Wits & Weights | Smart Science to Build Muscle and Lose Fat

Ep 43: Lose Fat and Feel Great Using Mindset, Consistency, Endurance Training, and Longevity (Coaches Roundtable)

January 31, 2023 Episode 43
Ep 43: Lose Fat and Feel Great Using Mindset, Consistency, Endurance Training, and Longevity (Coaches Roundtable)
Wits & Weights | Smart Science to Build Muscle and Lose Fat
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Wits & Weights | Smart Science to Build Muscle and Lose Fat
Ep 43: Lose Fat and Feel Great Using Mindset, Consistency, Endurance Training, and Longevity (Coaches Roundtable)
Jan 31, 2023 Episode 43

Today is a first for the show because we are doing a coaches roundtable with 5 amazing people in my inner circle—whom I would consider friends at this point—who are making an impact on peoples’ lives—both active and aspiring nutrition coaches and personal trainers.

These incredible women and men each have a unique perspective on health and fitness and agreed to come together despite being in different timezones all around the world, to share their experience and expertise to help you thrive and achieve physical self-mastery.

After all, that is the mission of this podcast and why I’m constantly looking to bring on experts who share that mission, even if we use different paths to get there.

We will be covering nutrition and training, women’s health, navigating social situations, tracking your food, endurance sports and ultra-running, how to be more consistent, and longevity, just to name a few.

You'll learn all about:

  • Managing stress and "getting out of your head" to achieve your goals
  • How to navigate social situations and still enjoy your lifestyle
  • Setting up your environment and support structure for success
  • Why tracking your food can be helpful
  • Ultra-running training and fueling your endurance training and events
  • Celebrate the small wins and focus on consistency more than intensity or volume
  • How to "peacefully" achieve and sustain your fitness goals
  • Healthy from a longevity perspective: unique health hacks
  • The importance of nutrition vs. training

Episode resources:

Send me a text message!

Support the Show.


🎓 Join Wits & Weights Physique University

👩‍💻 Schedule a FREE nutrition/training audit with Philip

👥 Join our Facebook community for live Q&As & support

✉️ Join the FREE email list with insider strategies and bonus content!

📱 Try MacroFactor for free with code WITSANDWEIGHTS. The only food logging app that adjusts to your metabolism!

🩷 Enjoyed this episode? Share it on social and follow/tag @witsandweights

🤩 Love the podcast? Leave a 5-star review

📞 Send a Q&A voicemail

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Show Notes Transcript

Today is a first for the show because we are doing a coaches roundtable with 5 amazing people in my inner circle—whom I would consider friends at this point—who are making an impact on peoples’ lives—both active and aspiring nutrition coaches and personal trainers.

These incredible women and men each have a unique perspective on health and fitness and agreed to come together despite being in different timezones all around the world, to share their experience and expertise to help you thrive and achieve physical self-mastery.

After all, that is the mission of this podcast and why I’m constantly looking to bring on experts who share that mission, even if we use different paths to get there.

We will be covering nutrition and training, women’s health, navigating social situations, tracking your food, endurance sports and ultra-running, how to be more consistent, and longevity, just to name a few.

You'll learn all about:

  • Managing stress and "getting out of your head" to achieve your goals
  • How to navigate social situations and still enjoy your lifestyle
  • Setting up your environment and support structure for success
  • Why tracking your food can be helpful
  • Ultra-running training and fueling your endurance training and events
  • Celebrate the small wins and focus on consistency more than intensity or volume
  • How to "peacefully" achieve and sustain your fitness goals
  • Healthy from a longevity perspective: unique health hacks
  • The importance of nutrition vs. training

Episode resources:

Send me a text message!

Support the Show.


🎓 Join Wits & Weights Physique University

👩‍💻 Schedule a FREE nutrition/training audit with Philip

👥 Join our Facebook community for live Q&As & support

✉️ Join the FREE email list with insider strategies and bonus content!

📱 Try MacroFactor for free with code WITSANDWEIGHTS. The only food logging app that adjusts to your metabolism!

🩷 Enjoyed this episode? Share it on social and follow/tag @witsandweights

🤩 Love the podcast? Leave a 5-star review

📞 Send a Q&A voicemail

Philip Pape:

Welcome to the Wits& Weights podcast, where we discuss getting strong and healthy with strength training and sustainable nutrition. I'm your host, Philip Pape. And in each episode, we examine strategies to help you achieve physical self mastery through a healthy skepticism of the fitness industry, and a commitment to consistent nutrition and training for sustainable results. Welcome to another episode of Wits & Weights today, the first for the show, because we're doing a coach's roundtable with five other amazing people in my inner circle whom I would consider friends at this point, and they are out there making an impact in people's lives. These incredible men and women include active and aspiring nutrition coaches, and personal trainers. And each of them has a unique perspective on health and fitness. They agreed to come together despite being in different time zones. We've got folks in the morning in the evening, the middle of the day, all around the world. And they're going to share their experience and expertise to help you thrive and achieve physical self mastery. After all, that's the mission of this podcast is why I'm constantly looking to bring on experts like these who share that mission. Even if we use different paths to get there. We'll be covering nutrition training, women's health, navigating social situations, tracking your food, endurance sports and ultra running, how to be more consistent and longevity, just to name a few assuming we get to all of those. Without further ado, let me introduce everyone, and then we're going to dive into the questions. So I want to give each coach a chance to kind of take the floor starting with Elaine Tarbell and Elaine, how're you doing?

Elaine Tarbell:

Good, thank you.

Philip Pape:

So Elena's from Oskaloosa ah knew I'd get it wrong. It's near Des Moines, Des Moines, Iowa. It

Elaine Tarbell:

is near Des Moines. Yep. Okay.

Philip Pape:

Oskaloosa, Iowa. She's a personal trainer, gym owner of tar Bell's barbells. Gotta love the name. And she's a nutrition coach. Elaine uses her experiences and knowledge to help other women achieve their goals in a kind and compassionate way. And she specializes in women's health, both nutrition and weight training. So again, Elaine, thank you for being on the show. Yeah, thank

Elaine Tarbell:

you very much, fellas, I'm very excited to be here.

Philip Pape:

And so am I it's gonna be a fun conversation. Moving on this there's six of us, but I don't have to introduce myself. So we're going to next go to Michele Moe. And I might be calling her Moe during this conversation because we actually have two Michele's with me on the call today. Michele is from Charlotte, North Carolina. She's the owner and head coach of Moe stronger nutrition and fitness. They teach people how to eat foods they love, lose weight, Feel Great maintain it for life, and she helps people navigate the aging process with positive results. Michele, I appreciate you for coming on the show.

Michele Moe:

Thank you so much. I'm glad to be here.

Philip Pape:

All right, our third coach today is Erin cartridge from Brisbane, Queensland, Australia In Australia, right. Erin is a nutrition coach with a passion for endurance sports. He helps aspiring ultra runners sift through misinformation in the sport and maximize their performance. Air man's pleasure to have you on.

Aaron Cartridge:

Good to finally have a conversation and thanks for having me.

Philip Pape:

Awesome. And maybe we'll have a chance to talk about all those lives you've been doing on Facebook. All right, next up is Michele Clark, who currently lives in Florida but she's originally from Brazil. She's a fitness and nutrition specialist helping women of all walks of life to learn how to nutritiously and peacefully achieve and sustain their fitness goals. I want to say that peacefully because it already is calming me down. Michele, I'm so glad you were able to come on the show as well.

Michele Clark:

Yeah, absolutely. Thank you so much for having me.

Philip Pape:

Awesome. Now it's gonna be great. And then let's get to our final coach of the evening or the morning. Last but not least is JC from Inverness in the Highlands of Scotland which I understand is is the the mouth of the river that's connected to Loch Ness that we all know about right to share we're just give them a wave. There you go man and JC may even show off his attire for you at some point if you're watching the video we'll see. Some people are like what are you talking about? You'll see just think Scotland you know what I'm talking about. So, alright, so JC is a health longevity and nutrition student who dabbles in biohacking and holistic healing. He explores why in our ever ever developing world were going backward in terms of mental and physical health and he helps people with their longevity goals. JC thank you for coming on. That's me. It's good to be here man.

JC:

Good to finally meet y'all.

Philip Pape:

This has been fun. We had a whole conversation before recording this and I think people listening are gonna get a ton from this because every single one of us is so unique. We also have a different different to bring to the the nutrition space and we're chatting all The time and helping each other help our clients. So that's how we grow. I'm going to start with a lane with the first question. And we'll give everybody a chance with, with at least one question to start. And then we can just kind of go back and forth. A lane I understand most of most of your clients, they have stressful lives, right? They struggle to get out of the mental space, get out of their heads. And I'm sure there's a lot of people listening, who are also stressed out, how can people take care of themselves? How can they build that confidence to achieve their goals?

Elaine Tarbell:

Yeah, that's a really good question. Actually. I think just kind of reiterating what you said, people, it especially women, they're so used to taking care, like, if you have children, they're so used to taking care of their children and meeting everybody else's needs. There's a lot of people pleasing, women are kind of ingrained to take care of everybody else before it's taking care of themselves. So when it comes time to taking care of themselves, there's a identity crisis. There's like this, I don't know how to do that. And, you know, when you become an adult, you don't have parents to tell you how to do those things anymore. So a lot of times, I feel like in coaching women, there's a lot of like, I have to almost be their mother in a way like, Well, did you go outside and go for a walk? Did you eat breakfast? Did you drink any water today? Like, have you done the basics? And sometimes we're like, Oh, yeah. And it's it, you know, sometimes we get so stuck up here. And we're overthinking the process, we think we've got to do this 90 Day Fix, we've got to do this cleanses, detox, there's all this, you know, social media bullshit, or we let go.

Philip Pape:

Threshold we're good. Just certain words, you know,

Elaine Tarbell:

there is so much crap out there that is being shoved down our throats, and we have to be a size zero. And we have to be able to get the kids this nutritious lead perfect meal all the time. And meanwhile, we're neglecting ourselves. So sometimes it's just a matter of coming in and just saying, Hey, are you getting those basic needs met? Because if you're not, then we need to start there.

Philip Pape:

You know, the thing he mentioned at the beginning resonated with me how people are missing the parent figure. And that's what they need. I mean, how often do we even reach out to somebody who is close in our lives, who isn't even our parent for support, I probably rarely happens. And you can be that person for them. Right? You can be someone that they don't have an emotional attachment to. And, you know, I know, I look at it as I can mansplain and get away with it with my clients, because they're asking for help. They're asking for information, you know, so what are your thoughts on on that?

Elaine Tarbell:

Yeah, no, I, I, I actually kind of had this, I guess, you know, like, I'm one of my walks, I had this conversation with myself about it, like, I don't, I didn't have parents that were there to guide and instruct me, they were just sort of like living in the moment. And they've, you know, they've, they've not been good role models, I guess you could say, and when I became a parent, it was my absolute determination to be a better mother than what I had experienced. And I have found that in my own struggles, I, you know, there's times where I still grieve that loss of a parent, not just because maybe they're not here on this earth is neither here nor there at this point, but just that emotional connection to someone that would guide me to becoming a better person and having that deep desire within myself. And seeing so many people are disconnected from who they are. And from having someone to look up to. I just Yeah, I feel like coaching is very similar to being a parent, you have to set boundaries and expectations. And you don't have like this, like you have to meet this expectation, but you have to have some kind of an expectation for for your clients. And they have to be able to willingly reach for that in order to feel like they can make some kind of gain and success not just physically obviously because we're all here to help people achieve some kind of physical fitness but also to achieve some kind of mindset and mental growth.

Philip Pape:

Yeah, and isn't that such a huge part of this, but for a lot of people it is about mindset, and consistency and accountability. Cool. So the format of this show today's is a little awkward because I'm gonna tend to jump from person to person instead of the continue on that flow because I could probably ask you 10 More questions. That lane but we'll come back to it. I'm sure you're okay getting the spotlight. But you know, if anything resonates with anybody that's really strong, just jump in, even if it is in this first round. If you want to comment,

Michele Clark:

I do. There's something that I want to add to that. In a nutshell, where Elena was saying, usually what I tell my my clients, especially parents, I always tell them, you can pour from an empty cup, right so You cannot teach you cannot lead unless you're doing it we lead by example. So we have to be the role model so that we and that's how we influence people, right? It's not by telling them, I can tell you for sure. It's not by telling them you got to do. In coaching, obviously, it's a little different. But we, but we also do what we preach, right? So, we are influencing. So yeah, we cannot pour from an empty cup. That's all I wanted to say.

Philip Pape:

That's great. Until you find that being a coach is its own form of accountability. Absolutely. Oh, yeah. It almost makes it I don't want to say makes it makes the whole thing easier, but you just have dozens or hundreds of followers online or whoever's following you, holding you accountable. And you've got to act apart. Absolutely. Everybody who's listening, you know, maybe they want to become a coach. Okay, so I'm gonna move on to moe Michelle, how you doing?

Michele Moe:

Hello. That was great. I just want to say to Elaine answer that very well. You know, one thing I may just add, right before, just before you ask me, what you're gonna ask me sorry, is, you know, it's how we talk to ourselves. Sometimes, too. I think it's easy to talk to ourselves in a different way in our head than we would maybe a friend to make that shift toward the way we speak to ourselves in light of our weight loss or what what we're doing toward our goals, I think, to make that shift, and it takes time it it takes practice, to get to that point where you tell yourself that you can achieve these things.

Elaine Tarbell:

Yeah, yeah.

Philip Pape:

Yeah. For sure. Now we can we can continue on that Mo. If you want. We can. No, no, that's so yeah. I mean, there are a lot of little situations we're going to cover here that I think the listener be curious about how to deal with and one of those a common struggle that, that you've talked about is navigating social situations. Right? And how do you help clients enjoy their lifestyle? Right? Because that's, we talk about that all the time, especially we came up through NCI, we talk about periodization, we talk about sustainability, and not restricting and all of those, so how do you help people enjoy their lifestyle? Yet, you know, they still have to achieve this goal. That's going to take some hard work and some change.

Michele Moe:

Okay, funny you asked that, because because I just did a whole video on that the other day, a couple of things I do. First of all, I have the client, look at the situation, the holiday, the barbecue, party, whatever they're going to what are you going there for? Well, you're going there to enjoy family, friends, the event, you're not going there for the food or drink. That shouldn't be why you go, you're not going to say Oh, I can't wait to go there and get drunk or eat like an asshole. You know, that's not the point. You're going there to enjoy family friends, go to the beach vacation. So keep that in mind when you go there. It's not about the food, the food's a benefit, but that's not why you're there, go there and enjoy the people. Okay, the food is great. Second thing I would say is, so the first thing was just don't make it about the food. The other thing is, don't make every day, any event, a special event every day every week. There's holidays, there's anniversaries, there's birthdays, there's your kids soccer tournament, whatever it is, we have these things throughout every year, we all have maybe one a month, maybe two a month. But in the whole scheme of things, this shouldn't be your everyday life. Everyday can be a celebration. And then the third thing I would say so keep it in moderation. Don't make every day like Wednesday night. Oh, great. Let's have some wine. It's Wednesday. That can't be a thing if you're trying to lose weight, right. So the other thing is, I would plan it. Think about these things. You don't end up somewhere saying whoopsie I ended up at a barbecue now I have to eat and drink. No, you know these things are coming. So just plan it and let's plan it with your coach. Let's work toward that and say, Oh, I have this thing coming up. How can we work through it? How can we come up with a plan to where you can still go and enjoy it and still meet your goals? Because you shouldn't go there with guilt. You shouldn't go say Oh, I just ate and drank some things I shouldn't. Or let's take that as an untracked meal. There's nothing wrong with one untracked meal in a week one untracked meal out of the whole week will not blow your plan and your goals.

Philip Pape:

Yeah when on track plan below, like you're saying true true.

Michele Moe:

Eat like it's your last meal on Earth. I really love to but those aren't. Exactly well that's another point is eat before you go I'm the kind of that I'll be sitting in the car and we might be going to any event where there's going to be food and I'm eating food in the car on the way there. My husband's like you're crazy, but I'm over there eating my protein bar or my turkey wrap or whatever it is because I live that day. So I'm starving. And then I want to eat everything in sight also. And one more tip. So I'm sorry, I have a lot of tips on this. Don't sit near the buffet, get a plate, put food on a plate and go sit down and eat what's on your plate. Don't sit there and graze. Because if you sit there and you're going to talk to your friends and you're at the buffet, you're just going to sit and eat all night, get a play, and that's what you're going to eat. And then if you want more, you, you're forced to go back and get more food.

Philip Pape:

Yeah, those are awesome tips. I like the second one you mentioned. I don't hear that talked about a lot. The fact that we always say, well, you're going out for the weekend. So you need to plan but why does the weekend every day every week have to be this special thing? I mean, you can have a routine weekend hanging out at home or, you know, whatever. But

Michele Moe:

I like to use with a client is don't let don't let your weekend be your weekend. WTE ik don't let your weekend be your week. And oh, yeah.

Michele Clark:

Oh, clever.

Philip Pape:

That's a good one. All right, cool. So let's, that's a great point and move to the next. Next victim here, Aaron. So we've all got it, we've got it, we've got the screens ordered, and everything. So if people are on video, they know who's next are watching the video. Erin, you're you're on the endurance, endurance and ultra RAM, which is not something I'm familiar with at all I've I've run in my life, and I once train for a half marathon, and it's as far as I got was training for it. It's good, you know, except for a few obstacle course races. But I do have a lot of respect for something like an ultra marathon because of its scope and ambition and the amount of training you have to do you know, it's not just distance. It's a massive amount of distance and all sorts of planning that goes behind that. So what is involved in training for an ultra? Is it just lots and lots of cardio? Or is there more to it than that?

Aaron Cartridge:

Definitely more to it than that. But that doesn't take away from the fact that there is lots and lots of cardio. So for example, if you're, if you know you're going to do a run, and you're going to be on your feet for 12 to 36 hours, there's no, there's no compromise, you have to condition your body, you have to condition your ankles and your feet, your back and everything. And the only way to do that is to train on the terrain that you're going to be, you know, racing on. So yes, you definitely, you can't get away from the fact that you need to spend a lot of time on feast during the morning during the cardio. But I think a lot of traditional training plans, they overlook the importance of strength training as well. So, I know, looking at my my history when I did 100k back in 2019 I definitely overlooked the strength training. And when I finished a month or two laser hadn't stopped training so much and my body was just broken. Because all I've done all I've done was so my alarms going off. Something to wake up with was the thing and I just hadn't really worried about bulletproofing my body and getting that structure super strong. So yeah, it definitely it definitely made me reflect and train differently moving forward. So core work, anything that helps you get up those hills faster, but also as bulletproof as the body is, is definitely necessary.

Philip Pape:

And you mentioned I like like how you mentioned I guess the specificity of training right training within the terrain but also strengthening extremities and joints in areas like maybe your calf muscles or ankles and things is that does that come with the the training itself on the terrain? Or is that do you also do special strength training movements for those you know, isolation areas? Are those joint areas?

Aaron Cartridge:

Yeah, look, I really like unilateral training anything that because some people a lot of people recommended Okay, well you do your lunges, do your will do squats and deadlifts. You know for a few groups on the trail when you're running, you're never stood on two feet. So I really like any stability work and anything that's unilateral. Quite explosive training. So you're going from left to right. Yeah, anything that gets you to jump. But then also it's important then just to think full body anything that's rather than isolation. I think that if you are limited the time you're better off doing full body work and make sense and unilateral stuff.

Philip Pape:

Cool. Yeah. So like, bilateral stuff might be focusing on the hamstrings focusing on the the quads and the calves right, but unilateral might be what step ups and lunges and whatever Every month, let's

Aaron Cartridge:

see is only focusing on the same muscle groups. But rather than doing is a deadlift, doing a single leg deadlift, so you're holding weight on one side, saying with your same with your squat. So if you hold a heavy kettlebell and your left hand, and do a squat, it's all about that stability and getting you're, you know, looking for any weaknesses. And then you're really focused in finding those weaknesses and focusing on improving those things. When you're fatigued as if you've been on the trail for 10 hours, and you've still got another two or three hours to go, you can bet that those weaknesses as well will definitely sneak up and make you wish you'd

Michele Clark:

like thinking about it.

Elaine Tarbell:

Sounds kind of fun.

Aaron Cartridge:

Definitely. It's a mental game. I think this is what drives a lot of people to the trail running, and especially the endurance efforts, because, you know, most people aren't trying to break any records, you have some crazy elites, and they're doing these things like, you know, just incredible sort of times, but the vast majority of people who are the age group that like the highest performing age group, typically for these ones are 40 Plus, like 40 to 50. Because it's a lot of people, ex athletes, and they done the explosive stuff. But now they realize that they can slow everything down, and just competing against itself. Because yes, there's that mindset mind game of knowing that you've just got to push on planning every step planning, you know what you have for the next checkpoint? How much water you're going to drink, how much food you're going to drink? What are you going to do when your body starts saying, we probably shouldn't push on anymore? Like, how would you control your thoughts? So there's a lot more to it than cardio, cardio cardio?

Philip Pape:

Night. So you're obviously the expert in this. And we're going to come back to that because I want to cover some other things like, like you mentioned, fueling and nutrition. And also, maybe you alluded to overtraining, and some things people can consider, you know, because you're the man stalks about that. So, maybe even touch on like, what, what it makes sense for a beginner who's getting into it, versus like you mentioned some of these ex athletes. So I want to move on to Thanks, man. Thanks, Aaron. We're gonna move on to Michelle, the other Michelle, Michelle Clark, how are you doing?

Michele Clark:

Good, catching my breath after all this, this marathon talk?

Philip Pape:

Yeah, it can be intimidating. You know, I talk about lifting weights as being this amazing thing. And it's just in reality, I don't want to be doing that. So now, talk about we're gonna get into mindset, again, which is a common recurring theme, when it comes to anybody who's listening who's trying to improve their health improve their fitness, your big focus is on consistency, more than intensity or quantity volume. Tell us about your approach to celebrating the small wins.

Michele Clark:

So So yeah, I am you're right, I am big on like doing it, right. I always say that, Don was always will always be better than perfect or not done, right. So what I, what I try to coach my clients on is on just doing it, you know, just get yourself started. Don't overthink it, don't you know, don't don't worry about how long it's gonna take, not only in terms of what they're doing, like the exercise itself, but also how long it's going to take for them to achieve their goals. Don't worry how well you're going to perform, you know, intensity, none of that, because I think that the majority of people based on my experience, and actually, I'm speaking from my own experience, not only the people that I work with, but also my own experience. I think that when we overthink and try to plan too much, although planning is very, very important. But I think that the first step is just getting started in creating that consistency, right? So again, what I try to tell them is like, Okay, you need to start walking more, right, we need to start increasing your, the amount of steps you take daily. So we're going to start with five minutes, you just have to go you just get your sneakers on and just, you know, just go don't worry if it's going to take five minutes because what I what I see is like, sometimes we won't do it. They won't do it because it's like, oh, I don't have an hour to go for a walk right or to get on the treadmill. But you don't need an hour. You just need to create the consistency because if you go five minutes, you're gonna see that you're gonna end up doing it for 10 You know, you're gonna do it for 15 for 20 And if you really don't have the time that's okay, you still go for only the 510 minutes that you have, and and work on the cars See, and then we're going to worry about the time. So that's what I do when it comes to moving more, right. And the same goes for food, I always tell my clients to focus on the next meal, right. So like the meal that's that they you're gonna have next. So if you're wake up in the morning, you your focus has to be you have to be focused on your breakfast, do the best you can with your breakfast, right? I was going to say, Don't worry about your lunch, but you do have to worry about it. Because there is some we know that planning is needed, right? You can just, you can you know, the clock can hit 1212 o'clock, and you're like, oh shit, what am I gonna eat? Right? So we do need planning, but I I, I take more the approach of taking baby steps, right? So focus on breakfast, do a good job with breakfast and celebrate that celebrate the fact that you had your protein, right, that you didn't loaded yourself up with refined sugar or, you know, simple carbs, do that, get that out of the way. And then you think of lunch, right? And so on, and your snacks and all that. And I find that that really works, you know, when and I tell them and if you struggle with it, you know, if it's like 10 o'clock, and you're already struggling? I? So I don't know if that's a good thing, but I have I am very easily accessible to my clients so they can reach out to me and be like, Oh my God, I don't know what I'm gonna do for lunch. And I'm like, okay, all right, take a deep breath. And let's get that out. You know, let's let's focus on that. Don't worry. I don't know what I'm gonna have for dinner. Mike. Wait, but what did you do for lunch?

Philip Pape:

Yeah, so I mean, everything you're saying. It's, it's funny, you mentioned planning is important, but also taking actions important, right? Because we do. You know, as coaches, you would love to have this grand plan for the next six months, where everything's mapped out and your workouts are mapped out everything. But that's not reality. And like you said, if, if that gives opens the door to excuses, which is things that we're talking about here, when people say, Well, I don't have running shoes, and I can't take an hour and I can't do this, and I can't do that. It's like, well, you can take five minutes like that is a fact you can do right. So how do you what's practically how do you do that? Or how would somebody listening? Do that? Right? Because it's that initial momentum. I think that that initial motivation, we call it that eventually, you don't require the motivation, right? Somebody do that.

Michele Clark:

To me, it's more like doing it not debating not trying to negotiate with yourself. I feel like every time I try to negotiate with myself, it goes badly. It doesn't go well, you know. So I'm gonna speak my, by my own experience, as all of you now know, I'm expecting so I am now almost, I'm 14 weeks now. But what I was going to say is that the first the first trimester was very challenging for me. And I'm very active, I've been very active. And I have kept a very well balanced diet for the past 12 years, I think. And, and then all of a sudden, I'm feeling nauseous, and I cannot work out or eat the foods, the amount that I'm used to eat, right. And that hit me really hard because I had control over over everything, a lot of planning, you know, and all of a sudden, I'm like, okay, you know, here, here I go, here I am I what am I supposed to do now that I no longer have control? Luckily, it's going away. So things are getting are getting better now. But to answer your question, what I what I have been doing what I did while I was feeling very, you know, nauseated, in what I'm starting to do now, I don't think about it, you know, I'm like, Okay, I don't have an hour to go lift weights. I can't lift yet, because I'm not quite there yet. I'm still not 100% In terms of how I feel, but I'm like, Okay, what is it that I can do? And I don't think about I literally just put my sneakers on and I go for a walk. And sometimes I'm able to go for 20 minutes, sometimes I end up doing it for an hour and a half. You know, but I don't negotiate because the reality is if I do I'll be like ah, but but remember you pregnant you're not feeling so great. Oh, you go later you go tomorrow. And and I find that most of the people that I work with struggle with that, you know, so don't do focus on the on the task at hand. Like just do it. Obviously now for like people that work full time for instance, you have to have some sort of plan, right? You can't just stop and go you have to so so that what I tell them is like okay, oh, I leave the house too early or I come home too late. Right. And then I have husband kids, whatever. What I tell them is what can you do? Can you do it at lunch? How long is your lunch break? Oh, I have an hour lunch. Okay, great. How long does it take for you to eat? Oh, it takes me 15 minutes. Okay, so what do you do with the next 45 minutes that you have? Right? And, and that's when they start to I swear to you, I was off, right? Exactly. I worked with this with this one girl who was doing phenomenal. And she tried to convince me that she had no time. I have no time. And then I started to ask her all these questions. And she's like, okay, yeah, but I wouldn't have time to do this. And then I can go to she doesn't work from home. And she was like, well, but I can't, you know, I can't really go to a gym. Now. I can't afford that. I'm like, Okay, let's focus on why you can do now why you cannot do right. Turns out this, she started walk around in town, she works downtown. So she would eat her lunch. And then she was she would go for walks. And, you know, she found herself walking for 40 minutes when she thought she had no time. Yeah. Go ahead.

Elaine Tarbell:

I was just gonna add, I like to ask people, or at least look at their schedule and see where are the pockets of time? It's off. And even if it's 10 minutes, everybody has 10 minutes somewhere. So

Philip Pape:

yeah, and you probably are spending time on things that you could substitute for other things. Haven't quite realized it yet.

Michele Clark:

And feel it? I don't think I spoke so much. And I don't think I actually answered your question. You talked about celebrating small wins. And then what I tell them is, once you do that, even if it's only five minutes, you celebrate that, you know, you give yourself a little tap in the in the back and you say good job, you did it. You know, five minutes is always gonna be better than then. Than 01 good meal a day, a complete meal, you know, with all your macros, bro protein, good carbs, vegetables will always be better than zero good meals, right? So I encourage them to celebrate all the little tiny wins.

Philip Pape:

I agree. That's super important. Because I've seen clients in our check in early on that. I asked them when their wins, and they're like, I didn't have any wins this week. And then like, okay, that opens the door to some really good I love I love it. I might have, I might have to show you your wins, because you probably have 10 right in your data or your check in right. But it's that shift in mindset and that's there to help with to support them with so maybe the person Listen, people listening. If you struggle with that, we'll hear what Michelle is saying that their wins every day. That can be the smallest thing like you got up you're breathing and you're walking around and enjoying the planet. I mean, it could be anything. Right? Alright, so this is really good stuff. We're getting deep. Let's let's go John or JC has been chomping at the bit right. Last Last but not least, and nervous. Yeah, it would have been your fireplace here. You got too hot yeah, all right. So I'm really glad you came on because your focus is very different in some ways from from us, you know, it's much more toward longevity. Sometimes we'd like to split our goals into things like physique or body composition goals versus say performance versus longevity right living a long life and being optimally healthy and not necessarily chasing some of those other things all the time. And I can always count on you to teach me something I've never heard before because I mean your your group chat where you share all this interesting stuff what's what's your personal routine because I want to start there so that people understand how you live your life right and so we know that you walk the walk and then you know later on we can get into some hacking concepts personal routine for your health and longevity

JC:

personal routine see I could probably go my my daily routine so my daily routine would be a general routine general teens more minimize stress and focus on sleep and family time and move and stretching and stuff but my daily routine I would say sorry I'm sitting on the floor here I'm seeing you Elaine you're moving about to I'm sitting on the floor Yeah, so the morning I usually start off in the morning, cold shower, cold shower in the morning which is st app is a process called a toughie G happens as well when you're going to cold shower so it kind of know if you know that you know about that but it's the process of autophagy is your sales and your body so when you go for a cold shower you get cold and hot therapy and stuff too. And a cold shower basically but the autophagy eliminates all the bad cells in your body and it recycles all the all the cells that are kind of can still there's still something in them you know but they just want us all yourself. So first thing in the morning cold shower. I'm getting my kids into cold showers too that's good fun

Aaron Cartridge:

Scottish winter

JC:

definitely. So a Yeah, we try and do some some grinding in the morning like grinding is a lot easier in the summertime. And just know it's not very you know you don't really fancy you don't say you did mine just to you know the last

Philip Pape:

well explain what grounding is when people

JC:

grounding is basically just getting outside and your bare feet and stand on the grass if you can get in the sand or somewhere good. I was getting to find out that if you stand on the tire because I'd be at work is my day job as an electrician so we lunchtime we sat in the van nice day outside, we're looking like a total idiot to people that don't know me and know what grind it is. And I was I was doing it for ages for the whole year. And then you can't grind on tar on

Philip Pape:

you because because it's gonna scorcher feed off.

JC:

Yeah, well, grinding. Grinding basically the earth is full of different energies. And basically it kind of recharges you. We're never taught this. And we don't know this, but I've looked at quite a few studies and a few scientists talking about it. And But yeah, if anyone's interested in blending look into it, but that's why I'm the middleman you see, because I know a lot, a lot of stuff. A little about a lot, but not a lot about a little you know. Yeah, but grounding is really good. In the mortar I always always hydrate in the morning. So I usually have probably between 507 150 milliwatts or so we have a filter process in our house or hold all our water in the house is filtered as it comes in a top bar. And I've also got a reverse osmosis machine. So normal water for the day, I've put in my stainless steel bottles no BPaaS. So yeah, so I have that in the morning. I have my vitamin C. So I try and have vitamin C three times a day, a sorbic acid so that just boosts the immune system. Whilst I do just try to think I've obviously gotten my meals like you're saying your macros your proteins, prioritize proteins.

Philip Pape:

Your your vitamin C, how much do you take? How many how many teaspoons?

JC:

Probably about half a teaspoon if I'm honest, about half a teaspoon or just two times a day. About three times a day. Yeah, yeah. And that's that keeps the immune system keeps it going. Yeah, it keeps it good. Yeah. Through the day, other supplements I do, I'll try and do some fish oil, some krill oil or something like that depends because it's quite expensive for the good stuff. And I'll also do I'll always do my sorry, my main systems, magnesium. Magnesium is good. So you need magnesium. Yeah, I've I've actually read some really cool studies. And there's a guy, Clive to Carl. He's a really cool guy. He had the chronic joint pain and stuff at 30. And he was in hospital, trying to give them all this medicines anyway, your mom basically long, long story short, he cured himself with magnesium, high doses of magnesium sorted out, it's incredible, incredible. Some of the stuff you know,

Philip Pape:

is just just to take a pause on magnesium, like my wife had massive migraines for years, and she started taking more magnesium and they either have gone away or significantly mitigated. And other people have had sleep issues and take it at bedtime and help someone sleep. So you're right. It's pretty great mineral that we're lacking.

Aaron Cartridge:

Magnesium, I think I think we can all agree with the ultra running.

Philip Pape:

We don't agree with everything else JC but the magnesium actually, you know, it's funny,

Michele Clark:

another cold shower.

Philip Pape:

I mean, all of a sudden you're saying I've heard you right? You're getting cold showers. There's definitely plenty of studies to say there's there's good stuff there like saunas and other. So here's the thing, I actually do want to ask you this follow up question because just like what the conventional nutrition folks cover, it can be overwhelming for people at first, right? It's like, oh, I have to only do these 15 different things to have a good healthy life. Similar with your stuff, you know, I even think that like, am I going to do cold showers I'm gonna do this and that the other what's like the top one or two things that somebody would focus on and want to prioritize sleep,

JC:

sleep all day sleep and stress. That's the two that make an assistant I'm trying to put together just now it was like a jigsaw. Imagine a big jigsaw. And our health was that jigsaw. But the jigsaw is not like any other Jigsaw that's got small parts that all come together. There's big parts and the small parts, and you need them all for optimal health. And like you said, it's funny you said two because it's always the two for me is stress. Sleep.

Philip Pape:

Yeah. And that's, that's the one that always gets like short shrift, right? When we talk, okay, any training, any walking, you need food. And by the way, nice restful sleep like not that we all necessarily message it that way. But I think it's often received that way, at least in my opinion. And even today, sleep is something I struggle with. And I know I should prioritize it more than I do, because it's gonna help everything else. So cool. All right. Well, we're gonna, yeah,

JC:

so the, I think Elaine nailed earlier on as well. She said about the pressures for women nowadays, you know, to be a size 11 stuff. I think there's a pressure for everybody. And there's a pressure for us to make more money and work more hours and there's pressures from all in so I think, on that basis, sleep kind of does take a backseat and stress is obviously heightened because you're spending less time with your family. I mean, we're here live, you know, your work to live not live to work and the world's changing a lot. I mean, if you look like 4050 years ago, and not a chauvinist, we would say like a man would work. And a woman would say, I'm not in that at all. But I mean, like, one parent would work and one parent would look after the children, and that one parent could afford everything, you know, they could afford holidays, you got a good lifestyle. But nowadays, kids are all shunned off to be serious and whatnot, and we're not living enough, you know, and I think that's a major problem today. But that's another story. You know,

Philip Pape:

I bet you resonate with a lot of people are listening to it. Yeah, there's just, it's a matter of change. I mean, you sleep stress. We all have a lot of stress, especially as we're probably somewhat edging on workaholics, as coaches, right. But sleep is a huge mitigator of that. I know what I have, like, an extra half hour sleep when I get up in the morning. I'm ready for the next half day to get stuff done. Right. And it's a mitigator. So all right, really cool. I see. We're really filling in the time well, here. And I want to get back to some other topics. This is awesome. You know, we're gonna maybe in the future, we'll peel off and have a couple couple at a time. You know, this is great. So I guess back to Elaine, we want let's talk. We've touched on nutrition a little bit, you're a personal trainer, right? But you're also training your nutrition coaching cert? Why is nutrition important? You and your clients? You know, how do you help them achieve their goals there and kind of the merging between personal training and nutrition?

Elaine Tarbell:

Oh, that's a good question. Because sometimes it's really hard, you know, when I'm training, or I'm hired as just a personal trainer, and we're talking food, food, and like, I have this one client, and she fast all day. And then dinnertime kids game on. And I looked at it, I was like, How long have you been doing this? And she was like, several years, like, five, six years, I was like, I don't know what to say like, I'm just kind of shocked, like, I mean, and I said, Well, I mean, studies show that's actually really not very supportive for your metabolism. And if you're hiring me to personal training her goal, you know, everybody has their goals. And her goal was to have runner's legs without running it. So I just said, you know, if we're going to be going through this process, I need you to understand that you're going to have to have some form of energy when you come into, into training with me. So if you're going to train like an athlete, you also have to eat like an F. So you have to have things for recovery, you have to have foods for energy. And you have to also think about like, if you are a woman or even a man, you have hormones that play into effect as to how conditioning is going to affect and nutrition is going to affect all that. So I don't try to ever cross the line unless it's being asked if someone wants to directly ask me, I will directly answer. If they're hiring me for both. I do have one client that she is, she works with my husband for personal training, but then I trained her nutritionally. And so there are times where I will, like this is kind of a funny thing. But I remember going to my husband, and I'm like, Okay, so I'm gonna call her Mary, Mary is starting her cut. So I need you to back off on some of her her cardio type. I don't want to putting her under too much stress, like keep pushing the weight. But please take away some of the some of the added stuff, right? And he didn't, he didn't listen to me. He forgot. So a few weeks later, a few weeks later, are checking in with her. I'm like, How are things go? It's just like, I was so tired. And I just don't have any energy. And I'm just like, what's going on? I pulled them aside. I was like, why didn't you? You know, and I just kind of so it's kind of the fun part about returning with my husband and having that duality, I guess. When he's, he's got one, we have the same client, but we're meeting their needs differently. And that's where communication is huge. When it comes to training a client both in the gym and in nutrition. I find it's probably easier to do both. If you have like, if you have a client and you're able to program both things for them, it's probably a lot easier than or at least knowing what their training program was going to look like which in this situation. I wasn't. I had no I had communicated.

Philip Pape:

Yeah, I hear what you're saying. Right? Because a lot of there's personal trainers, nutrition coaches, you don't often see it packaged together, but what you do, and I know in my case, a lot of personal trainers, it's like the opposite. And I can't control what they're doing with them. I try to coach them on that as best I can. But that's cool. So maybe Moe let's let's go into nutrition a bit. You talked about Some other hacks or practices, I should say, I want to call the hacks, practices like setting up your environment for success, right? Or, and tracking your food, things like that, how important are are doing those things, setting up your environment, from a planning purpose, and also the tracking food.

Michele Moe:

I would say they're very important. I would love to hear what others think after I say why it's important. But first of all, setting up your environment. If you don't, if you if you have weight, you want to lose, and you've tried everything and you haven't had the success you want. It might be time to change your environment. What I mean by that is change, you might have to change who you hang around with. And let's go back to the social things you asked me about. You may have to say no to girls brunch, every Sunday, or whatever that looks like for you. Maybe that can't work for a time. And I guess I think of clients that had in the past where maybe they go to their parents house every week. First of all, for a dinner, Sunday dinner, their parents aren't on board with their weight loss. So they don't make foods that they can eat. Well, hang on, sorry, something just popped up on the screen.

Michele Clark:

Oh, that was mean.

Michele Moe:

I couldn't see anything for a second.

Michele Clark:

The dog barking.

Michele Moe:

So what what that looks like is sometimes you may just have to say to your friends, family. Look, this is something I'm doing for me and for my health. And this is important to me right now. So I need you to support me, I need you to be on board when I have to say no to the extra drink. Or when I can't go out to have wine night with you. Or when I can't go out to eat three days a week, I can only go out one day a week, that goes for your spouse too. So it's kind of I liken it to somebody who let's say somebody has alcohol issue in their past and they're trying to overcome that, let's say they're sober now, they can't go hang out at bars, that's just not a good place for them to go. Say when it comes to your weight loss in your food, you have to surround yourself with a positive environment, and people that will support you. And you have to set yourself up for success with your with with the food you buy the food you prep and plan and where you hang out and what you choose to do. Now that might just be for a short time during say a weight loss or fat loss phase. And those things may or may come back in the mix. I always like to say that up front and say, Okay, this might just be for a short time where you have to say no to some things, let's get in the diet and get out as fast as we can. So that time is not prolonged. Once we're done, we can add those back in. But that's kind of what I mean by set yourself up for success. It's, it's going to be really hard if you have a spouse who's not on board, that's the biggest one is let's make sure your spouse is on board with this or whoever you live with. Because if you're the one cooking food, it can be done. I have clients who they're in charge of they have to cook food for their spouse, their kids, their grandkids, whoever else lives with them, but yet they can still stay on track. So it goes back to the first thing you asked Elaine about mindset is you have to make that mindset shift. I'm gonna do this for me. This is important for me right now for my health.

Philip Pape:

Yeah, no, absolutely. And I want to make a distinction with people between restricting or abstaining from what were you talked about, which is understanding your own personal triggers, or your own personal things that tempt you or whatever the phrase you want to use, and just taking control in advance and being proactive with your environment. It's not saying no, I can't do this. No, I can't that do that. It's just making the giving you a easier path to avoiding those things, and setting guidelines for yourself. So I'm sure sure we can all agree with that. So thanks Moe these are these are awesome tips. And I like that you talked about people as well as part of your environment, because that is super important. Yeah, go ahead and

Michele Clark:

quickly add something to what Michele to Michele's point, I find that he also depends on where people are on in their journey, right. Because usually beginners, it's really, really difficult. So I personally try to focus more like trying to teach them on how to mitigate the damage. Does that make sense? Like so it's not, you know, even if they, they drink they eat more than they should at least I try to focus on like, Okay, here's what you can do, too. So it's not too too bad, right? So you don't you don't get off your plan so miserably that you're gonna feel like shit afterwards. Right? But I find that with people they're a little more advanced. I feel that that comes with time, right? You don't need to like it's easier. Because they they know what to do. They're a little bit better about about being more selective, right? I think you guys would agree I have, I actually have this, this dis two people that I talked to yesterday, my coaches and one of the girls, she's like, way more advanced, you know, she she has seen some amazing results. And so when we're talking about the holidays, she was like, Yeah, you know, it was a little challenging. And isn't that I had some moments where, you know, I ate more dessert or I skipped meals, whatever. But it was far less than someone else that I had. It's a beginner, right, they struggled a lot more. So yeah, I think it's like, for me, I find it's very, it depends really on where each person is. You have to kind of

Philip Pape:

meet them where they're at.

Michele Moe:

I think you're right, Michelle, I think some people are when might look like having pizza one night, but just having one slice, right? People might look like the wind is no pizza at all. It depends on people, relatives. Yeah, absolutely. And it depends on that journey. You're right, how far along? Are they? What are those things? Some people can have a little bit of a cheat meal and not go overboard? Some can have any without going off the rails? Absolutely. Exactly.

Philip Pape:

So switching topics again, I know we have, I don't know if anybody has a hard stop in seven minutes. We can always go a little past but let me know in the chat, but we're gonna move back to Aaron. So Aaron, the ultra stuff, preparing for an ultra whatnot? Should do people need to have all their other ducks in a row here that we've been talking about before they do to Ultra? Or can they kind of start slow, you know, take baby steps and work toward it, maybe with some sort of smaller race. And then and then use your process, whatever it is like your your fueling and training process.

Aaron Cartridge:

I think that's typically Yeah, that's typically what most people would do. They dip their toe in, do a, you know, few 10k races. And then they sit down with coffee with a few other like minded people and somebody actually my journey into an ultra I was doing a Spartan Race, I was in a 7k Spartan Race with with my wife and a friend. And I just had these two guys talking about doing the Ultra. Ooh, and Ultra. That sounds cool. What's that? And that was my inspiration or moment to decide to become an ultra runner. But yeah, for sure, it's definitely something that you would build up to.

Philip Pape:

Alright, so we're back on the show, we had to edit a little bit of it out. Aaron was talking about Ultra races, I think we lost one of our coaches due to a network issue. Because you know, Scotland internet, maybe not as reliable. We'll see if he comes back. And Aaron, you were talking about working your way up to an ultra? You know, what, like, what would be the first race? So a guy like me? Well, I'm a little bit a little bit fit, but somebody who's maybe not even into fitness at all, versus somebody who's fit? Where would they start? Yeah, so

Aaron Cartridge:

typically, where you would start is you would pick the race. If you wanted to be an ultra typically, it's a 50k. To start with don't order. I'm not sorry, I'm not sure what that is in miles. I've been in Australia too long.

Philip Pape:

It's long, but

Aaron Cartridge:

it's, yeah, it's long. Yeah. So typically, if today is your first Ultra, so if you were to have that on your radar, you would pick the race. And typically I'd say don't travel too far. If you've got one local, pick that one, and then have a depending on your start point, have a good amount of time, up to that race. And then you know, do a couple of races in between. So do a half marathon, build your training plan around it, but definitely have at least a half marathon, maybe a marathon like an easier marathon in between. So that you can experience that race situation and all the nerves and all the planning and and really get a good idea of, of everything that goes into it. And then you'll learn so much every time you learn about yourself a nutrition plan or a training plan. Every time you do.

Philip Pape:

Yeah. And that's a good point, right? Just committing to it kind of like Michelle talks about just taking the first step and that's it, you know, a decent step for somebody to go, Okay, I'm gonna sign up for a you said 50k, which it looks like 31 mile run, which is a little bit more than a marathon. But at least you now are forced to figure all this stuff out. Where so that they get a little bit of a leg ahead. What about the fueling strategy, you know, for food, because to me, that would be the biggest area of uncertainty is how do I prepare, maybe in the weeks days leading up and then the event itself? Just very basics, what what should people consider?

Aaron Cartridge:

Yeah, absolutely. And it's often overlooked, I think a lot of people. There's a bit of a distinction between overtraining and under fueling for all ultra runners, even seasoned runners make the mistakes they take quite often they won't be eating enough. But in those specifically in those days leading up to the day, you you're already consuming, you should already be consuming a high amount of carbohydrates, protein to support. And obviously, you're not fat just to, you know, manage the calorie So all's

Philip Pape:

carbs maybe shouldn't be you shouldn't be losing weight leading up to it

Aaron Cartridge:

shouldn't be losing weight, yes, it definitely should be maintaining the enough not to be losing weight. And if you change that, you see changes in people's faces all the time, and often towards doing these longer distances. And it's, it's definitely affecting the performance. But there is an element of carb loading. But what most people do before a race is they'll have a, like a cool off period, still no taper. So the actual output is dropping anyway. So that calorie means maintain maintenance is yeah, quite often enough. So but most people are people 24 hours before the race or have a very high carb meal. Let's be the go with Pastor, whatever you used to, in my opinion,

Philip Pape:

awesome, Michelle. So we're gonna go slightly past our own a lot of time the people listening love it, they love these epic, hour and a half to three hours, we'll just go three hours now, it won't be much longer. I'm going to hit off Michelle and JC with one more question each. And then we'll wrap it up. So Michelle, we talked about the big the small wins and talks about the like doing something is better than doing nothing. The last thing I wanted to ask you about is part of your mission is to help women peacefully achieve and sustain their fitness goals. So in today's, as we know, from JC stressful world, how do you get centered and find that peace?

Michele Clark:

I think knowledge, I think knowledge is freedom, right? So I really try to focus on teaching my clients. Guess what I'm trying to say is I try to help them understand what they're doing and why they're doing it. So I'm very big on, on sharing knowledge with the race. So here's why you should start your day with protein. You know, here's why you have to move more, here's why you need to prioritize sleep, because I think that it's not even I think this is what I've been seeing working with people, right? They become more compliant, once they understand what they're doing. So and that, to me is you know, in some ways, this will because it's, you know, you know, what you're doing and wants to learn you also were able to, to draw your own strategy. Right to, again, to Michele's point. I'm very big on like, Okay, you understand why you know why and why and why you're doing that. So like, if you're going to say Brazil as you guys probably no, we're be gone on what we call Churrasco which is like a barbecue so it's like red meat where we grill red meat so we have this thing where the knee goes around so I would assume that you guys are familiar with what I'm talking about right now. So that's very common in Brazil for for you know, for people friends families to get together and just grill some meat they will they'll eat meat and have the you know the will though they'll gather to eat it's very very easy to overeat when you do that right because what they do the grill meat and they go around right they'll put the meat the cut up meat that looks extremely delicious on like, like cutting board like a nice wood cutting board and they go around serving people in they love it, you know, like usually someone that's very good at grilling will be doing and they go around with the meat. So what I tell the folks that I work with is make her plate again Michele has touched on that you know make a plate get the amount of meat today you know that you're gonna eat that you need, right that's gonna satisfy you you don't need to eat your face off. You know get your little portion of salad your little whatever rice whatever they have potato salad, you know, make your plate eater plate because that will be enough to keep you full that will be enough, right so and then helping them understand why they shouldn't be you know, peeking on food constantly like munching away is what I find help them to to Um, be compliant. And that to me is peaceful I, when I say peacefully helping them, I mean, I teach them so they understand and they they're able to make their own choices. You know,

Philip Pape:

I love that. Yeah. Because the the ignorance leads to stress uncertainty, and all the other things that are not peaceful but as you said, the awareness and knowledge really opens up that door and liberates you. So I love that. So thank you,

Michele Clark:

Michelle. Yeah, I was just going to say we underestimate the amount of calories and while we do have a little bite of something, and you think, Okay, this is nothing this is this is not going to hurt me. But then, you know, 30 days, back in whatever do the photos after 30 days, and they're super frustrated. They don't understand what happened. I did everything right. Did you?

Philip Pape:

Yeah, that's what it is. And their coach can can question them on it. So that's the thing. I think I think the studies show like we underestimate by 50%. And that even professionals, dieticians, nutrition coaches, nutritionists. Even they underestimate by 20 to 30. So it's crazy. All right, so JC Well, let's go to the last thing here, I just want to let you tell us, like one or two things on your mind that maybe you've been learning lately, or we should know, maybe something accessible to people. And I say it that way. Because, again, cold showers, I don't know that everybody would want to jump into that right away. Great thing to do is, you know, something that you've been learning that you think is can make an impact on people that is somewhat accessible in your space?

JC:

Well, I'm always learning, always learning different things, chopping into one gene. And then you go online, and you hear one thing and all that. But just now, I mean, you know, in our course, you talk about macros, and we'll be talking about stress. And we talk about sleep. And we've got all these different factors, working out muscle mass stretching, etc. And I think you can do all those things. But there's also external things out with the people don't even think of so I kind of like to look at things a bit different. And just now, my main focus just now I've been I've started a book by Dr. Mercola. It's called EMF. And there's another guy I follow Ben Greenfield, he's in his biohacking. And he talks a lot about EMFs. And you probably hear about me on the on the group chat talking about EMFs. And a lot of people don't know about EMF and so your your, your electric electric fields around you, you know, whether it be your your Wi Fi, or whether it be your Tailee and, and whether it be it's crazy, you know, dirty electricity. So you could be next light fitting and not even realize you're soaking up these these EMFs. And I suppose people were wondering, well, what's what's why is that relative to health, but that causes a lot of inflammation. And depending on what your body can only process a certain amount. And for years and years and years, it was okay people we could we could absorb it, we could get rid of it. And it was fine. Because a lot of free radicals as well, which can cause anxiety and cause fatigue, low libido. And we you know, as coaches, we can work through all the different processes that we know. But there's this other things that could and you might think, what's wrong with them? You know, so this has been my focus lately anyway. EMF circuit myself and EMF meter, because that's one thing seen videos, reading books, but sometimes you really need to know it for yourself. So yeah, I've been going around the house and trying to figure out what's good and what's bad. So I've rewired my house and what's called Cat six cable for it eventually to have no Wi Fi and going old school, you know, and they say even my kids have a big tail on the wall when they're doing the next Xbox. They're jumping about doing the Kinect. And I'm like God, Kelly from the tail, you are getting fried.

Philip Pape:

I can't imagine what the microwave puts out.

JC:

I mean, this horrendous behavior. Now we're playing with these 5g Towers, and we've got, you know, smart meters and all these things. So it is something that I mean, everyone should look at and the stuff that I've been reading up. I mean, if you think back to I don't know, if it was the 40s or whenever, when when doctors were on adverts going, Yes, smoking is good for you. Yes. You know, I think I think this is going to be the new smoking, you know,

Philip Pape:

yeah, I'm always worried about keeping my cell phone in my pocket, you know what I mean? So, you know,

JC:

it was actually there's actually something about that. So you used to be on Apple used to be on Apple, and it would actually tell you that you actually not supposed to have your cell phone within six inches of your body at any one time. But now they've made it really hard for you to find out but that's the truth you shouldn't have and what that does is it causes dark spots in your muscles and stuff and actually can stop you from having kids as well it can destroy fertility.

Michele Clark:

Say that I never paid attention to that. But since I found out I'm pregnant, I am so careful to not have my phone near my belly and that happened and she like by instinct, you know, I didn't read anything about it. But I used to lay in bed sometimes and I and like I would listen to like, like, whatever like a TED talk a listen to, you know, Wits. & Weights, whatever. And I'll have my belly. Did you talk well Yeah, and I'll have my I used to have my phone like resting on my legs on my belly. And now I'm like, I don't do it anymore, you know? Yeah.

JC:

Well, there's another interesting thing for you, Michelle, there's actually been a direct link with, you know how autism is on the incline, you know, used to be like, when I was a kid, there was maybe one kid in your school had autism. And now, you know, there's probably three in each class. But there's a direct link between EMF exposure and autism.

Philip Pape:

So, I mean, this has been like a whirlwind conversation with a lot of different topics that we covered, hopefully, the listener, even though it wasn't, you know, one entire topic got some great value out of it, that people listening, you know, resonated with them, everybody had their own thing, something may have been more relevant to somebody and others, and we covered a lot. So everybody here is obviously dedicated to helping people transform their lives, that is clear. And you know, because we don't want listeners to miss out on connecting with each of you. I want to go around and find out where people can learn about you or, and or your work. So I just want to start with Elaine, where can people find you?

Elaine Tarbell:

The best place is to reach out through Facebook and look at tarballs barbells and Oskaloosa, Iowa, and you can just send us a message there and reach out whether you're looking for a training in person or a nutritional needs a good place to go. Cool.

Philip Pape:

So Facebook, TarbellsBarbells, you could search it, or you could just type facebook.com/TarbellsBarbells. And you'll get there. Shell mo where can people find you?

Michele Moe:

i The best place to find me is on my website most stronger.com I'm on Instagram at most stronger. If they go on my Facebook, I'm sorry, on my website, they can contact me and I'd be happy to get on a call with anybody to talk about their goals and their needs and see if it's a good fit.

Philip Pape:

Cool. There we go. So moestronger.com. And I think it's a big pink button book constant consultation, right on the homepage for a free call. Encourage you to do that. And next up we have Aaron Aaron, you're giving something away, right?

Aaron Cartridge:

Yeah, so people can find me. Well, I have a free guide to training for your first altra and you can send me an inquiry either find me on Facebook is and cartridge or through PT distinction.com Kairos nutrition AU. All one word is my is my platform right there.

Philip Pape:

Awesome. Yep, PT distinction.com says Kairos nutrition au get your train for your first Ultra guide. It's epic. It'll get you started and then Erin can help you with the details beyond that. Michelle Clark, where can people reach you?

Michele Clark:

Instagram so that'd be the easiest way I'm there more than I like to admit

Philip Pape:

whether we like it or not.

Michele Clark:

So I will definitely see it so my Instagram is me for Mitch short for Michelle and my notary for nutrition so when you try I underline Michelle there we

Philip Pape:

go at me Nutri underscore Michelle with one L. And again, all this is gonna be in the show notes. Don't worry for people listening. Thank you, Michelle. People definitely reach out to you on Insta and then JC do we want to share anything at this point or you're in

JC:

a ghost waiting? I'll say something that they'll say something that probably an Instagram as well set up a profile. Yeah. So I'll let you know Phillip and you can maybe put it with the podcast or something. Oh, we

Philip Pape:

will. We will because these these tend to come out like a couple months later. So all good. We'll have time. All right. So I'm going to include everybody's background, every coach's background and contact info in the show notes. So you the listener, the viewer can reach out to them, especially if any one person really resonates with you and your goals. Everyone here can help in some way. You know, not just one on one coaching but just have a conversation, ask a question, go to their Facebook group, watch their stuff, whatever it is, you're gonna learn a ton. Thanks to my fellow coaches and friends for joining me today. Thanks to the viewers and listening listeners for hanging out with us and as always, stay strong. Thanks for listening to the show. Before you go, I have a quick favorite ask. If you enjoy the podcast, let me know by leaving a five star review in Apple podcasts and telling others about the show. Thanks again for joining me Philip Pape in this episode of Wits & Weights. I'll see you next time and stay strong.

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