done, we're done, I think it's CJ.

Speaker 6:

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Speaker 5:

Yeah, it's you bro.

Speaker 1:

There we go. I think we're fixed All right. There we go. All right, this was a great show. I'm not even mad at this one. I'm really glad that I was here to participate in this one. Looks like Steve won this week. I'm shocked, just like everybody else is. Like I said, he actually came with some knowledge. Super happy about that. I see RJ's face over there. He is the most unhappy leprechaun I've ever seen.

Speaker 2:

So we got a little leprechaun. We got that going on.

Speaker 1:

He's swinging around in his chair right now. All right, it has been a great show.

Speaker 6:

Now he's going in this chair. You're saying his feet aren't touching the ground. This crazy. It's been a great one. Thank you for tuning in to PTD this week.

Speaker 1:

We're gonna go ahead and do some outros, Steve. Go ahead, say bye to the people. Great conversation today.

Speaker 2:

You know there were a lot of stuff that we went and discussed that weren't really necessarily Tied to the topics, but I think we went a little deeper on some of these topics and no, I'm glad I appreciate everyone that we have all all the panels here to provide insight into this. So I'm hoping that everyone is watching. They got a ton of value and if it was valuable for you guys, you know, hit that subscribe button, let's you know. It's really important to me that we help more people. The content that we talk about here today isn't stuff you're gonna see in social media, isn't something to see everywhere else, right? So if you want other people to Digest this content, please share it with your friends, share with your family, share with your colleagues, even like I think Matt said before, even share with people, you don't like.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, absolutely share with your friends, family, enemies, you know, whatever.

Speaker 1:

Hey, just get the word out. All right, stratton, say bye to the people. I thought I had the line of the day.

Speaker 3:

Sorry, women but I thought I had the line of the day. Man Vedas are the worst, but thank you guys so much for having me on. You need a virtual assistant. Your company. Go to virtual help dot IO. Give me Trump or give me death. Is time, boys. Biden is here. You got to take him down.

Speaker 1:

You got to take down old man Biden bro.

Speaker 3:

If they had a good candidate or over there, I'd be all about it. If they had a good Democrat over there who could think, I'd be all about it. What is the Trump train right now? Don't forget to vote. There we go, strat, strat daddy, you find him on.

Speaker 1:

Instagram. You can find him on Instagram. All right, rj Bates, let's go for flex right now.

Speaker 2:

RJ Bates say bye to the people.

Speaker 5:

Just want to point out that I did score the most points today, but every week Potter makes me start in the negatives and so the final score as Steve, as the winner. But on a serious note, our sponsor, acoustic force media and Pat Hilton.

Speaker 5:

He released his book yesterday, the force inside, and it immediately shot up to number one Amazon bestseller in four different categories, and he posted this morning that it's third in the entrepreneur category. So congratulations, pat. That's awesome. I remember you when you were literally walking around local RIA events with an acoustic guitar playing like jingles Around a lot of us about real estate investing, and now you run a seven figure company and an amazon bestseller. So congrats to you, pat. Shout out to pat Hilton.

Speaker 1:

Shout out to pat Hilton Congratulations on that. That's a huge feat right there. All right, cj, say bye to the people.

Speaker 6:

Yeah, bye to the people. Another good week on a ptd. Uh, congrats to uh light skinned steve man on a ferocious victory today of, uh, you know, perhaps valid points, right? Uh, 7 pm Eastern tonight, man, I'm live. Uh, you know, start flipping dealscom. Rj, it's great to see you, men. Uh, happy st Patrick's day, right. Whenever that's coming up, stratton, good to see you as well, man Potter, as always, everybody be good man, peace.

Speaker 1:

Awesome, awesome. All right everyone. Thank you for tuning in this week. We will see you next week.

Real Estate Corruption Scandal Discussion
Height Bias in Leadership Roles
Social Media's Impact on Mental Health
Impact of Social Media on Children
Opinions on Russell Wilson Departure
Biden Administration Credit Card Fee Debate
Financial Literacy and Credit Card Fees
Weekly Update and Shout-Outs