Catalyst Health, Wellness and Performance Coaching

Best-selling author Matt Fitzgerald: Running, Motivation and Life! [Best of Catalyst] - #040

July 01, 2019 Matt Fitzgerald Season 2 Episode 24
Catalyst Health, Wellness and Performance Coaching
Best-selling author Matt Fitzgerald: Running, Motivation and Life! [Best of Catalyst] - #040
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Catalyst Health, Wellness and Performance Coaching
Best-selling author Matt Fitzgerald: Running, Motivation and Life! [Best of Catalyst] - #040
Jul 01, 2019 Season 2 Episode 24
Matt Fitzgerald

Matt Fitzgerald is the author of some of our favorite books, including "How Bad Do You Want It" and "Ironwar." Now, with his new book on the shelves ("Life is a Marathon"), we thought it was the perfect time to bring this episode - one of your all-time favorites - back the the forefront as one of our rare "throwback" shows. 

Matt shares his insights, his passion, and his wisdom not only for endurance sports - but for this thing called life. He effectively communicates how we can make the most of it both in our own lives and the lives of our clients. Enjoy!

Show Notes Transcript

Matt Fitzgerald is the author of some of our favorite books, including "How Bad Do You Want It" and "Ironwar." Now, with his new book on the shelves ("Life is a Marathon"), we thought it was the perfect time to bring this episode - one of your all-time favorites - back the the forefront as one of our rare "throwback" shows. 

Matt shares his insights, his passion, and his wisdom not only for endurance sports - but for this thing called life. He effectively communicates how we can make the most of it both in our own lives and the lives of our clients. Enjoy!

Speaker 1:

Welcome to the latest episode of the catalyst, health and wellness coaching podcast. My name is Brad Cooper. I'll be your host. And today is an interview with Matt Fitzgerald. If you don't know Matt, you're going to want to get to know Matt when we're done here. He's a very well-known author. And in fact, he's written two of my all time . Favorite books. Matt became a runner at the age of 11. He ran the last mile, the 1983 Boston marathon with his father. How cool is that for a starting point? He never intended to marry his passion for sports, fitness and writing, but that's how it worked out. He moved to California in 95 for no particular reason. And the next thing you knew he was writing for the new magazine triathlete. Since then, he's been published in bicycling Maxim, men's fitness, men's health men's journal, outside shape stuff, and women's health. The son of a novelist. Matt have a special passion for writing books and his best-known titles include racing, weight, brain training for runners and triathlete magazines essential week by week training guide mats . Also a certified sports nutritionist and is served as a consultant to numerous sports nutrition companies. He also continues to design ready-made training programs for triathletes and runners that are sold through training peaks.com and final surge.com as well as customized plans available through his own website, Matt and tends to keep racing until he can't. He lives in Northern California with his wife Nataki who is more important to him. I'm glad to hear them both running and writing .

Speaker 2:

Let's jump in. All right .

Speaker 1:

Well, I appreciate you joining us today. A whole list of fun questions. First one out of the gate, what drew you to focus on endurance racing, coaching, and writing ? And I mentioned some of those , uh , elements in terms of history from your bio, but just in general, can you walk us through that?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so there was definitely no master plan. Um, you know, I I've always been someone who knows what he enjoys doing and insists on doing what he enjoys. And I , I grew up as a runner , um, developed a passion for writing when I was also quite young. Um, there was a little bit of chance involved that , you know, when I moved to California in 1995 , uh, from the Philadelphia area , um, I wanted a writing job. Uh, the first one I got just happened to be with a startup , uh , triathlon magazine and, and that I actually wasn't running at the time, but that, you know , open door , uh , sort of , um, it led to every other door that opened , uh , subsequent , um, and you know, I started training and competing again. Um, and you know, at first I was just a journalist, you know, I didn't consider myself any kind of expert, but you know, the more immersed I became in the endurance sports, I started to develop an expertise. So started coaching became a certified sports nutritionist. Um, and then , uh, you know, it just, I kind of swung in every pitch , uh , uh , you know , did some consulting speaking , um, and you know, now it's more than shoot 20 years into the journey and I'm a pretty happy with how things have shaken out.

Speaker 1:

Wow. That's awesome. I just noticed I've got my personal two favorite books of yours in front of me, and I just noticed that Samuel Mark Cora did your foreword for how bad do you want it? That leads nicely into our second question. Cause obviously Dr. Mercola is big on the evidence-based practice elements. What role are wellness coaches are battling that constantly. They're , they're working with clients that are reading the headlines and then come to them with some crazy idea. What role do you see evidence-based practices having in your coaching and your writing and why put the emphasis there and connecting with guys like Mark Horrow when it's easier just to follow the dramatic. Yeah ,

Speaker 3:

Yeah. You know, I'm someone who, you know, it starts with , uh, with my own athletics, you know, my own interest in, in competing and succeeding. I want to know what works, not what's popular or new or sexy, you know, I just, I don't care what it is as long as it's legal and safe, you know, and as a coach, you know, I want to be right. Um, you know, I'm not just going to latch onto something because I think I can make a buck or get my name out there. Um, so that's really where it starts, you know, I'm, I'm, you know , desperately afraid of being wrong or, you know, failing with an athlete I coach. So , um, you know, I tend to go , uh, take, you know , because I still really don't consider myself an innovator. I'm more of like a conduit from , uh, the real brainiacs out there to , uh, you know, everyday folks. Um, so, you know, I keep an eye on science, but , um , also I pay a lot of attention to what the most successful athletes in the real world do, you know, at the elite level , um, because you know, their livelihood is at stake. So when you talk about evidence-based , um, it's not just science, it's also, you know, real world evidence as well.

Speaker 1:

Nice, nice. Okay. So our audiences, I mentioned current or future health and wellness coaches, any advice you have for them as you've interacted with these different athletes for the other stuff. So some of their clients will be athletes. Some of them will be focused in the fitness arena, but other elements, you know, the sleep, the stress, the life balance , have you, have you come across some of those things as you've worked with these high level athletes and interview some of these folks for your different books that might be helpful for the coaches?

Speaker 3:

Yeah. W you know , with endurance athletes, the thing I love about working with them is that they don't need to be motivated. They just, you know, they, they, they bring that to the table. Um, so I take advantage of that because they're not there they're motivated to train. And, you know, th th they are motivated enough to want to spend money on the sport and put to , you know, invest time in it , uh, you know, sacrifice and other parts of the lives. But, you know , the motivation to do some of the ancillary stuff that supports their athletic ambitions, like, you know, eat right. Uh, that comes from actually a different well of willpower, if you will. So sometimes in my work with them, you know, I like them to have to have clarity on how everything fits together and everything matters. And obviously, you know, if , if you're, if you are an amateur athlete and your livelihood, doesn't depend on it, you have to set a limit in terms of like, how much you're going to prioritize the sport . But I really like, I like athletes to have clarity on, Hey, you know, if you want to be the best runner, the best triathlete you can, you can be, it's not all training. Um, and, and, you know, I think that that same paradigm applies to non athletes who are chasing other sorts of goals as well. They, you know, they may think that, you know, only two or three things, really two or three things really matter, and the way doesn't get, sort of get them to buy into some of the stuff they're not as motivated to tackle is to just, you know, get them to really understand , uh, the impact that it does have. I mean, like, you know, take something like S like sleep. It's like the first thing to go for so many people, but I mean, you're doomed without it. You're not gonna succeed in marathon training, and you're not really going to think very clearly at work or , or whatever else, you know, whatever your goals may be.

Speaker 1:

So you , you nice lead into the next question. Are there certain, you mentioned sleep, are there certain areas outside of the swim bike run core, maybe even nutrition as our primary areas for endurance athletes? Are there other ways that you're starting to see a lot more kind of the ball's getting dropped in those areas as they focus on the other four or five?

Speaker 3:

Yeah. Sleep is number one. And then some of 'em , you know, I guess I like injury prevention, just sort of like people, people need to keep in mind that health is the foundation of fitness. So, you know, you can't, you know, some athletes , uh, you know, they're, they're inclined to just not eat enough, you know , especially a lot of the female athletes that I deal with, you know, and they think they, they sort of think, well, the skinnier, I get the, you know, the faster I'm going to run, but, you know, I'll point I'll point to, you know, athletes, you know, top female , uh, endurance athletes who have long successful careers. And, you know, the I make is like, these people are healthy. Like they, you know, you might have, you might lose 10 pounds the wrong way and have one good race. You're not going to still be , uh , you know , having a lot of success and developing as an athlete two , three years from now, unless you just have a solid, consistent foundation of health. Um, so there's all kinds of balls. People will drop with respect to a main building and maintaining that foundation. One that I'm always beating the drum on with, with athletes is , um, some of the stuff like, you know, foam rolling and , and, you know, mobility exercises and stuff that like, you know, I get it. Like, I gotta make time for that too,

Speaker 1:

But you know what I mean?

Speaker 3:

Like it's like sooner or later, you either get on board with it the easy way, or you get hurt and you gotta get on board the hard way.

Speaker 1:

Right. Right. Man, I love that. So health is the foundation of fitness. That is, there's your next book title, man. That is that's so key. So, so did you come across that accident? Like, did you just keep seeing over and over and over either in your own training and racing or in the , the clients you were working with? Has that been something you've always seen as a, as a core piece? Or is that something that, what over time? It just became so obvious health is the foundation of fitness. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

I came at it, I guess, intellectually versus experientially is, you know, I, I was an English major in college, so I don't come from, you know, a biology, chemistry background. So I was sort of late to the party and had to bone up on my exercise physiology. But, you know , when I did, you know, crack open the textbooks and , and learn what I found was, you know, everything you need, like all of the , uh, uh , physiological underpinning paintings of endurance fitness are just are like, they're more of the same of what you need for health. You know what I mean? Like a lean, a lean body composition, or, you know, high level of insulin sensitivity and , uh , lean muscle tissue. Like you want some of that just to be healthy and you want more of it, you know, a strong immune system , um, a good inflammatory control system, all these things it's total overlap. They, they, they help you just feel good and be functional , uh, and it'll avoid disease and live a long life, but they also help you train effectively recover and succeed on race day as well. Um, so it's just kind of like a , a basic biological fact, you know, that health is in fact the foundation of fitness,

Speaker 1:

So good, man. That is so good. Okay. So you've written a lot about nutrition and fueling for athletes, any tips kind of , you don't have to go through all your books right now, but , um, and, and feel free to reference a book or two that you feel like would really be applicable for this audience, but any specific things, tips that you could provide the listeners. And again, the listeners are either current or future wellness coaches, if they are working with athletes, any little tidbits that you think might be good too , that would take them beyond the typical things they read about.

Speaker 3:

Yeah. You know , when I'm always encouraging athletes to do in , in their nutrition or in their efforts to , uh, you know, turn diet and nutrition to their greater advantage, as athletes is to think in terms of tweak , don't overhaul , um, you know, in the , uh, you know, the , the diet culture, the , you know, the popular diet culture , uh, that we are currently surrounded by , uh, there's, there's this tendency to like, you know, a diet has a name and you go on it and it's like, it doesn't matter. It doesn't matter. Like, it doesn't matter what you've been doing in the past. Like what you like, what you're used to, what seems to work for you versus maybe not everyone. And then it's just like, throw all that all out and start over. I encourage, I always, you know, when an athlete, you know , wants me to help him or her with, you know, with , uh, you know, an improved diet, I don't just tell them here's the diet. I asked them a bunch of questions I want to, I don't want to know everything about what they're doing now, because I want to change as little people generally, by and large, they eat the way they do for a reason. You know, they like it it's convenient, whatever. Um, so I, I just, I, I want , wanted to know where they are now. Um, and, you know, look at, you know, just some basic , uh , just doable things that, that they can adjust in order to get better results. And once you're getting the results you want, don't change anything more than you have to, because it will make the whole thing more sustainable,

Speaker 1:

Man. You're , you're giving us some nice sound bites here, tweak don't overhaul. I mean, for our coaches, coaches, are you hearing this stuff? I mean, tweak don't overhaul that's that is that that's the wisdom, man. Um, okay. So now onto my selfish part of this interview, you've written my, probably two of my favorite 10 books of all time. And they're sitting right in front of me . How bad do you want it? And iron war, dude, I swear to you every time I competed Kona , iron war, even though it's a worn out hardback with the pages bent and tweaked and all that, it still finds its way into my limited suitcase space. And then how bad do you want it? I mean, you talk about motivation from the get-go dude , so good. So good. So I'm looking for more of these, keep this up. This is great stuff, but as you're working, these are the best athletes in the world II generationally that you're talking about in both of these books are there. So some of the things that they do, maybe don't apply to, you know , Dave, Scott racing, the school bus to school at age, whatever , uh, on his bike, probably isn't something we're going to encourage our kids to do right out of the gate. But are there certain lessons that you picked up from talking to these generationally amazing, incredible athletes that

Speaker 3:

Would apply to broader aspects of our own lives? Yeah, for sure. And , you know , it's tough. I wrestle with this because I naturally, I'm sort of a best practices oriented person. So, you know, I like to look at what the greats are doing and say, well, you do that too, but you have to keep in mind. It's not all duplicable, you know , uh, you know, we can't, you know, some, some, you know, some people are just born with something special and you know , that's fine, but I think there is stuff. It it's helpful at least to understand what some of the consistent , uh, magic is that , you know , that , that all these , uh , you know, world beaters tend to have just , uh , on the psychological side, you know , sort of at a 50,000 foot level, the thing I see over and over and over with these athletes is a high level of self-trust. Um, if you want a sound bite , the , uh, the , the phrase I like to toss out is it's just me against the world. And I like my chances like that , that is the attitude these folks have. And it doesn't mean they don't like have, you know, moments of doubt or, you know, moments where they lose confidence, but they're, they're , they're , they're not always scrambling looking , uh, for, you know, for answers outside of themselves, you know, because ultimately, you know, it's just a series of decisions and judgment calls that get you from point a to point B whatever point B is for you. And it's funny that, you know , a lot of the top athletes, they're not necessarily the most physically gifted folks, like the most physically gifted ones are usually kicking butt as freshmen in high school, but they're not necessarily the ones who are, you know , world beaters, 10, 12 years down the line often, it's the people who have just a little less physical talent than that, but a little more something going for them, you know, between the ears and that self-trust piece I see over and over. And it's, you know, I don't, it's not the easiest thing in the world to train, but I'm sort of, it's one of those things that I'm sort of working on now. It's like, how , how much of that can we take out of the brain of a Dave Scott and impart into others, but it just to make it really concrete, like one of the tips I give people athletes when I'm trying to sort of develop a greater level of self-trust in them is to get them into the habit of giving themselves the same advice they would give to someone else. Cause often, you know , w w we have that voice of reason inside us, but we have difficulty applying it to, to ourselves. So it's just, you know, if you have, you know, some kind of setback, some kind of challenge that you encounter , uh, you know , w when you're looking for an answer, imagine it's a friend of yours , uh, who who's going through that challenge and, and chances are, you'll be able to come up with some good advice for that person, and then just turn around and apply it right to yourself. You can, I think through little tricks like that, you can start to bootstrap your way toward that, that , uh, you know, critical self-trust ,

Speaker 1:

You know, as you say that, I think that's another great tool for the coaches to use, to encourage their clients. What advice would you give someone else? How do you play that to you? But at the same moment, I'm saying, well, that's really good idea. I struggle mightily in applying that basic concept in my own life, and I know better I'm right. But so have you seen kind of that next layer of okay. Agree, like, we all think that's good advice. That's a route to go, but I am not good at doing so, any kind of second level advice of when you're not used to doing this, I've found this to be a little tweak or trick or whatever, to help that be more consistent or to get started doing a little bit of that. Any , anything like that you can throw out to us, or maybe just,

Speaker 3:

Yeah, well, you know, I , you know, I guess, you know, kind of a next step is , is just to think about , um, you know, outcomes, you know, what, what are the risks of making decision a versus decision B? Um, what are the , the possible pluses of going in one route versus the other? And what's, you know, how do you weight the risk? You know, what's, what's a more likely outcome, the good or the bad when you, when you make a decision, a versus decision B sometimes, you know, it all sounds very rational and the problem is emotion gets mixed up in all this, but sometimes it's just, you can sort of, you can sort of , um , you know, help your rational side, you know , take the wheel in your mind by actually putting this stuff down on paper. Um, you know, it's like, I know the smart thing is to do X, but I'm really attempted to do Y and just, you know, sit down with a sheet of paper and a pen if people still use these instruments anymore and, and lay out pros and cons and just, you know, you'll have it looking, you know , staring you in the face. And it just, it's just a funny thing, you know, last , last summer I spent in Flagstaff training with a team of professional runners, and I have never seen more athletes fail out of workouts than I did among these professional athletes, you know , go to the Olympics. And it's because of judgment. Like, it's not because they're not tough, they're the toughest people, right . But they're also, they have toughness in space, but they, they just stay rational. You know, like, they'll get 24 miles into a 26 mile, you know , depletion run, you know, four weeks out from, you know, a marathon and, you know, like their hip starts acting up and they just stop. And, you know, it is so tempting to run those last two miles. I'm so close. And, you know, my , my, my confidence is going to take a hit, but I saw it again and again, not just with one runner, there were a, on the team and they all did it and they just live to fight another day. And , um, you know, so yeah, I'm not just saying this because it sounds good. Like, it really is a key to success. It's just to, you know, to learn, to practice good judgment consistently. You don't have to prove your toughness over and over and over again. You've got , gotta be tough. Yes. But also as, as smart as you are.

Speaker 1:

Oh man. So good. So good. There's another book for you. You can have that positive bailing out strategies or something like that. That's just quit, quit now tomorrow. So we've got some endurance coaches, we got endurance coaches that ended up getting their wellness coach certification as kind of a way to broaden their audience too , to expand that out. So I'd love to get without you giving all your secrets away, but you do a lot of endurance coaching. So any on the business side, any tips for those people that are listening that are saying, Hey, I want to grow my endurance coaching. And I happen to get this one coach certification, but man, I'd love to hear a tip from Matt. Any, again, you don't have to give us the big secrets, but anything that you think would be helpful in general about building their business, either as a broader coach wellness coach, or specifically to endurance coaching or some combination of the two. Yeah.

Speaker 3:

You know , this is , um, you know, I get versions of this question fairly often. I find it a tough one to answer just because my, the path I've traveled is so unique. And yet I do think there's something that is, that can be learned , uh, from, from my example. And, you know, in my case, you know, I, as I mentioned, I started off as a , as a writer , um, and then sort of became , uh , a coach and an expert in authority or what have you, and what I've found, you know, now that I'm , I'm kind of, both of these things is that, you know, so much of succeeding this in this sort of business is just standing apart from the noise. You know what I mean? Like th th there's a lot of competition out there and, you know, simply being good at what you do is , is no guarantee of success. Like, just people have to know you exist. You know, you have to have some kind of reputation. Like I had that problem solved before I even was good at what I was doing, you know, cause , you know, cause my name was out there. And so, but you know, that that's pretty powerful. Um, so people who were kind of coming at it from the other direction, I would just encourage you. Like don't underestimate the importance of, of, you know, putting a time and effort and you know, not just into practicing , uh, your, your coaching thing, but into, you know, building your name, getting it out there, you know, you know, I'm a writer by profession, but everyone learns how to write in school and you know, starting, it's never been easier, you know, you can, you know, find ways to contribute to websites or, you know , have a blog or use social media, you know , to quote unquote, create content and , and build your brand. And then, you know , uh, cause you know, if you build it , you have to build it and marketing .

Speaker 1:

All right , good stuff. So on that note then, so if your own coaching practice and obviously writing is your , your heart, that's where everything started and you love doing that and you always have, your dad was a novelist, but what , where do you see your coaching practice developing, expanding over the next decade? Or where would you like to see it expanding and developing over the next decade?

Speaker 3:

Yeah , yeah . That question is timely. So, you know , I do a little bit of one-on-one coaching, but a lot of sort of coaching and mass , um, uh , you know, have , um, you know, training plans that sort of sit online and, you know , people can choose them all a cart. And I have a kind of a custom training plan service, which is, it's a nice, sweet stop spot between full one on one coaching and the sort of cookie cutter ready-made stuff. So I've , I have this business called 80 20 endurance. I have a partner in it , uh , David warden , triathlon coach. So we've got a little momentum behind this thing. You know, there are a couple of books that are getting that 80, 20 shtick out into public view. And it's sort of, it's one of those things where I told you I swing at every pitch. It was just another pitch I swung out, but it's really gained some traction. Um, and I , I would like to, you know, I'm not really a businessman, but I am in the process of sort of like getting the right help the pieces in place to sort of turn this into a proper business. Um, you know, to actually include some offline elements like clinics, maybe a coaching certification program also to do more of what we're already doing. So it's kind of fun , you know, I'm, you know, I'm 47 years old now and um, you know, I like what I'm doing, but I also like to just take random left turns. And , and so this is one that I think could be kind of fun for the decade ahead is just , uh , uh, we're more of a business hat and see where we can take this thing. And , and what makes me feel good about it is that it's really started with a demand. It's not something I'm forcing down people's throat. It was just, it was just something I thought was valuable that I offered and it just, it kind of just people liked it and wanted more of it.

Speaker 1:

Well, congratulations. I'll look forward to following you with that. That sounds awesome. Okay. So now moving from your business to you, we always like to ask folks about, okay, we're talking wellness coaches listening on your personal life. Are there certain areas outside of your direct training, you're getting ready for a race, but in terms of your broader health and wellbeing , are there certain areas, or maybe just pick one that you're focused on now and any insights about how you're going about that and how it's going good or bad?

Speaker 3:

Yeah. You know, one thing that, that I have learned to do more of is to not try solve everything, myself, fix everything myself. You know, I mentioned that Flagstaff professional or fake professional runner experience I had, you know, it was kind of humbling in a way because I went into that feeling like I knew what I was doing, but then, you know, I was coached by, you know, a true elite level coach and , uh , had the resources, you know, the physical therapy and, and you know, all the other stuff that, you know, professional athletes have. And , uh , I feel like I, I felt like I aged 15 years, you know, I ran the fastest marathon. I ran the fastest marathon of my life. It was like my 40th marathon. I beat like a nine year, nine year old , personal best. I thought I would know I wouldn't touch again. And I thought, wow, I really didn't know everything. So now going forward, I've kind of shifted back into triathlon mode and I'm just, I'm sort of making, I'm just being PR exercising, more humility and just getting help from people who are just, you know , specialists, you know, we're also kind of siloed these days and in our areas of expertise and yeah, I know a thing or two, but I don't know everything. So for example, on Friday of this week, I'm going to spend an entire day at this kind of fancy , uh, athlete oriented, physical therapy outlet in Palo Alto, California, just getting all con all manner of testing, done, having my annual swim stroke videotaped and getting a bike fitting cause I'm very injury prone. And I'm sort of, kind of all dinged up right now. And I'm just going to show up at this place and say, I'm in your hands. You know, I just, I just want to be healthy. I , I'm not that great at doing it all by myself. And one thing I can trust myself to do is just do what they tell me, you know, because I've learned the value of, you've got to choose your experts. You got to choose your resources carefully, but once, you know, you have that, you know , faith in the people you've chosen to help you out, just let them do it. And so, you know , that's, that's what I'm trying to do.

Speaker 1:

Thanks for sharing that with us. Really appreciate that. So last question, just any kind of wide open, any tips, comments, anything as you think about someone in, or considering going into the health and wellness coaching arena, any last little tidbits, tips, comments, ideas that you'd like to throw out there for them ?

Speaker 3:

Yeah. You know, one thing I thought of sharing in answer to that question is , um, the value of walking the walk and being seen by your clients and potential clients doing that. That's really powerful. Um, you know, I think, you know, I mentioned the importance of, you know , building a reputation and a brand and marketing yourself, but just, just modeling the lifestyle that you're trying to get other people to follow. Um, you know, I am an athlete and I like to share my journey and I just, I noticed time and again, that people really latch onto that when they , they see that I'm out there doing exactly what they're trying to do. And also, you know, I try to be very transparent and, you know , vulnerable as well. W when I just want to have a setback, I don't hide it when I don't know an answer. I admit it. Um, when I fail, I fail publicly, but , um, uh, it can be a little scary to do that, but just , um, people, people value, they want to see realness, you know? Um, so you know, you , cause there's an aspirational element that they don't, you know, your clients don't want to and just know you're knowledgeable. Uh, they, you know, they value sort of authenticity and it's easier to get people to do something if , if you're doing it yourself

Speaker 1:

And where, how do people fall ? Like I know how to follow you, but do you want to share Twitter, Facebook, that kind of stuff. Best ways to keep up with latest books, latest things you're working on the journeys, the realness. I mean, there , there were just so many nuggets in this little

Speaker 3:

30 minute chat that I think

Speaker 1:

They, I mean, you're going to have a lot of folks that are like, Hey, I like that guy. I want to follow what he's doing. So the best way for people to track you down.

Speaker 3:

Yes . Yeah. My personal website is not Fitzgerald dot O R G . There's also the 80 20 endurance.com business hub. I am on Facebook and Twitter is at Matt fit writer. Well, buddy, I really appreciate it. Thanks for jumping on with us and we'll call it today . All right . Enjoy

Speaker 2:

[inaudible] .

Speaker 1:

I hope you enjoyed this throwback episode. This was one of our most popular episodes of all time. And there's a good reason for that. And that has Gerald has a new book out. It was not mentioned during the podcast because it wasn't ready back when we recorded this originally, but it's called life is a marathon it's definitely worth picking up. As I mentioned earlier, he's also the writer of two of my all-time favorite books titled iron war. And the second is how bad do you want it? I rarely, rarely read books a second time. And I've read both of these multiple times, definitely worth picking up. If you have any questions about your career about this whole certification process, how it works, continue education for coaches, the coaching retreat, any of those kinds of things. You know where to find us [email protected] drop us a note. When you set up a time to chat, that's what we're here for. We talk to folks every single day about how this whole coaching thing works, what the industry looks like, how to prepare for the national exam, any of those kinds of things. So feel free to drop us a note, all kinds of details available on our new website. Pretty excited about [email protected], including details about the upcoming certification, fast track programs. We now offer those both in Colorado and an upcoming one this fall in New Jersey. And we've got the coaching retreat in Estes park, Colorado that is teed up and buy . That's going to be exciting. So if you're listening to this prior to September and your coach, you might want to check that out in any case. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for spreading the word. You know where to find us. We are here for you anytime . And remember, we talk a lot about our best self in this whole thing called coaching, but folks it's all about, better, better than yesterday. Best self can be so intimidating can be scary. It can be overwhelming, but better. Hey, we can do that. Right. We can help others do the same. So thanks for joining us. I'll look forward to speaking with you soon on the next episode of the catalyst, health and wellness coaching podcast.

Speaker 2:

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