Get Enlifted

Coaches Roundtable #35: Out of Money, Out of Time, Out of Talent... & All Times We Kept Going with Kimberly, Dave, and Chase

September 27, 2023 Kimberly Kesting, Dave Robinson, Chase Tolleson Season 2
Get Enlifted
Coaches Roundtable #35: Out of Money, Out of Time, Out of Talent... & All Times We Kept Going with Kimberly, Dave, and Chase
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

All excuses and stuck stories of coaches getting in the way of their goals, success, and ability to thrive usually come down to one of these three things... you're out of money, you're out of time, or you're out of talent.

"I don't have the time to _____."
"I don't know how to ______."
"I don't have the money to ______."

We're breaking down these stories from points in our own coaching careers and how we were able to move through it and keep going.

The Enlifted super secret formula to success: "Start, and keep going."

Get more from Enlifted Coaches:
The Enlifted Experience - Live In-Person Event in Richmond, VA | Oct 6-8th
http://enlifted.me / @enliftedcoaches

Kimberly: @kimberly.kesting
Chase: @coach_chase_tolleson // www.chasetolleson.com
Dave: @daverobinson.coach // www.workyourstories.com

Speaker 1:

Get control of your words, get control of your story, get control of your breath, get over your fear of not being good enough, get your dream clients, get them results and get in lifted. Welcome to today's episode of Get in Lifted. We're having technical difficulties to start and my duty is as a barista call so Dave Chase. Today we're going to talk about all the times in our coaching career where we start and kept going. I'm going to have you guys kick it off, do the small talk as you choose. I'm going to make Dave's latte and then we're going to get rolling, so enjoy.

Speaker 3:

Thank you so much. We're going to put a latte to the end and I just I don't know whether we I could do that. So, chase, what's up? How are you doing, buddy?

Speaker 2:

Absolutely fantastic. I've rocking that dad life today I bet 430. Got the workout done, got breakfast done, dishes done, dishwasher emptied, Got Sarah out the door for work, had a client call and now we're here. Legend dude.

Speaker 3:

Just the dad legend over there.

Speaker 2:

Dude, how are you doing, how are you feeling? You picked up a little, yeah, a little something.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I put out last week, bro, I put out at Captain Taylor's immersion. We missed you. I missed you greatly. We had 11 or 12 guys and, yeah, it was heavy and deep out the gate. I also added two 10 mile runs a day or two days apart with chief jungle. So that, you know, certainly was, yeah, it was part of the equation. But I started to pick up a little something, something about 30 minutes into ancestor work on the last day, on Saturday. Everybody left on Sunday, so we had a three and a half hour ancestor session that just blew the doors off of you know, everybody. And, yeah, when people, when things started coming up and out, I started my eyes started leaking and I started dripping in the nose and having expectant stuff come up and out, you know. So it was, it's magical stuff, man, it's magical stuff.

Speaker 2:

It's I've said it time and time again that this stuff is some of the most practical as in you can practice it stuff that we can find out there, and it's also some of the heaviest magic I've played with.

Speaker 3:

Yeah man, the biggest takeaway from the ancestor session we had the youngest person there was 23. The oldest was 63. We had multiple, you know, races and ethnic ethnicities and my biggest takeaway is to say this, negated first, we are not so dissimilar after all, aka, we are incredibly similar backgrounds, stories, traumas, things that we've experienced, things our parents have experienced, things our parents parents have experienced, and how that shapes us as human beings. So it was eye-opening for that, for that, just like all this work is, and it was a beautiful, beautiful thing to see men be vulnerable and open and share their deepest wounds, you know, which often stem from past and parents and whatnot Talk about men and parents.

Speaker 2:

I'll drop this one because I know there's a lot of coaches in the community that listen. I've had a few clients since the first time I pinged this one that you know I'm not living this story anymore, I'm not dealing with this pain anymore, and numerous times you take off the tee and this I'm not carrying his story anymore, I'm not carrying his pain anymore. Then we can flip it to the affirmative and release it, and the amount of times that I've seen I just put the cursor on that tee and hit backspace Like oh shit, Just it breaks it wide open, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.

Speaker 3:

Top quality y'all. I also have an announcement.

Speaker 1:

Oh.

Speaker 3:

I am three official sessions away from 1000. Congratulations.

Speaker 1:

That's a big freaking deal.

Speaker 3:

Thank you 997 sessions. If everything goes well today and nobody reschedules by tonight at 9 pm, I will have hit my thousandth.

Speaker 1:

What are we doing to?

Speaker 3:

celebrate? I don't know, I don't know.

Speaker 1:

I know what we're doing to celebrate.

Speaker 3:

Jalati Celeste.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah.

Speaker 3:

Duh Okay yeah totally.

Speaker 1:

I was going to say that we'll celebrate at the Unlifted Experience.

Speaker 2:

Hell yeah, I was going to say like scoot the loop.

Speaker 3:

Scoot the loop, scoot to the loop, fly out to Austin just for a night.

Speaker 1:

So the scoot's here.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, we can find a loop.

Speaker 1:

So listen, okay, just so everybody knows, dave now has a salty Kimberly latte, which is also known as the Dave.

Speaker 3:

Respect.

Speaker 1:

And so I tested the scooters. Last week I was coming home from the VMFA after yoga class and I was like, really not wanting to walk, and I was like, you know what, let's scoot. So I go over and I find the scooters and I'm like, oh wow, these are really nice. Honestly, some of the best scooters I've written.

Speaker 2:

I swear there's now, did you try and jump them off any curves? Because like can they take that?

Speaker 1:

So I didn't, but Crystal did and luckily she didn't go down, but the scooter definitely went down. Oh boy, take this as a word of caution If you're coming to Unlifted Experience and you want to use scoots as your way to get around town. Richmond was literally built in the late 1800s and the roads reflect that. So if you, if you want to scoot, scoot and be careful yeah, my first time scootering here I launched myself over the handlebars, landed in a bare plank, I was like thank God for my core strength and my stability, because me and this cute little romper came and walked away unscathed. Man, yeah, monument Avenue, beware.

Speaker 3:

So anyway. So we're talking about Monument cobblestone too.

Speaker 1:

Exactly we want to avoid cobblestones at all stories, or you just pick the track right, Because what Chase and I were talking about was that it's just like a new adventure. It's like Mario Kart. When you go pick the track like Austin might have been like Rainbow Road, but Richmond is like. I don't remember any of the tracks, but one that's much more challenging, Totally.

Speaker 2:

Is there one more challenging than Rainbow Road? I thought Rainbow Road was like the track.

Speaker 1:

Rainbow Road is challenging, yeah, but well, aren't there tracks where they're out in like the rocks? Yeah, yeah, that would be more.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, and if you're Richmond's pretty riotable, it's just, and we're relatively I would say relatively cordial to bikers, and you know yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, there's a lot of bikers here. Yeah yeah, richmond is a bike city for sure Relatively cordial. Yeah, a bike gang rolled up on me the other night when I was at Stella's having dinner. Not rolled up on me, like it's.

Speaker 3:

What night of the week was it?

Speaker 1:

Wednesday.

Speaker 3:

Oh yeah, that's a broad story. I was wondering.

Speaker 1:

I was like I think this is the group that Dave talks about, that smokes joints and hides snacks and then goes on. I was like they look like a time that's Tuesday.

Speaker 3:

Tuesday night rides is the bike bums ride, you know. But yeah, there's lots of fun bike gangs, you know friendly bike gangs around town. Well, you know anyway.

Speaker 1:

Well, I'm glad that we had this little catch up set like the pre-show.

Speaker 3:

It's the pre-show to the show.

Speaker 1:

Pre-show to the pre-show we're going to get to do this in person in about less than about like two and a half weeks, sick.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

So the theme of today's episode I'll give you guys the technical intro here is so you've heard us say this before start, keep going, decide, thug it out.

Speaker 1:

There's this conversation of that using the enlisted method and just general like duh for how to succeed at something is to put in your reps and to start and stay committed to it and keep going. And I was listening to a podcast yesterday about two women in the coaching space that were talking about playing the long game. And what's interesting to me is that the coaching industry is still relatively new in the way that we know it now and people who have been in the game for four or five years are, like considered like long gamers, which is some chemical to me. But also I thought about it and I was like, well, actually, like Dave, chasing myself, like we've been in this longer than that, so if that's what they're classifying as like being it for the long game, they're talking about building no, like in trust with your audience. They're talking about adding a lot of value, all of those things. But when I thought about it I was like, well, I've been coaching for seven years, dave. How long have you been coaching for?

Speaker 3:

Full time since 2017. And well before that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and then Chase how about for you, like over a decade, right?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so full time. Full time since I got out of the Navy in 2014. And I mean I was a certified personal trainer in 2008. And I was an assistant command fitness leader in the Navy so 15 years.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so the thought that I had was like and I know that I've come up against this a handful of times is that like this conversation of like coaching can seem really appealing to people now that see it as like this Instagram lifestyle where all I have to do is post and be me and I?

Speaker 2:

get paid. I just had this conversation on my show yesterday. Lol, dude.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, but I thought about this and I was thinking like from a context of the start and keep going conversation, which is to say, to be in it for the long game. And this ties in with a conversation I was having with my brother when I was up in New York, which you know, he's a hedge fund guy, something like that yeah, sorry.

Speaker 1:

I love him. Love him Very smart, very charismatic. He's me in a boy form and so, like you know, we're talking about it. And he said something along the lines of, like he was talking about the difference between a trade and a career. And he said he's like, well, it's not, like that's really a career, like that's just a trade. And I was like, oh, interesting, interesting, worse of use of the word, and it wasn't in relation to me or it was just a conversation and I thought to myself, I was like well, I often refer to myself, I talk about my coaching career, I refer to coaching as my career, I refer to this as what I do professionally, I'm a professional coach.

Speaker 1:

And I thought about this where I was like huh, this is an interesting conversation in that, like, people are new to the space. You have to define what a career looks like for yourself. You have to define what a coach is for yourself, because this is can be the wild west. And then there's really points in time where it would be easy to think that this glorified. You know the Instagram likes, and all of a sudden, a million show up in your bank account, for you know, posting about raw milk. But the thing is is like that's not how it works at all, and I know that over my journey of building my coaching career because I do believe it's a career, it's something I'm committed to doing for the long foreseeable future that even in my first seven years of doing it there have been so many points in time where I would have could have folded, wanted to fold, ran out of money, ran out of ideas, ran out of skills, like all of those places along. Dave's eyes just got big and he's shaking his head.

Speaker 2:

There have been times where I have scrolled, indeed, looking for other jobs.

Speaker 1:

Oh, my God, you used what you say.

Speaker 2:

There have been times where I've scrolled, indeed, looking for other jobs I would.

Speaker 3:

I've never done it. I can't go back. I won't do it, no matter what happens. I can't go back and I'm all negations Totally fair. It's just, I will make zero dollars for years until before I would go back.

Speaker 1:

I figured you would say that, and I figured that Chase would also say something like that, and I definitely agree.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, oh yeah. Like I've scrolled and I've looked and I'm like, oh, fuck that. Like pardon my French and no, I'm bad. Then I get back and get back in the business.

Speaker 3:

It always seems.

Speaker 2:

And then, like you know, three days later a client pays in full and you're like oh, it's the best job ever, and then the next week you have no inquiries. Oh man, maybe I should go bartend.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, okay. So let's address that first. Is like the volatility of this? Like the choices like, basically like it's like you eat what you kill, and which is true. You literally like the clients you sign up are people that you, like you've had to work to bring them into your sphere right, bring them into your, into your I don't know as like your network, like help, nurture them, help them.

Speaker 2:

Ecosystem Ecosystem.

Speaker 1:

That's a great word and then prove that you have value and show them how you're going to provide that value and then get them through some of their own objections and limiting beliefs that are keeping them stuck, which is why they need to work with you in the first place and then make an investment with you.

Speaker 3:

It's, it's you're doing sales, marketing, advertising, fulfillment, logistics, the back end, the front end, design, the whole nine yards right, but well, content creation. I've never in my life received a W2. Never actually got a paycheck. It's always been eat what you kill, which now I don't love that phrase.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I don't like that phrase either, but I because it seems upthrowed and it seems you know you verse me and like we got one thing here and you know I'm going to kill it. So you're going to be like. It just seems very. You know what I do. Like is you eat what you grow?

Speaker 1:

Oh, hell yeah.

Speaker 3:

Of course you yes, you eat what you grow, and that makes a lot more sense when it comes to this work that we're in, because it is very relationship based and it's not very sales basis that were rather it's not transactional. Let's, let's put it that yeah.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, it is more relationship based, it's more long term base. And you know, going on a hunt and getting a shot and there's food, like that's, you know that's more like selling a book in my mind, or you know, selling a course or something like that, where it's a one time thing and then you're done Right. I like the long term nurturing part of being a coach and the relationship building aspect of being a coach and I think that that sets it apart from a lot of other industries and careers and vocations and trades and things of that nature.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I agree, it's a very. It's a two-way street. I have to want to work with you just as much as you want to work with me.

Speaker 2:

For me to enjoy it.

Speaker 1:

It's not yet that it is not transactional in that way.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, want it, you can't afford it.

Speaker 2:

And on the eat what you grow. You know to take it in another direction, as I tend to do what I grow feeds everyone, mm-hmm yeah. And you know, when we were on with our buddy Mike Gonzalez, when he did a workshop for the lifting community and there were somebody sat in the chat like if you don't serve, you don't sell, it's like when I sell, I serve, I serve because I sell. And I was like, well, when I serve, I sell.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Serve first and that's been big for me in the last year, year plus Like I'll give it all away for free. You all want the relationship, you want the accountability, you want my time and the action to implement it quickly, then that's. That's where we talk about a coach relationship.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I'm glad you brought up Mike. He's going to be presenting at the Unlifted Experience too, and we've got something that I'm very excited about that we're going to be sharing with everyone there. And the main thing that happens ultimately when that coaches that get stuck in their business, it's usually the story about the sales, the marketing, the design. I don't have time to do this, I don't know how to do this, and so, like what I think is an interesting conversation is if we just like roll back and we play over stories in our own minds, like I mean, I can tell you guys the first time I built my website and how much I hated it. I did it anyway. I could tell you.

Speaker 1:

I have it going back to rebuild I can tell you how many, how, what it was like to design a logo. I can tell you, like the stuff that, like I started and I did and then at some point in time was like, oh, this isn't good enough. Or oh this like well, shit, nobody's even going here. Because like things you just don't understand at the time is like what I'm getting at. Like there's a combination of. I think what I said in the beginning was like you run out of talent, which is like I don't know how to do this anymore. You run out of time because, like you just have maxed yourself out. Or you run out of money, and which is like I'm not making any sales and I'm out of money. Like I could. I could give you many. I could give you like three stories from each of those three.

Speaker 2:

So I can say the running out of time is real, and that's a lot of coaches, and myself included, you know it's like, okay, cool, I have time to grow my business. Well, okay, now my business grew. Now to keep it growing, I still get to donate or delegate, schedule that much time to grow the business, and also I have these new clients to serve. So now my business is taking more of my time and requires more of it, and that's something to be cognizant of on the front of front end of the journey.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, okay, let's use I like this bucket of talent, time and money and let's go through much like we did when we did that episode where I just like asked us all questions and go around and share. And let's share experiences from our own careers and like when we hit those edges and what we did and like how it happened. So we'll start with talent time when you ran out of talent. I don't know what to do in this case. I'm not skilled enough. I don't have enough information.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I mean, you know, I'd still be personal training or slinging healthy holistic habits if I didn't get introduced to story work, you know, and this, this skill set, allows me to work in a manner that is way more effective and way more impactful, in my opinion, than anything that I was doing before, even though fitness and health are super duper important, how did you realize that you, like when you were coaching in health and fitness?

Speaker 1:

how did you realize, like I need something additional, like in the moment where you're like I'm out of talent, like I can't help these people as much as I want to?

Speaker 3:

I mean, there were, you know, the. Some people are coachable, some people take your advice and run with it, some people actually implement the program, some people, you know, et cetera, and then others don't, and it was the ones that didn't that I couldn't figure out how or why. You know, maybe out of the 30% who didn't get the results or didn't, you know, follow through. I didn't have any other tools to examine other than you know. I knew Simon Sinek's ask why, you know why, a bunch of times, you know, and I worked on my set and I was like, you know, super duper, fucking positive and you know, yada, yada, but I didn't actually be.

Speaker 3:

I wasn't able to actually get into the core root of the, the many issues, and I found myself very often I know we've talked about this on this platform before, but very often being like the one that my clients talked to about their impending divorce, or the one where he's like, hey, you know, you can't tell anybody about this, all right, but like I'm about to sell the company. Or like, hey, we're about to go under 150, people are going to do research ops, but don't tell anybody. God, you know, like, what am I supposed to do with any of this stuff. You know I didn't have the skill set to handle it.

Speaker 1:

So yeah, and what it? When you came up against those scenarios. It's very similar to scenario which Kailin just described yesterday on level one, she was playing a language game and that ultimately happened. And it was like it was this moment to me where I realized I was like in most of the group in that class is fitness coaches, and I was like. You have all had this experience. Every single one of you has had. You ask one question and all of a sudden your client unloads the biggest life secret onto what's going on, and so when that was, happening before.

Speaker 1:

You knew a different way and had more talent. We'll call it. What did you think that meant about you as a coach?

Speaker 3:

I mean, I took it as a compliment. You know this person likes me, they trust me, they know me enough that like I'm not going to go and spill their beans to anybody else. You know. I learned later that you know, for one woman in particular, like our sessions every Tuesday, thursday were like the only times she left her home and like left her house and because she was dealing with so much stuff mentally and I wish that I had known that more at the time and have more tools at the time to be able to more positively impact.

Speaker 1:

Did you take it in any ways like that you weren't good enough, or was it more of like you just kind of like recognize or like I need more skills?

Speaker 3:

I think it's kind of in the middle. You know, part of me was like why can't I help this person? You? Know, why am I not like? You know, why do we keep coming here and having the same conversations like months on end? And you know every other session ends in tears? You know like I'm like. What am I doing?

Speaker 2:

wrong.

Speaker 3:

But, you know, at the same time I think a lot of it was. You know, I was proud of myself for how I was showing up and what I was doing, you know, but it was draining on me because I was empathizing and sympathizing and not I didn't have the skill set to allow the stories to hit and roll which now I'm super good at, unless it's in the ancestors, and that's why I'm sick.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah, I was overhearing like the slightest bit of it when I was making your coffee and I was like Tim have to listen to this. Yeah, exactly, okay, chase, tell us about a time you ran out of talent.

Speaker 2:

So definitely similar to Dave, except I only noticed it after I got into level one. You know, during the COVID shelter in place, we made an online course for our members at the gym and I went through a core language upgrade in 2017 and went back through it three or four times and then created a module on perception and use law language stuff in there, and then created a module on gratitude and it was still. There were pieces that just weren't quite sticking for some people. And then we had Mark on my gym's podcast and then I asked him at the end because he had yet to like really start pushing it. Lifted and advertising and lifted on podcasts.

Speaker 2:

So hey, man, what's this and lifted thing you're involved in too. It's like actually, let's you and my job on a call and the words he used was this will be a samurai sword for what you're looking to do with mindset in the gym. And it was, and more so like business wise times. I ran out, ran. Our talent were marketing and sales and advertising. I was a hell of a good coach and trainer in my gym and I didn't know jack shit about networking, about getting my business out there, about getting the message that my clients want to hear about. Communicating with my clients in a way that would help them open up and trust the business to sign up, and that's what the bulk of my education up until I went through and lifted was business marketing and sales paying coaches for that because I was just to take out the just. I was a really knowledgeable fitness trainer who decided he was going to open a gym and got slapped in the face with a lesson that he also got to learn how to run a business.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, something about that world-class coach and shitty business owner. Yeah. I'm coming back up, dude, I'm up to average. Now I feel like I'm gone from extremely poor to like kind of okay and it's all the way up. We're moving all the way up.

Speaker 2:

I'm cruising on that and every time I often when I talk to business owners or people in the business world, whether it be coaches or other, I'm like oh wait, I actually know a decent amount about this. One of my good friends and business partners in another venture has reminded me.

Speaker 1:

Look at him. He's always been in another venture.

Speaker 3:

In another business. Come on, I'll hand you the content yeah.

Speaker 2:

Well, he's reminded me time and time again. He's like dude, you ran your gym and ran it. Well, he was there and he was a member for the last year and a half. He's like you know this stuff, so yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, my time I ran out of talent, I would say, is like very is parallel to Chase, like recognizing where and this was a point in my business pre-learning the lifted skills. So I wonder how that would have played into, how this you know how it could have gone differently. But ultimately, like where I ran out of what I'll call my talent, was like my understanding about litter, quite literally how to start and keep going. So I was running group nutrition, nutrition challenges, a group nutrition course called nutrition 101, and then once one client sessions and I got that thing cooking and it's like become very clear to me in hindsight. Like it was like I had a really good network of in person clients and like a funnel through my gyms that I worked at and then my friend network and using Instagram and all that.

Speaker 1:

Where I hit the edge of the talent was like I didn't understand how to keep that going.

Speaker 1:

So like I would start one, finish it and then be like okay, now what? And want to do something new or different rather than repeat the thing that was successful and take it out into new, new partners or take it to a new network or bring it into somebody's office or whatever it was and it was like where I saw it in hindsight was I was like, wow, that was a great product. I was fulfilling it really well. It converted super well for my one to one clients. But my newness and business and understanding that like really what makes things successful is the rinse and repeat and iterate, and iterate and iterate, stay with the exact same offering over a longer period of time to get more feedback and to get your to get more feedback and to get even better at it and to make it more expensive. And all of that. I wanted to do something new and different and I wanted to try something different or I just like couldn't, my tension couldn't hold.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, the amount of times that I shot myself in the foot with my gym where I was like, oh, we're going to switch up classes. Oh, we're going to try this programming. Oh, we're going to do this system now. Oh, actually, we're going to do this like it's a consistency pays off.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and it's like it's funny because, like I mean all of us with a background in health coaching and like primarily coaching has like it's like, it's like so dumb, it's like literally. The consistency is the most important part.

Speaker 3:

Follow the dumbest program ever, but if you do it consistently like, you'll get results. Yeah, exactly, so, yeah, that was just folks.

Speaker 1:

That was like my, my. I look at it and I'm just like wow, if I had, if I had kept going with that, like what would that have looked like? How would it have looked different? And you know it wasn't meant to keep going, so that's fine, like I'm in a different phase and different chapter. But the thing is is I look back on it and I think to myself like wow, like if I only knew.

Speaker 3:

But I mean, we look back and telling it to you guys.

Speaker 1:

So in this scenario, you can learn from us.

Speaker 3:

And everything happens for a reason and I look back at numerous instances in my in my life where I quit and I think that was something professionally like, possibly a dash too soon.

Speaker 3:

Yeah just a dash. You know, I walked out of University of Richmond weeks before they were offering me a full time assistant, strength and conditioning position. Weeks before they were like hey, man, the football coach has had into Virginia State, like and he wants you to go with them. You know, and like, and that was three weeks beforehand, like I left on, like the, you know, the first week of March and they were like April 1st we're offering Dave and so, and like, it's not really what I wanted to do. Yeah, it's not really what I wanted to do, you know. And same with the financial planning, same with you know this, that and the other. So it's the start and keep going and the things that when you know the mountain you're climbing is the mountain you want to be climbing. Like, don't fucking go.

Speaker 2:

There's a tweet that was shared. I want to drop this real quick while we're still in this. This tangent Alex we're Losey. Love him or hate him. The guy's great at business, and this was shared in a group chat with some of my business partners and how to guarantee you won't grow. Try to grow as fast as possible. And then he put a quote from Warren Buffett you can't have a baby in a month by getting nine women pregnant.

Speaker 1:

That's good. Yeah, it's like I think about this from a perspective of like, where there's two things that happen right, which is like you have to know when to walk away from the things that are no longer it, but then you also have to know when to commit to the things that are, and so much of that is that in itself is reps, so it's it's uh, I find myself now, having made a handful of key decisions like that throughout my career, even prior to coaching, of knowing I want to go for this versus that, to know for me, and having to like actually hear that and be clear about it and honor it and then speak it out because it's going to impact other people, or like how that's going to go. And the next, um, the next thing on the list was running out of time, and I would say that that can happen, like. I'll give more clarity on like how I mean that, and maybe you guys interpret it slightly differently which is like I ran out of time, to like I ran out of time in my corporate job because I was just no longer like interested in doing it, like I didn't want to do it anymore, and so I was like I don't have. I cannot give any more time to this.

Speaker 1:

I've ran out of time in the sense of, like how Chase mentioned earlier, which is that, like I had so many clients that my calendar was so full, it was really difficult for me to provide a quality service and to be able to show up and give them my best and like that seems like a good problem to have, but it's not, because then what happens up happening is like I now I'm running out of the passion, I'm running out of the juice, like I don't want to do this anymore. I become overworked and resentful of the fact that I have 15 clients sessions throughout the week and it's like God, can I just get a break, you know? And flip side of everything. So, and in the in the conversation of time too, it could be like I wanted to achieve this goal by a certain period of time and I didn't, so I ran out of time to get it done.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, those are my favorites, because I continually remind myself and continually understand there's no such thing as unrealistic goals or dreams, merely unrealistic timelines. There's also no such thing as time.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's a whole different.

Speaker 3:

I mean, you know, this is this is an example that I wanted to bring up. I've got my official storywork sessions count here in 2020. I did 185 sessions and that was what I learned about and lifted. I think I got a one certified in May or April of that year or something like that May probably and you know, in half the year knocked out 185 sessions. My 2021 goal, which I have strike through it because I did not get it.

Speaker 3:

I will coach 500 storywork sessions in 2021. 2021 total 275. So 274. So half, you know, a little more than half. And then I had my next strike through. Goal that didn't occur was I will coach my thousandth storywork session. I just messed up my camera so I can't see him. I will coach my thousandth storywork session on June 1st 2022. And in 2022, I did 317 sessions, but nowhere close to 1000.

Speaker 1:

This is great, I want to turn this into a meme.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, 100%. And you know my 2023 total is 221 as of the 18th which was yesterday of September, and now I'm at 997 sessions. So the goal that is written that I will hit is I will coach my 1000th storywork session by October 1st 2023. And so that's two years past where I thought I was going to do that. And you know, now, looking back, it's been roughly 1000 days. Three years.

Speaker 3:

It's been, you know, roughly a session a day and I started projecting for it. I was like, oh shit, it's not going to take me 30 years to get to 10,000 sessions. Like I bet I can do that. And you know I've got to get 9000 sessions and, like you know, another, you know, but starting to keep going and that's what happens is you end up getting to those things and getting those reps in and you know, then achieving a certain level of mastery and whatever you're doing, yeah, I think it speaks to the idea that, like it's, you could have easily in year one been like, ok, that was cool, not set a goal for year two and then not even track or not even know Right.

Speaker 1:

So you set a bigger goal than what you were able to achieve, but you didn't hit it. And what you and you did keep going and then you hit. You eventually hit the goal at the time, like the timeline is usually. I mean, times aren't real, it's arbitrary, it's yeah, exactly, and like. When I think and framing it that way, I think about a few different things that have happened in my career goals that I've set that did not happen on the timeline, that I anticipated in the beginning but that didn't come around years later. Or the opportunity showed up in a different packaging, but same experience of what I set the goal for. And then that goes back to being what, how I was able to say yes or no to things based on where I had already set the goal. So, like the goal isn't about necessary. The goal is like setting a target. It's not about setting the like yes, if you lift a goal, set of goals, setting pyramid targets at the top plan and identity in the corner. Where does it say timeline?

Speaker 1:

Yeah we can use a timeline to motivate us or to keep us on track, but no, I mean target is just where am I going? What am I doing with this?

Speaker 3:

You achieve that in which you set your heart and mind and actions and desire on you know, and, and, yeah, like, the homestead is fucking coming.

Speaker 3:

I guarantee it, it's wild, it's wild you know but the mountain one's coming and it might not be this year, next year, whatever it is, but it's, it's going to happen and so, like, just keep iterating towards that. You know. The other thing on time, wrote very briefly, is this might have been I might have achieved it sooner if I had sacrificed Time, if that makes sense, like, yeah, from my previous careers I was time poor, you know, up at six in the office by seven, Leave the office at seven, go to networking home by nine, you know, and bed by 10 up at six. And that's just like rinse, wash, repeat.

Speaker 3:

And I've been time rich during my coaching practice because I've been able to achieve a level of balance in health and wellness mental and emotional wellness that was unfathomable before and unachievable before, and so time is very important to me now, and almost as much, or more so, than money, you know, because that time is life. I replaced time with the word life, and you think about things a whole lot differently.

Speaker 1:

I was watching on Netflix this weekend. I did a total like just stay at home and do nothing weekend, and on Saturday I was watching a cheesy girl Netflix shows. And on Sunday I binge watched farmhouse restorations and building houses from the ground up in the mountains and like really cool stuff. And the show that I watched on Saturday was called Thursday's Widows or something some sort of like Spanish soap opera thing, and the guy in it was one of the main characters is like, basically, time is all you have.

Speaker 1:

Like your time is your life and your the, the viability of your life is all about how do, how you choose to spend your time, and, like you create your time. It's not time isn't a given, it's something that you create. And so when I think about being time rich in my coaching business and coaching practice apps, a fucking loopy, yes, like today I had a full day of things scheduled. I had a meeting or a podcast that was booked for this afternoon that got rescheduled and I'm like, okay, it's the end of the summer, it's almost fall, it's a gorgeous 80 degree day out here, like I could refill my calendar with stuff or I could go to the beach.

Speaker 1:

And I was like, and when I had the thought this morning, I was like you know, it became this, this conversation of like, oh, I shouldn't do that. Like I have all these things to do, I'm going, I'm traveling next week for to go to Sedona for the goddess getaway. There are lifted experiences coming up. I have all these people I need to connect with and all this stuff I need to do. And then I was like, and you know, like there's and so decision to be made, but I mean, yeah, it's likely that's where I'll have fun at the beach.

Speaker 1:

Thanks. Virginia has no waves, but I listen to me, it is. It is about the being outside almost naked in the sunshine feet in the sand, 100% mermaid swimming.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, you know. Yeah, it's all about that. You go up north Virginia Beach, right you?

Speaker 1:

go. Yeah, I like that. In the 70s, 80s, I like yeah, yeah, most people go to Virginia Beach and hang out on the board. No, hell, no, no, I'm a bougie bitch, dave, I know that.

Speaker 3:

I know that.

Speaker 1:

All right, Chase, tell us about when you ran out of time or you need to know you didn't get time, or you create a new time or you figured out skip chase.

Speaker 2:

This is the time space. I told you about the time I touched the time space continuum.

Speaker 1:

It's like you guys are talking about time, space. I'm talking about space, time.

Speaker 3:

If Chase has been on, if Chase has been on a hundred podcasts here within lift, let's just say it was just a hundred. Yeah, he has mentioned that time isn't real. On probably at least 50%, I was going to say yes, yes, 90.

Speaker 2:

Hey.

Speaker 1:

I as often, as often as possible as often as possible.

Speaker 2:

Please be consistent. We'll play practical One of the books that highlighted the importance of putting my time where I wanted. It was essentialism and quite a bit you never heard of it.

Speaker 2:

Never heard of it. Never heard of it. Uh, daniel, is that the McKenna? Um, it's been a while since I read it. All right, and the gist of it is if it's not a hell, yes, it's a hell, no, you know. So that one really got me to respect my own time and to put it where it mattered, as opposed to run around like a dog chasing his tail. And I will echo what both you said. It's I've coached enough people who don't have time for themselves. I, in the Navy, I had zero time for me. I sold cars when I was younger and that was a time suck. I I could totally stay up till 10, 10 pm slugging espresso and getting work done, and getting ahead Like keep the espresso out of it and write myself blue like police tickets.

Speaker 2:

Uh, except I'd only be getting ahead in my coaching business, maybe because I wouldn't be embodying anything that I talk about, and I'd also be falling way behind with my wife and my daughter.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I think about that's the most critical component here is exactly parents, especially, and you know again I'm not a parent but Chase is and many of our clients collectively are, and you know you don't get that time back, no.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 3:

Period, and so I. It boggles my mind how, on a priority list, it seems based on actions that kids actually are, when the time is spent doing so many other things.

Speaker 2:

So I get it on a certain level, because without the tools and the awareness I have, it would be very easy to succumb to the pressure of I need to provide a life for her, I need to do all these things.

Speaker 1:

I need to yeah.

Speaker 2:

And it's, I get it. And uh, no, thank you Like, the way I provide a life for her is by showing up, yeah. Being there physically. Yeah, exactly.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah. It's like something that I think about in a lot of ways of the because really like running out of time is the phrase I don't have. The time is how people say it, and it's how do you want to choose to invest your time? How do you want to choose to? You know, spend your time is not like I, like invest better.

Speaker 3:

How do I want to?

Speaker 1:

invest my time. I like to invest my time in things that really I know are going to return like are going to give me that ROI.

Speaker 2:

I will say Kim, I know that you know where your time is going. This is in zero way in reference to how you spend your weekend, and if anybody tells me they don't have time for their family, their fitness or their business, and they turn around and tell me about the four Netflix series that they've been watching for the past five seasons, you're full of shit.

Speaker 1:

Oh it's, yeah, it's wild. I was, I had the um. It was interesting because I had that reflection of okay, I mean, you guys are boys, but whatever is like I had just started my bleed. I'm like I don't have, I don't physically have energy to do things, like I just want to like sit here and be in my bubble and enjoy myself, like I don't have anyone to be responsible for. I'm dog sitting, so I have a adorable French bulldog who can keep me company and like I'm just going to enjoy this.

Speaker 1:

It's something that I haven't done. I couldn't even tell you the last time I did that, and so it was like it's really like it was a rich experience because I was very much in my own internal world, which is, like you know, I personally I'm not going to turn this into a, you know, women's thing, but I find, like my period to be the most insightful time of my cycle and I get I get clear wisdom and I have really, really, really, I really enjoy that time. But I have to make the space to get quiet for it, because if I'm out doing all the stuff that I'm doing, I'm not going to get that Right. So being able to intentionally cultivate my time, but here's what happened while I was doing that.

Speaker 1:

All of the stories came in about you're not doing anything. You could be doing more. You should be out selling tickets to the enlist experience. You need to make sure that this is ready to go. Oh, you have to write this email. Oh, you need to follow up with this person. You have to make sure that this gets done. And it's literally all of the doing, doing, doing that I have to, and shame that comes with it and the pressure that comes with it. Then I have to say hey, wait, I'm going to park you over here because this isn't the time, like that's not.

Speaker 2:

what is the best? That's that New York speed.

Speaker 1:

Exactly, yeah, yeah.

Speaker 3:

One thing on time and then we can move to money, is I'm intentional with where I invest my time versus I'm intentional with where I invest my life. Hmm, totally different outcomes. Just replace the word time with life and you'll look at it completely differently At least I do.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I, yeah, I all of a sudden think about like. Then I think about too is like the quality of my time and as it relates to my energy, right? So, like going back to the experience of like, like I don't have a lot of energy while I'm menstruating, so what's the best use of that energy? That best use of that energy that's there is for me to recover, to recover, to go in, to go internal, to, to be slower to, to, to slow down. Like I didn't you know, like did I want to go Like. There's one day where it's like on Sunday I was like, oh man, I should just go take a row house class, like that'll be great, like I'll get. I'm like, no, stop, you don't need. Your body isn't asking for that. And so there's like the unraveling of, of the pressure of what to do with your time that I think a lot of people, when they say they don't have time, is really it just means that they don't have, they are experiencing too much pressure, Like their time is contracting versus their time is expanding.

Speaker 3:

And they're in their heads and not in their bodies.

Speaker 1:

Yes.

Speaker 3:

Right, that's. That's a key thing, because if, if you know, I was this past week, I had an opportunity it was Kay Jungle's birthday the chief himself one of my dear friends and he came to the, the immersion turn 30. And, as it's a tradition in our circles, we do really hard gnarly stuff based on the age in which we turn. And so it was like, yeah, we can run 30 miles once on Friday, or we can run three 10s and get 30 miles Right.

Speaker 3:

So we did a 10 on Wednesday, we did a 10 on Friday, and that 10 on Sunday came up and I had just had the thing going on, you know, and and if I was just in my head and not in my body, I would have gone on the run and it would have sent me back even further, you know, whereas I was able to take that time, relax, understand that, hey, this is what my body needs right now. And you know, I laid on the couch and for two straight hours under red light and watch the soccer game was great. There, it is the chief.

Speaker 1:

Dingo.

Speaker 3:

Good on him, and sometimes we need that downshift.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, totally. And I think there's a lot of the experience of like being an entrepreneur at least in it, especially being a female entrepreneur where it was like I need to produce all of the time I need to, I need to always be doing something, I always need to use my time to move my business, and it wasn't until I would say like, really, probably even more recently, once I now I have a team, like I work with a team, I have Adam and Mark, I have people that work with us in forest where I realize actually I don't have to do everything. Like that was a big like for me to sit back and say you guys can do this stuff, I don't need to do everything. I'm a recovering control freak. It came up three times in an energy work session that I had.

Speaker 1:

This woman was like you have control issues. I was like I know she's, like you have this is a. You know there's like fear of lack of control. I was like, okay, I get it, but like the thing is is like that's also part of like developing, like realizing that and only through trying to control, trying to make sure everything is being utilized with every ounce of time the day, then say, actually you know what, like this isn't the best use of my time. I could hire this person to do this and this is a better use of my time, and now I have all this other time where I can do these other things that are higher leverage, and that's just part of like you know. You figure out when you get to a certain stage where it's you don't have to wear all the hats and you could wear one hat really well and look, like you know, gorgeous in it.

Speaker 3:

Yep, At some point it just makes sense to pay somebody the neighborhood kid 20 bucks to mow your lawn.

Speaker 1:

Right, it just does.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, okay. So then this is a beautiful segue into money, right? So either. So the phrases would be I don't have the money, I you know, like, well, that's really it. It's like I don't have the time, I don't have the money.

Speaker 3:

Like I don't have the money, which I've fucking been there, yeah, Numerous times. I have dozens of snapshots of my bank account on my phone so I can like one day, but here's where I was in July 19th 2022 with under $87, you know, or something like that. Right, you know, but there's most people are. I don't want to prioritize or I don't want to spend this money.

Speaker 3:

They just don't want to spend it, or they got it but they don't want to put it on the card where they got it, but they don't want to pull out of savings. Or they got it but like, oh my gosh, that's an entire mortgage payment. Like I could you know?

Speaker 1:

etc. Right.

Speaker 3:

I'm sorry. There's a big difference between not having it and not wanting to spend it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, let's talk about. Let's talk about ourselves first, about the point where and I'll share my story first right off the bat Like when I quit my corporate job to go into coaching, I drained my bank accounts, maxed out credit cards, like I was like I'm hiring coaches, I'm going to make sure that, like I can get clients, and the first three months that I was working or no, I would say the first six months so the first three months that I left my corporate job I was living off of my 401k savings. Like I wasn't making hardly any money, like I just cashed out my 401k and was like this is what I want to do. The next three months, I was living off of like the little bit of money that was left from that. And then, like, starting to get some clients and eventually I hit a point where and I was working, like an hourly job at the gym I was doing what else was I doing? I was doing like as much as I could to like just keep cash coming through, but it was hardly enough.

Speaker 1:

And at some point in time, like that, the money that I cashed out of the retirement account was gone, the credit card was maxed. I had invested in the coaches and it was literally like all right, the resources are gone, so you have to earn it back. You have to earn it back like enough's enough. And what I realized in that like reflection of time, was that like I was spending without thinking about how it was going to be an investment towards building a business, even though a lot of it was and I could have earned, I didn't. I needed the experience of having to have the cash run out to actually light the fire, to make more money and it could have gone. Like I could have been making money the whole time was my point, but I literally had to get to that point where it's like nope, the money's gone, and now what? Because that that's what. That's what led me up enough to do it and it worked out. It worked out and it was terrifying.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, yeah, yeah, it's stressful. I've always been in that state, so it's always been like, whatever right, I've never really cared about the money, I cared about the time. And then, once I got the time, I was like, oh, okay, now I can add money to this equation. Now the it's like playing the long game again, the long tail, you know, and I understand it's on the way. I understand it's coming Like I don't want for anything in my life.

Speaker 3:

I'm very blessed and grateful to be in that position. You know, regardless of how much money I make or don't make, like I'm eating, I got roof over my head and I got the AC on in the summer, I got the heat on in the winter. You know like things are good and I think that the most beautiful thing in life can be a different perspective or a shift in perspective, and I've been really lucky to be able to travel when I was young and see places with you know where eight people live in this room the size this big, with a tin roof and dirt floor, and like, like it's all good, buddy.

Speaker 3:

It's all good, dave you know, and the money stories still come on in. The money stories still come, come in and out. I've just become a lot better at Managing my emotions, managing my physical state when it does occur, and understanding that, yeah, it is a long game. And if I looked at compound interest, it's like when does compound interest hit? You know, longer down the road, right, and so being in the game, being still here, is the biggest thing in the world, you know, starting to keep going. If I quit, then I definitely don't make it. If I keep going, I definitely will. And yeah, it's just, it's a. I also have the benefit of having looked at thousands and thousands of monthly family budgets and understanding that there's a ton of fat that can always be caught.

Speaker 3:

There's a ton of fat that can be caught. There's a ton of things. You know. I've got an old motorcycle helmet that I've never ridden one time. That was brand new, 400 bucks. It's still in the garage like. This is me personally, I really need it, I really want to go do it. I can probably sell that thing for 250, 300 bucks, you know. And it's like boom, there's some cash and you know, start going like dude, there's always I was watching. Always going to be okay.

Speaker 1:

A clip of the Ovan and I forget who and they're talking about Gary Vee and about how he hustles people.

Speaker 3:

I've seen that. That's so funny.

Speaker 1:

At garage sales.

Speaker 3:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Anyway, that's what that reminds me of. Yeah, here's what's interesting about the conversation around money stories in particular is I think that that is the place where it's going to be. That is the place where, even if you think you have no stories that you need to work through, like traumas that you need to work through or places that you're like you know that you're carrying, like everybody can always work on money stories, because money is quite literally infinite and unless you're talking about Bitcoin and save that conversation for something else, money in the world.

Speaker 2:

Save that conversation for Adam Chen.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, adam and Will, yeah, They've already done a pre-audition episode, like a year ago, and we just haven't posted it. So, quite literally, like fiat, money is infinite, it's everywhere, wealth is everywhere. Like there's so much money. One of my big takeaways being in New York a couple weeks ago was like I was like there is so much money moving here. And I come to Virginia and I look around and I'm like, yeah, there's also a lot of money moving here too. It's just different. And like we have this idea of thinking like, oh, I'm out of money and like how am I ever going to earn more money? How am I going to sell this $300 coaching package? Like it's like $300?.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, raise your rates Like Adam Chen. You know it's like one of those efforts like the experience of like people.

Speaker 1:

People really struggle to expand themselves when it comes to what like to understand the numbers of money in the game of money. That's one of the things that I'm constantly working on is money stories, and I have a lot of them and they run deep.

Speaker 3:

They're almost always inherited too. Oh they 1,000% are inherited, the only times my parents fought that I can remember were money related somebody didn't balance checkbook correct the year or shit got really tight.

Speaker 1:

Well, it's worse than that because I find myself I use money like my mother, like I know that I spend just like how my mom spent, like my patterns with spending is it is. It might as well just be my mom I might. I don't know what I'm supposed to do about this Like I'm trying to break the pattern. It's not working. And then I look with because I was with my siblings in New York and then I look at the difference between all three of our lives and I realize, oh, wow, okay, yes, we all earn different amounts of money. We all spend the same, live the same, use the same, with the exception. My sister has has one scarcity story that I think I have traced back to where how she got it that like drives her entire bus and it's, it's. She won't let me in there, but you know just keep chipping away and try chase, chase.

Speaker 1:

You might have some interesting stories around you in your in your gym space or even now with the other businesses that you're working in, like you've had to pay employees. There's just something that I've never had to do. Well, I've managed facility where I was in charge of payroll, but that's you know, it's like I'm not, like I'm not the one cutting the checks. Dave, you've never had an employee, have you?

Speaker 2:

No.

Speaker 1:

Okay, anything interesting there where that you've noticed with money stories, where it came up against, like how you're going to be able to pay someone else or how you're going to be able to meet bills or anything.

Speaker 2:

Absolutely. I mean, when I first opened my gym, I had my thrift savings plan from the military, which is the government 401k, and I pulled all of that out and it all went into buying equipment. And then I had one of my coaches come with me a few months into running the gym and he was operating on trays. He said hey, man, not a curiosity? You know when do you think we could? You know, you'd mention wanting to pay me. So yeah, probably when the gym has more than $1,000 in the bank account the end of the month after the bills are paid. Now, mind you, I'm running like a 4,000 square foot brick and mortar facility and I was going that thin every single month. Yeah, and through the years, as we grew, and develop the team.

Speaker 2:

I had well over $10,000 a month in payroll expenses the largest line item, easy, and I mean I had too much labor, for sure, if you want to look at running an efficient business, and I put the cart before the horse a bit because it was important. I told my staff in January, january, quarter one 2021. I said, hey, quarter two 2022. I'm not going to be a part of day to day operations. You know, we got a head coach, we got GM, we got a badass coaching team, like what. Let's go, you guys are the face of this place and I'm not a brick and dabber. I wasn't any piece of operations quarter one 2022, because I shut the gym down at the end of 2021.

Speaker 2:

And it there were multiple months, especially thanks to the government, over exercising their authority and shutting down the businesses and me listening because of the risk of potential blowback in the community if a brick and mortar decided to defy that. I mean, run a brick and mortar fitness facility through COVID was brutal and I mean we were lose $3,400 a month, which in some businesses isn't much. When you are doing 30 K a month at best in revenue like that, that's a good amount, you know, a couple months on end. So there were definitely months there and when I had the gym there was still recurring revenue and even if we lost money, there was this buffer. I once we did really well before we expanded.

Speaker 2:

Even after we expanded, before COVID, I got smart with the books. I went into profit. First I had a, I had a reservoir there. Now when I shut the gym down, all of a sudden, hey look, there's no money coming in recurring each month, just from people showing up every day. And, oh shit, now I'm online. I get to go find these people because no longer do I have a brick and mortar that like I am to them, like I'm just another face on the internet. They don't know that I've been into fitness since I was 12. They don't know that I have the discipline from four years in the military where I worked circles around people that were in for 12 years. They don't know that I ran a bad ass business for eight years and trained multiple coaches who went on to open their own badass facilities. I'm just some dude on Instagram telling them that they should trade in discipline for embodiment. Like who the fuck is this guy?

Speaker 1:

And that was pretty well With those apps.

Speaker 3:

you know I was about to put up the download video bro.

Speaker 1:

There's straps.

Speaker 3:

One thing here, one little known fact about my adventure into Mexico right before COVID is I ran out of money. That was one of my big hating factors. I moved out to San Diego to I be living with Danny reallies and all the strong coach guys and you know we just missed each other. I know we did.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I'm like all different chapter of my life. I actually ran out of money to when I came back from Mexico.

Speaker 3:

Well, so I that was part of it. I was going to be out there for six months and I was six weeks in and I had this opportunity and I was looking at, okay, like I'm going to put all like every dime of the rest of my savings into this down payment for this. You know, compound that we, we, you know, ended up going in on a whole four days closed, four days before the borders closed. So again, and you know, when I went down there, I a large part of that was me looking at housing, me looking at food and me looking at all the other aspects of you know, hey, what is my living expenses? What are my living expenses going to be? And it was the only way I could fathom making it work without moving back home.

Speaker 3:

Yeah because I couldn't afford to live in San Diego anymore, you know, and so that's.

Speaker 1:

I mean, that's similar to like what happened so same same, a different story with me in New York. I had gone, I had left for three months, I was in California and then I went to Mexico for a month and I was like running out of money, but it was also because I was like not really working nearly as much because I was playing a lot. I ended up coming back to New York thinking that that was going to be my stabilizer. I had like one consistent, like couple thousand dollars a month paycheck. I had a handful of clients and I was like new is going to make it work. I end up as soon as I get back, you know which, like my living expenses were probably like $3,000 a month give or take, and I was like just cutting it. And then I end up coming back and I lose the mainstream of my income and I was literally like fucking, fucking, fucking. Because I just decided to move back to New York. I just paid my landlord rent again Like what am I doing? And it was. It was a very interesting.

Speaker 1:

Not long after. That was when I took my job with row house, which was like a saving grace of like oh, a steady paycheck again, which like one of the things I want to say because Chase mentioned this in the beginning and I know we're coming up on time because one of you guys has something you got to go do save the world. You know the idea of like taking a job again, right, and I like at the time I was like I have been working on my own. I can't possibly go back to work for somebody else. I can't possibly like apply for jobs like this is crazy, but I'm actually out of money so I'm going to have to. And I ended up. I manifested this job with row house, which was the most perfect job for me. Spark notes like 10 years of rowing experience in high school and college.

Speaker 1:

Loved the sport. Like wanted to get into fitness coaching. Didn't really want to fitness coach. Ended up becoming the manager of the facility, training coaches, leading coaches down to the literally how I described the facility that I wanted to at the time. What I said own was that I wanted bright white walls on the outside and lobby and I wanted a dark room to train in. If you've ever been to a row house, it's exactly what it is like it was. It was spooky and it was the perfect thing for me, but I had to really work on the story of I'm going to take a job because I want to be an entrepreneur. I want to work on my own working in that job for I in total, I worked at row house for three years between managing facility and also coaching.

Speaker 1:

I learned so much working in corporate fitness that I was able to take into my role within lifted, that I was able to take into my own coaching, that I have changed this, change my life and looking for the job or thinking about taking another job. You don't have to sacrifice all the things that you think right. It's about changing the, shifting the story, because you can find the. You can find a job that can be pretty darn close, that will grow, you expand you and in a lot of ways I was having this conversation with a friend of mine who he's in a similar space, john, you guys heard him on the podcast already. I was telling him.

Speaker 1:

I was like, listen, if you are, if you are looking for a job within the fitness industry, go work for a company that is like a corporate fitness, like boutique fitness is corporate owned, because I'm going to give you so many systems and structures and and like processes and SOPs and everything's done like it's cookie cutter out of the box. You learn so much. Go do that for a year and come out and go do your own thing. You're going to have like reps under your belt that will expand you in ways you can imagine. And so it's like so much of this idea of like I never want to work for somebody else again. Well, like, technically, I work for Adam and Mark.

Speaker 3:

You know it's for the record. You know there's Like I'm totally open to working and for somebody else I just want to coach.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, you know, and that's exactly.

Speaker 3:

And if that's the the option of somebody's got a great program and they're looking for a great coach and they want me to plug in and like, fucking great dude, hit me up. You know, and I totally understand that sometimes life requires Taking a step backwards, so to speak, in order to gain skills, gain knowledge, gain some stability, to then take multiple leaps forward.

Speaker 3:

Yeah and that's. I haven't quite gotten to the point where I feel like I need to do that yet, and you know it's on the table, it's on the table. Part of that is like no, of course it's like.

Speaker 1:

It's the main point I wanted to make with. That is like start and keep going. Looks like a lot of different flavors. It does not, it's not linear and it may actually, you know, be some steps forward, steps back, steps to the side, steps to the left. Oh, fell down the stairs. Let me stand back up, you know.

Speaker 3:

It's like hop on the scooter.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

I'm the note of start and keep going. I believe it's Napoleon Hill who I saw outline this story about stopping three feet from gold. He tells the story of somebody who's you know. During the gold rush, they went out, they bought this plot of land and they're digging, they're digging, they're digging. Find all this equipment plan. They gave up, sold it off. Somebody bought the land, dug three feet further and found a massive gold vein. So start, keep going. The chops, aka the chops.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, fucking keep chopping, just keep chopping.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I think about this, like so often, in the sense of like this is the last thing I'm gonna leave us with, is like it can be In the process, right Like this is where I've been at right now, which is like part of the reason why I like thought about even having this topic of conversation Was, like it is as far as I've seen, that I've come as many of the things I've done that I wanted to do. You get to a point in the thing where you're at where it feels like I'm not far enough, I haven't done enough. Fuck this thing. Like I could go do something else. Like this isn't.

Speaker 1:

I'm not earning what I want to earn. I'm not getting what I want to get out of this. I'm not, you know, famous on YouTube, like what I don't know. Whatever, I'm making all those things up. That's not like yeah, cool, I don't like to be a YouTube content queen and like the experience of realizing that everything is in in its time, on time. Keep doing the thing and eventually this stuff will happen, because never in a million years, I think I mean this podcast. We've been doing this for almost two years, which is wild to think, and we're coming up on the two-year mark of the inception of this podcast.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, which is it just?

Speaker 3:

blows my mind. And three years or five years ago, ten years ago, you would kill to be where you are.

Speaker 2:

Most people over estimate what they can do in a year. Under estimate what they can do in three.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I mean I've had, like, I'll leave our listeners with this because they'll get to hear this before coming to the ill-fitted experience If you're coming, or leave this for you for FOMO if you're not coming. Like this is gonna be, this particular event is going to be a massive highlight in my coaching career of what I get to do and In the sense of host it and bring all these people together, it has brought up imposter syndrome for me. It has pushed me in places that, like I didn't want to learn or do that I've had to learn or do. It has stretched me as far as, like, being visible and being seen, and Every single part of it has been uncomfortable in some way, shape or form, and I'm very excited about it and I'm excited to feature.

Speaker 1:

So the way I really want to celebrate your 1000th session at the experience is we're going to do a podcast about it. We're going to podcast with chase. We're all going to get to podcast and sit down together with people who can come in and chat with us and be able to, like, get into this conversation with us because one it's fun into. Like you know it, this is how things start right. It's like we were sitting around At the lake house shooting the shit want it. Oh, it's just hard to podcast, no, and here we are now and I'm literally like I'm. The only thing I care about doing is podcasting, like and not the only thing. It's one of the top things I care about, and so it's a very different way to slip there.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, exactly.

Speaker 1:

I care about his podcasting and going to the beach, but it's very much like that experience of yeah, it's, no, this is. This is all a result of just keep showing up. Well, let's keep going thousand sessions keep showing up.

Speaker 3:

No doubt I got a head start. Y'all come catch me, I'm on the way.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, like just out of here I'm past, I'm, I'm past 500 top top ends man quality. Yeah, I mean, you keep, you keep on this pace, it's no workout. It's gonna it's you keep on this pace, going to make it difficult to catch you, and I'll keep my spot Coming up behind you.

Speaker 3:

Oh yeah, well, I need it. I doubt I'll chase mark, unless mark the tires earlier, something like that, you know. Or I doubt I'll catch him. Rather, and my greatest Person of development era was when I was trying to catch somebody else and I was trying to stay ahead of somebody else.

Speaker 1:

No, remember when Mike Bledsoe told you you can't make money just doing sort of we're coaching suck it. Yeah, so, funny, anywho all right gang, thanks, thanks. And a blast. We're gonna see you in the flesh and for the only second time that we've ever get to podcast with Jason person and that's gonna be really fun and exciting. And get your scoots, get your tickets to the experience. If you haven't yet you can. Maybe you can scooter here all the way from Austin, I don't know.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, what a journey, what a, what a dream Um they'll shut you off at some point.

Speaker 1:

I will metaphor for life. Oh fuck, anyway, that's it.

Speaker 3:

That's okay, peace.

Speaker 1:

Hey coach, ready to get your clients out of their own way and over their shitty mindset? Start by learning the words and make mindset coaching practical. Master the uplifted method and guide your clients to lasting results by changing their words. To enroll in the next class of in lifted level one certification, head on over to unliftedme and click get certified. Let us know your love in the show. Subscribe, leave a five star review and be sure to share it with your friends at Bercadabra.

Coaching Career and Personal Growth
1000 Sessions and Scooting in Richmond
Coaching Careers
Recognizing Limitations and Learning From Experience
Reflections on Goals and Timing
Time Management for Optimal Productivity
Managing Money Stories and Perspectives
Financial Challenges in Fitness Job Transitions
Catching Up and Staying Ahead