The Proffitt Podcast

Turning Adversity Into Hope: The Story of a Podcast Born from Resilience and Optimism

April 23, 2024 Teisha Rose Season 1 Episode 453
Turning Adversity Into Hope: The Story of a Podcast Born from Resilience and Optimism
The Proffitt Podcast
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The Proffitt Podcast
Turning Adversity Into Hope: The Story of a Podcast Born from Resilience and Optimism
Apr 23, 2024 Season 1 Episode 453
Teisha Rose

Send Krystal a Text Message.

When life throws you a curveball, how do you catch it and throw it back? Teisha, founder of "Hurdle to Hope," joins us to share her powerful story of facing multiple sclerosis and stage four breast cancer with unwavering optimism. Her journey is one of remarkable resilience, not just in coping with her diagnosis but in turning her struggles into a platform for encouraging others. 

We dive into the emotions and strategies behind starting her podcast "Wellbeing Interrupted" and explore how setting a podcast launch date instills a sense of personal accountability and provides a beacon of hope for many facing similar battles.

Launching a podcast presents an emotional rollercoaster, and Teisha's narrative is no different. Starting "Wellbeing Interrupted" was born out of Teisha's dual diagnosis and the following realizations; "I found strength in the unimagined possibilities that reshaped my life's trajectory, and it's from this place of growth that I craft each episode."

The conversation with Teisha isn't just about her story; it's an insight into the creation process, the vulnerability of revealing personal trauma, and the thrill that comes from finding your voice and knowing it resonates with others on a deep, personal level.

Stepping into the world of online content creation can turn adversity into a pathway for contribution, and our episode is a testament to this truth. We highlight Amy Porterfield's impact on the housebound community, the role of mindset in illness management, and how to navigate the perfectionism that often accompanies serious health challenges. 

Anyone interested in Teisha's approach to overcoming hurdles can find the "Hurdle to Hope" quiz at hurdle2hope.com/quiz. And if you're beginning this journey with us, hit that follow or subscribe button for more courageous conversations illuminating the path from adversity to hope.

Grab my new mini-course, the Business Booster Bundle (BBB), and start tracking your stats to make more money with your content and business today. Go to krystalproffitt.com/bc24 to grab the full BC Stack bundle, where you'll find the exclusive BBB! 

Click the "Send Krystal a Text Message" link above to send us your questions, comments, and feedback on the show! (Pssst...we'll do giveaways in upcoming episodes so make sure you leave your name & podcast title.)

How to Start a Podcast Guide: The Complete Guide
Learn how to plan, record, and launch your podcast with this illustrated guide.
What If? So What?
We discover what’s possible with digital and make it real in your business

Listen on: Apple Podcasts   Spotify

FranchiseU!
FranchiseU! is for those in, or considering, careers within the world of franchising.

Listen on: Apple Podcasts   Spotify

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Send Krystal a Text Message.

When life throws you a curveball, how do you catch it and throw it back? Teisha, founder of "Hurdle to Hope," joins us to share her powerful story of facing multiple sclerosis and stage four breast cancer with unwavering optimism. Her journey is one of remarkable resilience, not just in coping with her diagnosis but in turning her struggles into a platform for encouraging others. 

We dive into the emotions and strategies behind starting her podcast "Wellbeing Interrupted" and explore how setting a podcast launch date instills a sense of personal accountability and provides a beacon of hope for many facing similar battles.

Launching a podcast presents an emotional rollercoaster, and Teisha's narrative is no different. Starting "Wellbeing Interrupted" was born out of Teisha's dual diagnosis and the following realizations; "I found strength in the unimagined possibilities that reshaped my life's trajectory, and it's from this place of growth that I craft each episode."

The conversation with Teisha isn't just about her story; it's an insight into the creation process, the vulnerability of revealing personal trauma, and the thrill that comes from finding your voice and knowing it resonates with others on a deep, personal level.

Stepping into the world of online content creation can turn adversity into a pathway for contribution, and our episode is a testament to this truth. We highlight Amy Porterfield's impact on the housebound community, the role of mindset in illness management, and how to navigate the perfectionism that often accompanies serious health challenges. 

Anyone interested in Teisha's approach to overcoming hurdles can find the "Hurdle to Hope" quiz at hurdle2hope.com/quiz. And if you're beginning this journey with us, hit that follow or subscribe button for more courageous conversations illuminating the path from adversity to hope.

Grab my new mini-course, the Business Booster Bundle (BBB), and start tracking your stats to make more money with your content and business today. Go to krystalproffitt.com/bc24 to grab the full BC Stack bundle, where you'll find the exclusive BBB! 

Click the "Send Krystal a Text Message" link above to send us your questions, comments, and feedback on the show! (Pssst...we'll do giveaways in upcoming episodes so make sure you leave your name & podcast title.)

How to Start a Podcast Guide: The Complete Guide
Learn how to plan, record, and launch your podcast with this illustrated guide.
What If? So What?
We discover what’s possible with digital and make it real in your business

Listen on: Apple Podcasts   Spotify

FranchiseU!
FranchiseU! is for those in, or considering, careers within the world of franchising.

Listen on: Apple Podcasts   Spotify

Krystal Proffitt:

This is going to sound a little cheesy, but I'm just going to go ahead and say it. I am so lucky to interact with the most amazing podcasters I am. I have the best community, I have the best audience. I have the best, just most incredible group of people that listen to the show and that hang out with me on a regular basis. So one thank you for listening to this show. But I also want to thank today's guest, Teisha for sharing her beautiful story. So I want to give you a quick background on how this podcast came to be. So it was in January 2024 that I was tagged in our Facebook group. So we have a free Facebook group. It's the Proffitt Podcast online community. If you're not part of it, we would love for you to come hang out with us. But Tisha had said something and I wanted to read it here. She said I want to say a huge thank you.

Krystal Proffitt:

I purchased your course quite a while ago after recommendations in Momentum. This is Amy Porterfield's membership Momentum. I've been part of it for several years and so that's what she's referring to in Momentum. But then stage four breast cancer happened. I have MS as well, and then I literally lost my voice due to muscle tension dysphonia. Over the holidays, I went through the updated version of your course, which is so good. The exciting news is that my podcast, wellbeing Interrupted, is now live, thank you, and I saw this and I immediately was like whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa. I need to hear Teisha's story. You need to hear Teisha's story. We need to share Teisha's story and see what did that journey look like. So I invited Teisha to come on the show and share more about her journey and the ups and the downs and the struggles of getting started with her podcast, because, while I say so, many of her experiences may be unique, I really feel like it's not as far off base for those of you listening, because I know that there is someone listening to this that may be going through a really freaking hard time right now, and I want you to hear Teisha's story. I want you to hear her message for no other reason than I think that there are people in this community who really need to hear it. You need to hear what she has to say, and I am so excited to introduce you to Teisha, so let me give her an official introduction here.

Krystal Proffitt:

Teisha is the voice behind Wellbeing Interrupted and the founder of Hurdle to Hope, with a journey through MS and stage four breast cancer. My focus is all about the founder of Hurdle to Hope, with a journey through MS and stage four breast cancer. My focus is all about the power of mindset. This is what she sent to me. I love this so much. She said my podcast is where I share insights and stories to help you navigate health challenges with a healing mindset. So I won't make you wait any longer. Here's my interview with Teisha. Let's get right to it. Welcome to the Proffitt Podcast, where we teach you how to start, launch and market your content with confidence. I'm your host, Krystal Proffitt, and I'm so excited that you're here. Thanks for hanging out with me today, because if you've been trying to figure out the world of content creation, this is the show that will help be your time-saving shortcut. So let's get right to it, shall we All? Right Profit Podcast listeners, we have a special guest today on the show. So welcome Teisha. How are you today?

Teisha Rose:

I'm very well, really excited to be here, Krystal.

Krystal Proffitt:

Yes, it's going to be so fun. I love talking to people in Australia because I feel like y'all can tell the future. I want to say, oh, what happens tomorrow? Because it's the next day already where you are.

Teisha Rose:

That's so true. We're not behind and we're not, you know, thinking we're back the front and down under and all the rest we're ahead of the game. So.

Krystal Proffitt:

I like that. I like that. Yes, yes, that's so awesome. Well, deesha, I am just so excited because you have a really special presence on the show today, because you are here specifically because you've been through Profit Podcasting, you're part of our Facebook community and you posted about your story and when I saw this post, I was like immediately, like it just came over me and this doesn't normally happen where I'm like you got to be on the podcast, like I need you to come tell your story on the podcast, like people need to hear what it is that you're going through, because maybe there's someone that's listening that has similar challenges, or maybe they're facing something that it's hard for them. They're in the middle of it right now, and so I am just one thank you so much for coming on the show. But two, can you please share a little bit about your own journey with launching your podcast, or even just dreaming about having a podcast? What led up to that?

Teisha Rose:

Yeah, okay, and thank you for inviting me on. It's really. I've spent many a late night listening to your voice putting together the podcast, so it's really great for you know to chat to you in real time. So I decided to do a podcast when I did DCA with Amy Porterfield, so Digital Course Academy, which was amazing, and Amy really drills into you the importance of what avenue of content you want to use. I love talking and I'm a training and development sort of specialist by background, also have done social work, so connecting through chatting is what I wanted to do.

Teisha Rose:

And I was in the middle of launching a course and the course was on MS, because I've been living with MS for over 25 years, so multiple sclerosis, ms, a neurological condition and I was all ready to go. I learned how to do Facebook ads. I was about to put in my budget of $10 a day so not big budget for my Facebook ads and I actually felt a lump in my breast and I couldn't work out what it was. I went to a doctor the next day and she didn't like the feel of it at all and I went through the whole process of having a mastectomy ultrasound biopsy. I found out I had breast cancer. In a mastectomy ultrasound biopsy I found out I had breast cancer. It was such a shock because I really thought I had my disease for this lifetime. But to have MS plus breast cancer was you know, it was full on. I'm trying to process that. But what happened then was I thought okay, I can still do this. You know, I was lined up to have a mastectomy. I thought it was stage two, it was all okay.

Teisha Rose:

Then, just before the afternoon before my mastectomy, I received a phone call and you know it's not a good phone call when it's the surgeon saying I'm so sorry, but. And you think, what's the but? And then I found out the cancer had already spread to my liver and to my sternum up here. So all of a sudden I was dealing with stage four, which is considered I never say like it's considered terminal cancer. I never say I am, I always say I am T, but I won't give energy to that. But all of a sudden I was dealing with a really serious diagnosis. So that's the most terrified I've ever been.

Teisha Rose:

So obviously during that time I wasn't in the headspace to launch my course or even think about a podcast. But as the months went by as treatment started. I responded really well to the treatment and I actually the cancer went into remission within a few months, which was amazing. So I thought, right, let's go. Let's, you know, let's broaden this course. What I'm teaching I always knew would help people other than those just with MS. I just wasn't expecting the universe to give me another disease to apply it to, but it did so. I then created the Healing Mindset course. But then, as I was contemplating and I think you did something on momentum I think you did a masterclass on there and I thought that's the course I need. You know, let's go with the podcast, let's put voice to everything. I got your course, which was amazing. So that was the first version of your course.

Teisha Rose:

I went through that and my voice started going a bit funny and I couldn't work out what it was and I thought something's wrong with my lungs. I was a bit petrified. I thought maybe the cancer's gone into my lungs. I'm not sure it wasn't that. But over the coming weeks, all of a sudden I couldn't say more than a couple of words. So it's like oh my goodness, how can I do a podcast sounding like this? So again, I had to stop and I was diagnosed with something called muscle tension dysphonia. I call it the sound of trauma because I think the trauma of everything I went through it seized up the muscle above my voice box and vocal cords so I couldn't get the words out. So it was very frustrating, extremely frustrating and yeah, so at that point that came to a bit of a standstill my dream of having a podcast.

Krystal Proffitt:

I mean, I'm trying to think of, like what is the opposite of a mic drop right, Because I feel like it's still, it's like it's a mic drop worthy moment, but also to know how much struggle was in all of that journey, like I think it's just a story of sheer determination, of this thing popped up, and then this thing, and then this thing, and then all of the challenges that come with life. You know, and I know that someone is listening right now and they either have struggles of their own or they're going through something really hard with a loved one. But what I see and what I hear in your voice is you had a message that you knew you needed to share and that drive within you. I mean and it sounds like I'm not going to put words in your mouth, but it sounds like that message just it was coming Like nothing is going to keep that message from saying no like I'm putting this out into the world.

Krystal Proffitt:

This is, this is happening. Like you know, you throw this at me. Well, okay, that's going to sidetrack me. And actually you said something before we started recording I would love for you to share. You said that you have a motto or a life philosophy. It's like, oh, like I just I won't take it from you. Like, share with us the thing that you were telling me before we started recording.

Teisha Rose:

Yeah, and this the irony of this with someone who has spent a lot of time with MS in hospital, paralyzed, unable to move, and I've realized even in those moments the Chinese proverb about be afraid of not going slowly, be afraid only of standing still. And for someone, at times, who is completely paralyzed, you realize you can still create momentum in your mind, your outlook or your response to all these hurdles that keep coming. You can still gradually keep moving forward. And what happens and I think what happens even when depression hits is that you're stagnant, you're thinking I've got no options, I can't move forward, I don't know what to do. But if you just start slowly moving forward, then you create that momentum that things start happening.

Teisha Rose:

So I talk about the silver lining in having this cancer diagnosis has been my MS. So at the beginning I thought how unlucky is that Two diseases, and it is a bit unlucky. But I think the silver lining has been MS, because I've been through so much early on with MS that all of these mindset insights have applied to cancer, but also applied to things like the podcast, because if you take that concept and put it to a podcast, it's like okay, my voice isn't going to allow me quite yet to get more than two words out. But what can I do? Krystal's updated her course. Excellent, I'll take this time to go through your updated course and then, okay, I'll start listening to other people doing podcasts. I'll see what they're doing. I'll start writing blogs. Come up with ideas how to get my ideas onto paper. Surely that will help with the podcast. So you see, I kept moving forward without actually hitting the record button.

Krystal Proffitt:

Yeah, and I mean the like. Hearing you speak about this, like the, the words that pop into my head is unlimited optimism. That's really what it sounds like. Like. Instead of cause, I could see someone feeling so defeated. You know like one thing like pops up and you're just like, oh, you know, well, that's a sign that I shouldn't do this, or something else pops up, that's a shot, like I should just quit. I should quit, but I feel like that optimism is the thing that's like well, that's okay that I can't. You know, my, my voice isn't working today, because I have 50 other things that I could look at doing. I could do research with my audience, or I could listen to these other podcasts, I could dial in my format, or I could do this. I feel like that is just unlimited optimism and I'm so curious have you always been that way? Or is that something that came with maybe some of your earlier diagnosis? And you said you know this is. I don't know. How does that look for you in your life?

Teisha Rose:

Yeah, I've struggled with the term. This is. I did a podcast episode about this and it was about talking about positivity and talking about early on, I think I slipped a little bit into toxic positivity because I was scared of exploring my authentic emotions and I thought, well, if I feel like this is awful, I'm scared and all those emotions, then that means I'm being negative, whereas now I realize that that's not the case. You can have a positive outlook which I was that person before MS which comes in handy when you have something like that. But this time, with cancer, I've been a lot more authentic to my emotions. So I've got a positive outlook as to the outcome of my cancer diagnosis absolutely, but I'm authentic in the feelings that I'm going through, but that helps me to keep moving forward. So, yeah, I think it's really important to be authentic, but to have that positivity and to be optimistic and I think what MS has taught me and I talk about unimagined possibilities because with MS, I grieved when I was diagnosed as a 22-year-old I'd just finished two degrees at university, my first ever graduate program, corporate job, and then, within six months, I was diagnosed with MS, never been sick before so when I was 25, spent months and months in hospital unable to move.

Teisha Rose:

But what I like reflecting on. When I was 26, I booked a ticket overseas and spent the year by myself, travelling, and I wanted to put a line in the sand and think when I look back, what's my memory of my 20s Travelling the world by myself, not lying in hospital bed? So there's so many things you can do to shift your focus, to become more optimistic.

Krystal Proffitt:

Well, I love this approach and because you said you've done a podcast episode about this, we're talking about your podcast. Can you share with everybody the name of your podcast and how you landed on it, because I would love to hear that part of your story.

Teisha Rose:

Yeah. So my podcast is called Wellbeing Interrupted and that really goes to what we're talking about. Is there's so many interruptions that come our way? I wrote a book back when I was 49. Now, when I was 40, I wanted to write a book, so I did and it was Life Interrupted. So I've always been on this.

Teisha Rose:

I guess how I see the world is that things are going to hit us. You know, we don't know what's coming, we don't know what hurdles are going to come, what's going to interrupt us. But it's our response to that hurdle that will define our experience. And for me, well-being interrupted is our well-being physical well-being, emotional well-being, spiritually. We will be interrupted. It's a given. We all share that. But let's do a podcast about saying what do you do, how do you reclaim your well-being? And that's what I want to share insights. And I think podcasting is so powerful because me, as a 25-year-old, lying in a hospital bed, petrified about my future, if I had me as a 49-year-old in my ear, I didn't have a mobile phone back then but if the 25-year-old now had their AirPods in and was listening to me saying it's okay, feel the emotions, but unimagined possibilities can still happen to this to get through. That's powerful. So that's what excites me so much about the possibilities with a podcast.

Krystal Proffitt:

Yeah and like. So, as you are on this journey of you're like, okay, this is, this is kind of on brand with you know you, you've written this book. You have your podcast. Now, as it's unfolded, have you hit any parts of planning your content or, uh, putting together this, the different pieces of whether it's the formatting or anything? Have you hit like a big snag where you're like I don't know if this is really where I want to go, because I mean, we were talking before. You know, we started recording that you're just a few episodes in. Like you're still in the very beginning, like so many people that will be listening to this show. Like it's not like Teisha's sitting here saying, oh, and now I launched the 300th episode. Like you're still in the beginning stages. So is there one piece that you're looking at that like now, as a podcaster that's been doing this a little bit, you're thinking if I could go back, I would give this piece of advice to myself. Is there something that stands out to you?

Teisha Rose:

Yeah, not to be scared and just to be natural talking, you know, and it's not. Yeah, I listen back even to the first episodes and it was. I was scared that my voice wouldn't hold out and I wasn't. I was like I don't sound like me. I'm like, oh, you know, very polished and not natural. And I think, no, I want the person listening thinking they're having a chat, not natural. And I think no, I want the person listening thinking they're having a chat. Um, and I thought I don't know if I'm up to doing interviews yet and I thought that's ridiculous.

Teisha Rose:

I worked as a social work counselling people. I can have conversations, you know. So that for me is like, yeah, I, I put in like I'll do, say, 20 episodes by myself, and it's like, no, let's just change this as it happens and let's be flexible with it and just enjoy it. And I remember in the course you said it can feel a bit funny talking to yourself in the room and sort of, but I'm loving it, it gives me permission, like I love talking, and like my partner Andrew is like, just go in your room and talk to yourself.

Teisha Rose:

So you know, I'm loving this. It's very therapeutic for me, I think as well. So yeah, but I do think don't get so stressed about it. It's about a conversation, it's not a presentation.

Krystal Proffitt:

Yeah, yeah, and I love that you said the word therapeutic. I've had so many people tell me that, especially if it's something that is cathartic for them, they're talking to a previous version of themselves, like you were saying, the 25-year-old with this brand new diagnosis, or someone for my audience. At times I'm speaking to someone five that you know, I had no clue what I was doing and you kind of get into that mind frame and it is therapeutic if you make it that right, if you find a way to really settle into. No, you're helping people, like if you can make it about your audience and not about yourself, like am I too high pitched? Am I speaking too fast? Am I speaking too slow?

Teisha Rose:

Am I high.

Krystal Proffitt:

Like all the things you get out of your own head. I feel like it's easier, so I love that you shared that. I think that's great.

Teisha Rose:

Yeah, absolutely, because we do. We pick ourselves apart and it's like what for? And when my voice wasn't right and I wasn't going to do it, I thought this is ridiculous. I'm connecting to people going through health challenges but I want to wait till I'm perfect and sound like I normally sound and that will stop me giving my message to people who need it. I said I need to model that behavior, that it's like yeah, our bodies aren't what they were, my walking's not great, but then I can be open about that, and I was opening an episode earlier on about using a walker.

Teisha Rose:

I didn't want to use a walker and I thought I'm not modeling great behavior there. You know, I'm saying other people, get out there, embrace life. We've just bought 100 acres of land and I'm sitting back watching everyone else walk around it because I don't want a walker. So now I've got like an off-road walker that goes over all the rocks and everything and I'm keeping up with everyone and I think so that in itself has helped me, you know to, and yeah, so I'm hoping it helps other people to really reflect and think that's ridiculous, worrying about what other people think. Using a walker, do it, enjoy life and no one will notice anyway.

Krystal Proffitt:

Well, now they can't keep up with you. So, oh my gosh, that's so funny. Well, Teisha, I'm thinking about all the different decisions that you have to make, cause this is, this is where I think a lot of people, when they come to me with their podcast and they feel stuck because they're afraid that they're gonna make the wrong decision, whether it's about their podcast title, their podcast artwork or the format Like you said earlier, it was like solo or interview. So should I do 20 minutes? Should it be two hours? All these decisions come at you at the beginning. So was there any point, either when you're going through the course or you know, you're just dreaming about your podcast where you found yourself with a really hard decision? Or maybe there was one that was just like, oh, this is the easiest decision of the whole process. Like, can you just talk about decisions in general? Was that hard or easy for you?

Teisha Rose:

Your course made it really easy. Like, your course was excellent and I can say that as a student it was very good. And what I did was it was between sort of Christmas and New Year, and I love that time because it's when sort of time stands still and you don't know what time it is, what day it is and all. So I binged you during that time and it just meant I think the sticking point for me was going to be the tech stuff with it all and I was like, no, I'm just going to do it. And it meant I stayed up until 2 o'clock because I'm like I can't come to bed because then I'll forget what I'm meant to be doing and I'll just stay. So that was great and I think it's not being overwhelmed by things like that and that's a great lesson for learning for anything. So I just broke it down into those steps and it just made it manageable.

Teisha Rose:

And I did get a bit scrappy with things. We were out for Christmas and I'm like I'm looking okay. Let's, you know, take some photos that I can maybe use in Canva to do the you know title and the cover of the podcast. So we did that and you know we're in the foyer area and I was like doing all these different poses, and Andrew's like, yeah, yeah, yeah, and we're doing my photo shoot amongst all these people on Christmas day, but everyone's happy and all. So I think things like that.

Teisha Rose:

For me at the beginning it's like whoa, this is too overwhelming. But by breaking it down and thinking I can do this look at all the other people who've done podcasts I can do it. I can do a better photo shoot later on, doesn't matter, I want to get it done. So, yeah, just not being stuck on perfection. I think that's great being part of Amy Porterfield's world as well. It's always the progress, not perfection. I was such a perfectionist and I think that's half the reason why I pushed myself too much and got too sick with MS and it's like I'm not going to get sick, you know, with a podcast.

Krystal Proffitt:

And it's like I'm not going to get sick, you know, with the podcast. Yeah, I think the thing for me that I can always kind of push past all the stuff in my head where it's like, oh, you should do this, and then it's kind of just lands on done is better than perfect, is whenever I see on the horizon a date. So whether it's a deadline date or it's a launch date or it's a specific like, oh, I'm going to speak on stage, I need to make sure that things are you know, x, y and Z is ready by that time. So this is just like for anybody that's listening if you have a specific date in mind, it makes it easier to make those decisions because you're like it doesn't matter, you got to choose. Whether it's A or B, it doesn't matter, you gotta choose. Whether it's A or B, it doesn't matter, you gotta choose it. But I love that. Teisha, you just look at it as it's okay for now, like whatever I have is good enough for now, and I can always hire someone to take super fancy studio pictures later, or I could do this or do that. But it can always be changed and you can always update it in the future.

Krystal Proffitt:

I've rebranded my podcast multiple times now, speaking of Amy Porterfield, she just recently rebranded her show, so you can absolutely change things in the future. But I'm curious was there any part of creating your course that was? Or your course, your podcast, that was the most fun? Like one piece that you're just like oh, this was. You were just delighted in, whether it was one of the lessons or one of the specific pieces of you know, doing your marketing or figuring out your content, like, was there anything that was? Just it surprised you by how much fun it was.

Teisha Rose:

I think the trailer like it was really cool, having the music and all, and I like listened to it in the car. I think the trailer like it was really cool, having the music and all, and I like listened to it in the car, I took a photo and like I'm listening to myself on radio, yeah, so I really liked that and it was really good, like lots of friends and all like, wow, this is great. I feel like you know this is going to be something really good, so I felt like that got the energy, so so, yeah, so it was just that you know a minute and a half, but it was just that feeling, having good music with it and all it was. It was great.

Krystal Proffitt:

It just felt like, you know, it was professional, so it was great and I love that because I feel like that's when I like tell people like you're officially a podcaster, even if you haven't published like a full blown episode as soon as you put that trailer out there, like you're a podcaster. It's not just this like dream thing and I love that so much. Like that just reminded me of how many times people tell me they're like oh my, like it's real, it's like it. It takes all of these ideas and these dreams of everything that you have, and then it's like, oh no, it's a real thing now and it's coming to life, this dream, this message that you have. So I love that. That's so beautiful.

Teisha Rose:

Yeah, I agree, and it is, and it makes you do it. Then it's like whoa, the trailer's out Gonna have to make it happen. So yeah, it's putting it out there.

Krystal Proffitt:

It's that deadline that you're putting on yourself. You're like wait.

Teisha Rose:

If I put the date in there, I have to make sure that this is live by that date it's built in accountability right.

Krystal Proffitt:

We can all use a little bit of that.

Teisha Rose:

That's right, I can.

Krystal Proffitt:

Well, I want to talk about. You know, I feel like I could ask you a million more questions about your podcast, because this is what I love. This is why I love having people from this community come on and share about their own journey, but I want you to go back to the night before that very first episode went live and just tell us what you were thinking Like. Let us know. Like, were you excited? Were you nervous? Were you having some of that imposter syndrome? Like, oh my gosh, like no one's going to listen, or I just I, am I doing the right thing? Did I start with the right episode? Or was it just pure excitement? What was that like for you?

Teisha Rose:

Yeah, I think, a little bit nervous, because I was very open in the first episode about the trauma, about getting that phone call from the surgeon, what that meant and all. But what I was also happy about, I think, was I did it in a way where I set the scene for how I want to do things. In that first episode I talked about myself, but then I cut it off and said it's not just about me, you're going through things as well. So what I want to do with this story is show you the three things I did to prepare myself to meet my oncologist for the first time. To meet my oncologist for the first time.

Teisha Rose:

So I think that was I was excited to get that out, to make it a little bit different and see what the reaction was and lots of reaction, mainly from friends and family and all listening to your first episode. But it was really positive because they said we hear lots of stories but let's find out how did you get through it? So yeah, so I was nervous exposing myself like that, but then I think from the outset I've got to be authentic If I'm wanting people to then come on as guests and really open up to the emotions they're feeling the struggles they have, then I need to start from the very first episode in doing that myself. But yeah, it's surreal, though, and I did what you said, like I'd recorded a couple of episodes, so it was like I told everyone binge listen to me for a few episodes. So it was good. I felt good, it felt like right, we're going.

Krystal Proffitt:

Yeah, oh my gosh. So what are you most looking forward to, then? As you, you know you're you had just said that you published your sixth as of us recording this. So what's your? What's the next thing that you're looking that you're excited about? Do you feel like you've hit a groove? Do you feel like you're still just getting started? I mean just getting started. I mean because I feel like, in between the first episode and about the probably the 10th or 20th, there's somewhere in there that you feel a stride, where it's whether it's your recording weekly and you sit down and you finally have that one day where you're like I got this, like this is, I know exactly what I'm doing. Have you hit that point? Are you still like? I feel like I'm fumbling a little bit and I'm trying to explore what you're trying to make it your own, like, where do you find yourself?

Teisha Rose:

Yeah, I haven't got into the groove quite yet, um, but it's getting a bit better. Where I see myself, I want to get guests on, like I really I feel good that I've almost probably up until episode 10, we'll set the foundation in terms of this is what my approach is Like. I did one episode about really challenging the narrative we use with illnesses. You know talking about you're in the fight of your life or you know the battle narrative, and also I'm putting it out there.

Teisha Rose:

These are my beliefs, this is what you know I want to present to everyone. And then, once I get to that, I want to get guests in to talk about some of those topics. So I think once I get the guests in, then I'll feel like, yeah, it's a bit more natural to sit in by yourself just talking about these great ideas you think you've got. So I'm looking forward to that and I think when that happens I'll feel like I'm in the groove. But I like that that it's a sort of 20 episode mark, because I think that's what it will be. It'll probably be 10 solo, 10 interviews and then we're like, right, where do we go from here?

Krystal Proffitt:

Yeah, and I love to tell people, you know, as you start exploring your topics whether it's solo or interview keep building on whatever you've already created.

Krystal Proffitt:

You know, if you find yourself in a conversation and a topic comes up, you could just easily and you don't have to do it during an interview, you could do it like in the intro or the outro of the episode but say hey, you know, we talked about this in today's.

Krystal Proffitt:

You know, constantly going back and referencing the things that you've already talked about, because it's likely that you'll touch on some things but you're not going to go as in depth as you may have in a previous interview or another solo episode. I mean, you don't want to constantly repeat yourself in that way, but I love it when you can say hey, you know, if you enjoyed today's episode, make sure you check out this other one, because then that binge listening or binge consuming of people's content can really happen, because you're sparking that connection that they're like oh, if you're interested in this today, don't worry. Like, keep, keep doing your dishes or keep folding your laundry, because we got more stuff to do and we got a full episode that you could check out too. So I love it when people do that, because I'm like yes, I will keep listening.

Teisha Rose:

Yeah, that's great. That's great. See, I've learned more. This is my private lesson, but yeah, that's great, and I think it is. It's those themes, because at the end of the day, you haven't got a hundred different specific ideas, but it is. It's evolving and, as I'm living through cancer now, my ideas which were born from MS, are evolving, you know, because I'm now applying it as someone who's 25 years older, but with a completely different condition. So we're always evolving, which is good.

Krystal Proffitt:

Yeah, oh, my gosh. Well, like I said, I could keep asking you so many questions, but I actually, before we get into our next segment of rapid fire questions, do you have any questions? Like you said, let's take advantage of the time that we have here. Is there anything that you feel stuck on or anything that you want want to chat about for a few minutes?

Teisha Rose:

Yeah, I think it's the marketing and reach you know, because it's you think I'm starting to do more on. I haven't got a big social media following like it's at Hurdle to Hope. That's my business is Hurdle to Hope and my course is related to that as well. So, yeah, it's that reach you get beyond those who are already in your world, so hoping things like this Krystal help going on people's podcasts and all as well. So it's just about what's the best ways to get more people listening to my message.

Krystal Proffitt:

Yeah, I think. Well, you just touched on it, guessing on other people's podcasts especially. You know now I think I was reading something the other day that podcasts might be up to I think, close to 5 million now in 2024. Like, we're at 5 million or so podcasts that are out there, so there's no shortage of, you know, well-being or health or even things that are kind of adjacent to the health and wellness space, whether it's motherhood or you know specific life stages. You can absolutely go and target those audiences too. That would be kind of like the casting a wider net to your audience, because you do have a topic that would touch, like it's not, like that is siloed from every part of your life. You're like, no, that's actually the part of the foundation of your life, and then everything has to be built around. You know your health and fitness and you know the way that that you are able to move through this world, and so I would just sit and brainstorm who are some of your connections, who are some podcasts that you can reach out to, and if anybody's listening and you're in this space and you're like Teisha, I need you to come talk on my podcast, then please she's in our Facebook group, reach out in the Facebook group and say Teisha, we need to talk, because I think that our group is such a great resource to mingle and chat with other people and we'll make sure that we put up. We need to put up another like podcasters connect post where people can do some podcast interview swaps, because I think those are great.

Krystal Proffitt:

But outside of getting on other people's podcast, the one thing that I will tell people is what I have seen that works really well is partnerships, and by partnerships I mean this could be strategic business partnerships, like, for instance, for me, I, you know, I work with Buzzsprout, I work with ConvertKit, I work with other industry experts or industry companies that talk to other creators. They talk to podcasters. So I would sit in and explore like, who are some of the people that you could partnership and we're not necessarily talking about sponsorships yes, that you know. Hopefully a partnership could eventually lead to them paying you for content. But what are some companies or businesses or services that you can really start promoting? You love what they do so much. Maybe it's helped you in your own journey and how can you partner with them so that they can also help you elevate your message?

Teisha Rose:

Yeah, that's great. I'm taking notes in my podcast interview, that's great, it's awesome.

Krystal Proffitt:

We love to see that.

Teisha Rose:

No, that's great and it is. It's working with other people and I loved, when you did a Momentum Masterclass, how you talked about using your podcast in your launch, because I've got my Healing Mindset course. Now what I want to be known for is my Hurdle to Hope roadmap. So what was amazing with Amy Porterfield in terms of DCA was I'd written about the health acronym and the different stages I'd navigated through from hurdle to hope. What she did in terms of going through that course was bringing that into a roadmap and then taking people through. And that's what I, you know I want to be known, obviously helping people through my story, but it's that roadmap that I want people to connect with. So I can very much see my podcast supporting that as well.

Krystal Proffitt:

Yeah, and talk about your roadmap. You know as much as and this is where you know Amy covers this a lot in a lot of things that she teaches, like what should be free versus what should be paid for your content. But I think, when it comes to having a specific roadmap or having having a framework, um, you know Heather Sager, she talks about this a lot too. It's like if you have these, uh, buckets of you know, your content can live in these different places, where should you put it? And I always just default to being really generous with telling people what it is and then letting them know. Yeah, and if you want to go deeper on this, then you can get it in.

Krystal Proffitt:

It's behind the paywall for some of it, but I love talking about the really important pieces that can help people take a small action to get them to the next place. But then maybe they need that guidance to help get them to that finish line or help them accomplish that goal. But I always lead with generosity when it comes to those kinds of things, and it always comes back tenfold. That's what people tell me like you're giving away too much, like you share way too much information. People could, you know, listen to your podcast or watch your YouTube channel and I'm like that's fantastic because they're going to tell 10 other people about the podcast. They're going to tell 10 other people about my YouTube channel, so I never worry about that anymore.

Teisha Rose:

Yeah, yeah, that's great and at the end of the day, I want to help people going through this. So if that roadmap can help, then you're right. If they want to explore further, great. But if not, let's get you through the crisis at the beginning. Yes.

Krystal Proffitt:

Oh my gosh Teisha. Like I said, we could just keep going on and on, but we're going to get to these rapid fire questions.

Teisha Rose:

So said we could just keep going on and on.

Krystal Proffitt:

But we're going to get to these rapid fire questions. So are you ready for them? I hope so, okay, well, what is the? Our question number one is what piece of advice would you give to a brand new podcaster or content?

Teisha Rose:

creator I think it goes again back to what we talked about earlier is not being afraid to go slowly, you know, just be afraid of standing still. So just take small steps, even if things like cancer come in the way or losing your voice. Just know that you can still keep moving forward towards your goal. I think sometimes, when people are hit by obstacles, it's like not going to happen. Like you said, it's a sign it's not meant to be. So. No, if you truly believe you're meant to be podcasting, then just keep moving towards that goal and don't be deterred.

Krystal Proffitt:

That's great. That's great. Okay. My next question is what is the dream podcast you would love to be on and who is your dream podcast guest you'd love to interview?

Teisha Rose:

From a personal perspective, I'd love to be on the Radical Remission Project because that's sharing stories of remission from significant diseases. So I figure even I'll give it I don't care if it happens in five years, because in five years that means I've been in remission from cancer and also MS for five years. So they do amazing things for anyone who has significant illnesses or cancers. It's an incredible podcast, so I'd love to be part of that and sharing my story of remission.

Krystal Proffitt:

Yeah, and then what about a dream podcast guest like to interview? Who would you want to interview on your show?

Teisha Rose:

I actually think I would love to connect to Amy Porterfield because I think so many people living with illnesses give up on their career and that's for me. It was impossible and I was like I was so frustrated because I knew my body wasn't supporting me getting to an office or doing that lifestyle, but I had so much to contribute, you know. So, cognitively, I was never impacted by any of my conditions. So what she does in terms of enabling people who feel housebound to connect and get their message out there, yeah, I think it's amazing. And and to say thank you like team, like I'm not getting paid by team Porterfield, but what they did when I was diagnosed with stage four, like the breast cancer, I used like a purple emoji just to say this is what happened and all the rest. Two days later, amazing bouquet of purple flowers are at my doorstep from their team. They're not doing that for anyone else to know.

Teisha Rose:

It's not like I've, you know, told other people much at all, but it's like that's the connection and I love the impact she has in terms of using your mindset because and I said that as well in that group your mindset, being an entrepreneur, is very aligned to dealing with a health condition. So, people living with a health condition, if you're listening to this, you're evolving. You've got so many skills you can apply to a podcast, to, you know, an online course or whatever business you want to do. So don't think that you're not evolving and growing because you're dealing with cancer or whatever it is. So there's beautiful alignment there. So sorry, that wasn't a quick fire, but that's the answer.

Krystal Proffitt:

Oh my gosh, we have to give a shout out to team Porterfield because they are angels, like I mean and that's not the first story that I've heard of you know just just quiet generosity, if you want to call it that, but it's.

Krystal Proffitt:

it doesn't need any recognition, it just it. It just goes to show you and this goes back to what we were talking about with partnerships earlier they are the people that I love to align myself with. I love to proudly say I team up with Amy Porterfield and a lot of the things that I do. I feel like she comes up constantly People that aren't Amy Porterfield fans. I'm sorry.

Krystal Proffitt:

They probably left a long time ago because we talk about her all the time and I'm like oops, sorry, because she's had such an impact on myself. And I love hearing your impact too, and I know that it's why she does what she does is to have an impact and really help people, like give them the tools. So I I love that so much. So, team Porterfield, if you're listening, you need to share that in the next team meeting, that that is like y'all are doing. Y'all are doing great things. Great, yes, that's right.

Teisha Rose:

So so Brittany and Megan as well, the other two that really reached out, so just in case they're listening.

Krystal Proffitt:

Thank you, that's perfect, that's perfect, all right. Well, tisha, my last question is do you consider yourself a perfectionist?

Teisha Rose:

A reformed or reforming perfectionist? I definitely was, definitely was, and that's why I got so sick with MS, because I would go to work, hardly be able to walk, ring up my neurologist, meet him at the hospital, get my steroids for a few days, go back to work. And it wasn't until I lay in that hospital bed totally paralyzed and thinking what am I doing? Why am I jeopardizing my health for training at a telecommunications company? You know, know, not saying there's anything wrong with that, but and so that.

Teisha Rose:

And that's the gift sometimes of an illness, and almost I don't want, like I'm not wrapped, that I've had MS as in my 20s, but it makes you be more present in your life from a very early age, makes you not be perfectionist, because I keep thinking I don't want the cancer coming. It's in remission at the moment. I'm not going to push myself to stay up all night to get the perfect podcast episode If that means somehow my cancer will think, okay, she's not respecting our presence here anymore. So yeah, so I try very hard now to use my health to stop me into my old habits of perfectionism. That's so good.

Krystal Proffitt:

It's so good and I love that you share that. I love all the stories that you shared today. They were fantastic and if somebody's listening and they want to know more about how they can connect with you or maybe they're listening they're like I got to have Teisha on my podcast Like where do you want people to connect with you? Where can they learn more about your hurdle to hope business and all the things that you're doing?

Teisha Rose:

Yeah, so my website is hurdle to hope number two, so hurdle number two, hopecom, and on there you can connect. I've just put out a quiz which basically shows you where you are on the Hurdle to Hope roadmap and what I give you a couple of activities of what you can do to keep moving forward. So definitely go. The only thing you do on that website is to connect to that quiz. It will really help you enter the Hurdle to Hope world and, you know, get my insights as to how you can keep moving forward.

Teisha Rose:

And, yeah, my podcast is Wellbeing Interrupted and I would. I'd love to. As you can tell, I love chatting. I could talk to you for ages, Krystal. So, yeah, anyone who wants to chat, you know I'd love to be on your podcast, but also you know the other way around, once I start doing interviews and it's great energy to align yourself with people who are faced with different things, but we learn from each other. So some people say but I haven't got cancer or I haven't got MS For me, they don't define me, it's not about my conditions at all and it's about what I've learned in response to both of those diagnosis. So for anyone else, I don't want anyone to think well, yeah.

Teisha Rose:

I haven't been through what you've got, or we're talking about something totally different. It doesn't matter. It's what we learn that we can share with each other.

Krystal Proffitt:

Yeah, and also I think it's. You know, there's also the audience of people who may have loved ones that are going through something hard too, and I think about. You know there's podcasts that I'll listen to that help me understand people that are different than me and all of these beautiful ways that I would have never understood had I not listened to it. So I really encourage you. If you're listening to you know this and you're like, oh, Teisha, like the teacher was saying, I don't have these diagnosis or I don't have, you know, the same symptoms or the same, like the same struggles that someone else is going through. But if you can listen to other people's stories, that's the piece that really connects us and solidifies all of us as creators, and I hope that you go check out Teisha's podcast. Thank you so much for being on the show today. Like I said, we could chat for so long but we have to go, so thank you for being here with us.

Teisha Rose:

Oh, thanks so much. It's so good. As I said before, it's good to like. I've heard your voice a lot, but it's good to talk in real time, so I appreciate the invite.

Krystal Proffitt:

Wow, I mean just wow. I loved hearing Teisha's story. I loved how vulnerable she was in sharing so much of her just ups and downs and all arounds, and it never knocked her off her game, right? I mean I'm sure it slowed her down and, you know, knocked her off her game, right. I mean I'm sure it slowed her down and she shared about her struggles very openly, but it was just so damn inspiring and so motivational to see that she had so much conviction to share her message and to get it out into the world to help.

Krystal Proffitt:

Even if it's just one person, even if it's just one person that hears her message and they are motivated to change something in their life that will help them have a better healing journey, it's all worth it, right? That's how I think of content. When I think about content, I mean not intentionally. I'm not sitting around thinking of someone that's going through a really hard time or struggling with something, whether it's medical or family related, or they're taking care of a loved one. That's not the go-to person that I picture in my mind when I create this podcast. I'm typically thinking about the person that wants to love creating content, and maybe they're just confused or they're struggling or they're overwhelmed and they're like, oh, I'm just so close to it that I really just can't figure out the mechanics of loving it.

Krystal Proffitt:

And I feel like Teisha has really stumbled upon something that makes her message so special, and it's that she's sharing from a place of love and hope and just so much inspiration. So again, Teisha, thank you so much for coming on the show. This was such a special episode and my heart is so full after recording it with you, so I wish you the best of luck in your podcast Again. Go check out her show it's Well being Interrupted and go check out Hurdle to Hope and see all the cool things that Teisha's doing. You can actually go to hurdle2, like the number two hopecom forward slash quiz to check out what she is doing over there. But that's all I have for you today. So if this is your first time tuning in, make sure you hit that follow or subscribe button wherever you are listening and, as always, remember, keep it up. We all have to start somewhere.

Overcoming Challenges to Start Podcast
Navigating Challenges With Unlimited Optimism
(Cont.) Navigating Challenges With Unlimited Optimism
Podcast Creation Process and Excitement
Podcasting Strategy and Partnership Discussions
(Cont.) Podcasting Strategy and Partnership Discussions
(Cont.) Podcasting Strategy and Partnership Discussions
Inspiring Stories of Overcoming Adversity
Promoting Podcasts and Well-Being

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