Subscription Box Answers

How The Burn Box Became A Million Dollar Business (With Thomas Ansu)

October 21, 2023 Liam Brennan
How The Burn Box Became A Million Dollar Business (With Thomas Ansu)
Subscription Box Answers
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Subscription Box Answers
How The Burn Box Became A Million Dollar Business (With Thomas Ansu)
Oct 21, 2023
Liam Brennan

Have you ever wondered how a simple idea can transform into a million-dollar business? Get ready to fuel your curiosity as we welcome Thomas Ansu, founder of The Burn Box, a tailored subscription box service for firefighters. He shares his inspiring journey of how his passion for firefighting led to the conception and success of The Burn Box, which delivers firefighter gear, tools, and apparel right at your doorstep.

Dive straight into the intricacies of running a subscription box business as we discuss the challenges that come with scaling this unique venture. Hear how Thomas ran a perfect prelaunch to prove his concept and then scaled up his business using paid ads. He sheds light on critical elements such as pricing, customer acquisition costs, and fulfilment, and stresses the significance of offering one-time products and upsells to maximise lifetime value.

Thomas gives fantastic advice for anyone aspiring to build their own successful Subscription Box Business, He discusses how important it is to have top-notch customer service so you can solve issues quickly. He also highlights the need for negotiation skills when dealing with suppliers to ensure you are getting the best possible margin. 

The Subscription Box Experts Academy Opens On October 25th. You can join the waitlist by clicking here

If you have a question you want answered. Please join the Free Subscription Box Resources Facebook Group By Clicking here

You can book me at the Subbly Experts Bar At SubSummit On June 18th From 9AM - 1030 AM. Click Here To Book

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Have you ever wondered how a simple idea can transform into a million-dollar business? Get ready to fuel your curiosity as we welcome Thomas Ansu, founder of The Burn Box, a tailored subscription box service for firefighters. He shares his inspiring journey of how his passion for firefighting led to the conception and success of The Burn Box, which delivers firefighter gear, tools, and apparel right at your doorstep.

Dive straight into the intricacies of running a subscription box business as we discuss the challenges that come with scaling this unique venture. Hear how Thomas ran a perfect prelaunch to prove his concept and then scaled up his business using paid ads. He sheds light on critical elements such as pricing, customer acquisition costs, and fulfilment, and stresses the significance of offering one-time products and upsells to maximise lifetime value.

Thomas gives fantastic advice for anyone aspiring to build their own successful Subscription Box Business, He discusses how important it is to have top-notch customer service so you can solve issues quickly. He also highlights the need for negotiation skills when dealing with suppliers to ensure you are getting the best possible margin. 

The Subscription Box Experts Academy Opens On October 25th. You can join the waitlist by clicking here

If you have a question you want answered. Please join the Free Subscription Box Resources Facebook Group By Clicking here

You can book me at the Subbly Experts Bar At SubSummit On June 18th From 9AM - 1030 AM. Click Here To Book

Speaker 1:

Welcome to Subscription Box Answers with your host, liam Brennan. You're no rubbish, no crap. Straight to the point podcast with real, actionable tips, real strategies and insights from the industry which will help you start and grow your own successful subscription box business. You ask the question, you ask the questions, liam gives the answers. It's as simple as that.

Speaker 2:

Welcome back to another episode of Subscription Box Answers. I hope you're having a really great week On today's episode of the pleasure of sitting down with a friend from the subscription box industry who's doing really great things, Thomas Anzu, who is the founder of the Burn Box, which is a firefighter subscription box. How are you, Thomas, hey?

Speaker 3:

how's it going, Liam? Hello everyone, I'm super excited to be here with you. I hope I can provide some value to people listening.

Speaker 2:

Thanks very much for jumping on. I know you're a very, very busy man, so I really appreciate you taking time out your day to jump on and sharing some value with the listeners. First of all, do you want to explain what the Burn Box is?

Speaker 3:

Yes, the Burn Box is a firefighter subscription box. I've been a firefighter for the last 10 years. I worked as an EMT paramedic for five years in New York City. It's something that I'm passionate about Basically every month. What we do is we ship out tools, gear and apparel to different firefighters across the US.

Speaker 2:

Brigant, you started this business a few years ago now. If I remember correctly, it was just at the start of the pandemic. It's growing. Is that correct? Was it just at the start or just before?

Speaker 3:

Yes, it's crazy. Maybe if I knew that that was coming I probably wouldn't have started, but it was just before. Looking back now I'm surprised that I didn't go out of business. I guess subscription boxes did pretty well during the pandemic 100%.

Speaker 2:

Anybody with a direct to consumer subscription did quite well during the pandemic.

Speaker 3:

Yes, I guess it just all worked out. Yes, long story short, when I got to my firehouse, a lot of different people I worked with have their own firefighter products. Some guys make tools, some guys make t-shirts. I decided that I wanted to look into firefighter-owned products. I searched the hashtag on Instagram and found a whole bunch of people doing t-shirts, tools, hats. I thought it'd be really clever if I could make a, bundle it up and pack it out and just make it easier for people to find products they never heard about. The goal is, if I can get a product that a firefighter made in his garage out to 10,000 people, I thought that'd be really cool. That's what started it. I always wanted to start a business and the burn box was just the perfect blend of my career and my passion.

Speaker 2:

It's a really great idea. I remember when you came to me at the start and you're like I've got this idea for a firefighter subscription. I remember reading the message. I was like I've never heard of a firefighter subscription before because a lot of the time people they do something like in a mass market niche Even for us we're in the dog niche. You get people with gym boxes, beauty boxes, whatever. I remember you came to me and I was thinking to myself it will either go one way or the other. It will either absolutely take off or it may be difficult to market it, but it's a really good concept. Thankfully it's completely blown up. It's a million-dollar business now, isn't it?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, it's doing really well. To be honest with you I'm laughing because I'm a member of the conversation I had with you. I was doing lots of research and I couldn't decide if I want to do monthly by monthly. I couldn't decide the price point. You had your Facebook group and you were always in there providing value.

Speaker 3:

I said, hey man, I need your help. I don't know if you remember how terrified I sounded because I didn't have anything. I thank you all the time. I know you're probably tired of it, but I owe a huge thanks to you, man. You helped me so much. I wouldn't be where I am today if it wasn't for you. But you didn't say that. If you told me what, you just said, hey man, it could be really good or really bad. I might not have done it. You were real good. You were like, hey man, you just told me. You said, hey, test it. It's crazy how that sticks to me, because I see people in the group or I have friends that pre-launch, the test proof of concept, is huge. I had no idea what I was doing. I'm glad I listened to you, took your advice and it all worked out.

Speaker 2:

Well, thanks very much. I do appreciate that. But you deserve all the credit for this because all the crazy hours that you work and stuff and the amount of effort you've put into this business to get it where it is today. But now I remember when you reached out and I'd never put somebody's idea down or something. The right thing is to test it to see if there's actually market demand. But I remember thinking to myself that is a crazy idea. But look, crazy ideas work every now and again and really, really impressive. So this is your first company. Yeah, you've never said open-border business before this.

Speaker 3:

Yes, Burnbox was my first crack at it. I've always had a passion for business. I sit and watch Shark Tank when I was on the ambulance all day. I always wanted to start something. I think I stumbled across there's another company, I don't know if I can say their name, but they're a survival subscription box. Yeah, that was for sure. Bought a battle box.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, john, I was on the podcast a few weeks ago.

Speaker 3:

Oh really, yeah, those guys. I want to meet those guys. Hopefully I see them next year at Sub Summit. But yeah, I saw their products and it just clicked. I was in. It just blended the two together. I was like, oh, I could do this. There's a lot of people that came to my firehouse. They wouldn't want to buy t-shirts, they wouldn't want to buy. We have coins and stuff and there's a lot of guys selling. It just all worked together. Once I saw that battle box thing, it just clicked. But the problem was I didn't know if people wanted it and I couldn't figure out pricing. So when you gave me the advice about testing it, it all came together. That was just the beginning. Once you get to prove the concept, then you got to get to work. So it wasn't like all rainbows after that.

Speaker 2:

But a lot of the time people they think build it and they'll come. You just build it and people will just start selling up. Unfortunately, it's rare to hear like that. Did you find that the same for you?

Speaker 3:

So one thing I do think was in my benefit was there's nothing else like it in, like for firefighter. So I think that that kind of helped me. There wasn't much competition and I tried to be very strategic with the products that I put into the boxes. So I'm going to say this and I'm not going to say that this is probably not the best advice, but what I did was the first year I didn't make any money. I'm sure a lot of businesses don't make money but a lot of boxes I broke even on just because one, I knew in the future that hopefully I would get the quantity, and two, I strategically put products in the boxes that I knew had followings. So that way I know if this guy posted a picture of it, it was going to get eyes on my product. If this other guy who I featured in that same month put, posted pictures on Instagram or Facebook, I would get the cross promotion aspect.

Speaker 3:

It got a lot of views across this whole. It's a small niche but just strategically picking partners that I knew was going to get me the exposure was huge, also getting me subscribers. It was crazy. I remember the first month I did a pre-launch. I tested it. I had 800 people fill out a survey. Everyone, a lot of people said they were interested. Like 70% said they will buy and then launch day I had 40 subscribers.

Speaker 2:

Let's rewind that back. So that's really clever with your strategy about putting certain boxes in to get following. So this is kind of the piece of people I've met a lot of the time Before you launched and we kind of touched on it a bit previously. You did the work, you put together a survey and, yeah, take us true, exactly what you did.

Speaker 3:

Oh yeah. So first I called you, reached out to you crying and you can now. No, I reached out to you. You kind of like I was like all over the place. You kind of just said, hey, you broke it down in a simple way and it made so much sense after I spoke to you, test it.

Speaker 3:

So I strategically partnered for the pre-launch. I found Instagram, influencers or Facebook. I offered them a free box. I first made a mock box, which is kind of that got me in trouble. I'll talk about that later. But because I bought a whole bunch of expensive stuff and I took pictures of it and people thought that's what they were getting. So that was bad. But I'd made a mock box, I sent it to influencers photos and I asked them hey, do you mind posting this? In exchange, I'll give you a free box. I'm doing this cool project If you guys could post a survey, I'll give you guys a free box.

Speaker 3:

At that time everyone was on board. I got a lot of people to post the survey. I got about 800 people who filled out the survey. It was like a contest. All the firefighters had to do was fill out the survey for a chance to win three months of when we finally launched.

Speaker 3:

I asked a lot of questions. Again, credit to you for pointing me in the right direction. Just be strategic. Ask questions that you know. One you could find out what people want. What kind of products do you want to see All their age? Are they firefighters? Because that stuff could be targetable later when you run ads. But also asking them hey, if we launched this, would you buy it? So we asked all those questions, got 800 people to fill out the survey and once we had 800 people fill out the survey, we had about 90%, 80, 90% people say they would subscribe. Maybe they did that because they just wanted to win the contest, I don't know, but I was super excited. I thought I started over buying. I'm like my first month. I'm gonna kill it. This is 800 people. If I could have that, but launch day came and I had 40 subscribers, I might have jumped around too fast. Did I answer the question?

Speaker 2:

No, you answered the question perfectly, and getting 40 subscribers on launch day is not easy. Our first month we only got 12 people signed up, but we never did any of that stuff. We like skipped all of that stuff. I don't know why we skipped it. We kind of got excited. We saw people liking things on social media. We overestimated it as well. So we got brought back down to earth very quickly and we only had 12 people signed up. We're gone Shit. We need to figure this out. And then we did figure it out. Thankfully, within a few months we started getting open to the hundreds and down into the thousands. The key thing with the survey there was it wasn't just a survey. For the point of doing a survey, you're actually asking strategic questions. And then the killer question was would you actually buy this? They say yes, they make a micro commitment and then you follow up with them when you go live and some of them will come in.

Speaker 3:

Yes, that's 100%. I think that's huge, if any. I have a buddy who wants to start a subscription and I tell him the same thing. You got to do proof of concept first. I don't know if obviously a lot of people may not be doing it, but I think it's good and it also builds that excitement. People know something's coming. You lead, nurture up until launch. I think it's huge. People have a lot of great ideas or maybe they just target the wrong people, but you got to get the proof of concept.

Speaker 2:

It makes them feel like they're part of something too, that they're getting in early, they're feeling at the survey. You're bringing them on this journey with them. So what kind of warm-up did you do for these people when you collected the email, where you're emailing them regularly, giving them sneak peeks, things like that?

Speaker 3:

No, so that's again. I had no idea what I was doing. I didn't do much warm-up, I would just, I think, oh, what happened was, after I announced the winner of that giveaway, I let them know the estimated launch date and I gave everyone I sent out a discount. Hey, listen, you didn't win the contest for the three months, but we're launching soon, so here's 10% off. Here's 15% off the burn box subscription. So maybe that helped a little bit. I gave them a discount code for all the people who didn't win the contest, but in hindsight I wish I did a little more lead nurturing. But you don't know what you don't know.

Speaker 2:

You don't know what you don't know, especially when you're getting involved with a new business model, and so if you're only coming into an industry, it takes a bit of time to find your feet. Marketing channels right. So we move on a bit from the pre-launch. I want to get into your calling business too, before we finish up the podcast, because you actually said oh so now it sounds very impressive, but marketing channels for the burn box how do you acquire customers nowadays?

Speaker 3:

So nowadays we're running ads. What happened was so I'm still full time in the firehouse, so I did as much as I thought I could. I got my subscribers up to I think 700 subscribers by myself, but I got to a point where it was just working and it was just becoming overwhelming. You had the course. I do remember trying to on my days off trying to do the course. The course is great, but it was just a time thing. So there's a lot of great information in your course.

Speaker 3:

I'm just a one man show and I just didn't have the time being in the firehouse when your short staff 24 hour shifts. I just couldn't do it, so I looked for an agency to help. So if people I know a lot of people may not be able to afford an agency, but if they cannot afford an agency, I highly recommend your course because there's a lot of good gems in there. I still go in there from time to time and I look through the material just to like I'm doing the most I can, or just finding ideas with it to tell the agency, or even I also looked at it when I launched the second subscription that I did. Well, I'm not running a, I'm doing it all myself the second subscription, but right now the main thing is I would recommend people just try to max out as much as you can on your own before an agency, because there's a lot you could do. There's a lot you could do yourself.

Speaker 2:

The team where agencies is and there's some really great agencies out there, but you will pay for them. That's the thing. They're quite expensive to get them. I think I know the agency you are working with or we're working with Is that Steve and Harbor Marketing.

Speaker 3:

Yes, steve at Harbor Marketing. Yes, there was another podcast I listened to, I heard them and I gave them a call. They were great. They kind of broke down like an action plan and they gave you all the options and we gave it a shot and the first month it was insane. I think I went from 700 subscribers to like 1200 subscribers.

Speaker 3:

But that also poses its own challenges, right. So you don't know what you don't know. Now that I'm paying for an agency, I have to rework my numbers right. So now you're paying for customer acquisition. So I had to change the pricing of my box, because now I'm paying for ads and at the same time now I have more subscribers. My wife got tired of seeing boxes all over our living room. The kids kept putting toys in the boxes. It just got so bad. Now I have to get a fulfillment center to help me fulfill, because I was spending every week and second when I wasn't in the firehouse packing boxes. So you did now fulfillment and customer acquisition those are now new costs that I had to include in my pricing. So that's something to keep in mind when you're scaling, because you may solve one problem but might make another problem.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, 100%. If the fulfillment team is a big team for a lot of subscription box owners you kind of, you have to find a way to price them. It was the same with us, but we actually packed our own boxes. We had a warehouse for a long time and we had to change. Whoever fulfillment company now, but you have to price it in, otherwise you can find yourself in trouble when you actually go up to scale and the customer acquisition cost team as well. Shout out to Steve on Harbour Market and he was actually on this podcast a few weeks ago and I know him well very, very good marketer. To find a good agency, like I said, it's quite expensive. So many flurry buying agencies are like oh we're, we're an agency will ruin your Facebook ads, but all that actually do is set your money on fire One time products. Do you sell many one time products?

Speaker 3:

So you're going to no, I am selling them now. So at first I wasn't. But that is a huge missed opportunity and I realize it now you know. So you know if you could get a one time product or like a funnel or something upsell, that's huge. That could really. If you could have something that has low margin that you could upsell right when people are buying, it could really help your customer acquisition costs not really help our customer acquisition costs, but it can help you get profitable sooner.

Speaker 3:

You know if you have that upsell and I wish I did that sooner but right now I do have one time gifts boxes for the burn box. It's just basically a previous box. I call it legacy boxes that people can go and buy. I do have a few upsells or some products when people are checking out, but I don't sell one off products. I've grown a bit. I have some extra stock. I'm thinking about opening a burn box shop where people can just go grab one off products, but that's definitely something I need to do to maximize, you know, every channel revenue channel in my business.

Speaker 2:

A hundred percent because you have all that information and about those subscribers and they will definitely buy more things off you, whether it's add to box other subscriptions, one point products, gift boxes, they'll buy them.

Speaker 3:

I do have the gift boxes. What I've been doing is usually like any extra inventory. I just I try to offload it for Christmas as a big like gift box. That's kind of been the plan. But I don't see why I should start selling more stuff throughout the year, to be honest.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, no, yeah, they definitely agree. So things went so well with the burn box. You remember you reach out to me a few weeks ago and you're like hey, I've a new business that I've set up. So I don't know how this man finds at the time in the day. He's working in the firehouse, he has a burn box, he's married, all these things is going on. But you came out with another business and this is kind of a extension of the burn box. I believe the fire department collector is cool. Do you want to talk about FDCollector's Club dot com?

Speaker 3:

Yeah, so it's FDCollector's Club. Basically, I have the bug. I have the subscription bug. You launch one, you see a bunch, you get joined these groups. This was probably the better launch, because now I'm not starting from scratch, I'm starting from experience, you know, and it's a sickness. You're right, I don't have the time, I can't turn it off. I wish I could.

Speaker 3:

My wife is tired of hearing me here and talking about sub boxes, but I already sent products to firefighters across the United States and in my personal firehouse. People come by from Germany, from all over the world, and they ask hey, can I get a challenge coin? Can I buy your firehouse station patch? And so I did a little more research and there's Facebook groups where people just go around collecting coins and patches. So I thought, hey, why don't I become the guy? I do the legwork, I reach out to these fire departments, I negotiate the deals with the firehouse and I'll basically be the one stop shop where firefighters can get, for firefighters or just firefighter enthusiasts can get challenge coins and patches.

Speaker 3:

I launched this April. It's doing pretty well. I'm doing a more hands on approach right now with the marketing myself. Just to you know, with the last business I had no clue. I know a little bit more now and I got your course to go brush up on stuff. But yeah, it's doing really well. I'm real proud of it. I already know the clients, I already know the customers and I like the collectors club because I ship out tools every month with the burn box. But if you're like a young kid whose father was a firefighter, or you just like fire trucks, or you're a retired firefighter, you don't need tools, right. But this is still a way for you to show support without having the tools, receiving tools you won't use. You know.

Speaker 2:

It's a great idea, really good idea. I love the way it's like a niche within a niche. It's like getting down even further. Really unique and business Is there much crossover between the two of them? Do you get people so you can look for both, or foils first, or because that's a way to fight your acquisition cost and lowers?

Speaker 3:

Yes, I did notice when I did that. So first, when I did my launch again, I wasn't starting from zero, I was starting. I had a base already. So I kind of restyle to my existing customers already, let them know something's coming. Do another pre-launch, do another test, do not another survey, see how many people will be interested. Price point, ask strategic questions. You could use things like look likes audiences from all the people who are opting in. Again, I joined a lot of groups. It was I do have. I probably have a third of the subscribers, maybe a little less than a third, that are better subscribed to the Collectors Club. It was very good.

Speaker 2:

I imagine what would work well for you. It's really clever, like kind of establishing their business and coming up with another business that you can like funnel from what you've done from the original business into it. You may do this already post-purchase upsets and stuff. So in the burn box one of the post-purchase upsets could be this and in the coin subscription the post-purchase upsets could be the burn box. Do you do that?

Speaker 3:

No, I'm writing that down. No, I haven't done that, but that's actually, I don't know. For some reason I was trying to keep everything separate. I had this thing. It's a terrible habit of mine. I think things are going to crash and burn, so I wanted to keep the club separate because I didn't know how well it's going to do. But it's been about six months, it's doing really well. I think we've got about 500 people signed up and so, yeah, I think I might start doing that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's clever because they may not be the exact customers, but there's definitely crossover there. We have a few different subscriptions that we offer in the post-purchase. Now they're all sent out of the round booster box. Funny story I have for you is we were actually ready to set up a cat box last year and we did. We actually did all the work on it. Like we literally came up with the name I think it was called the jingyboxcom.

Speaker 2:

We've done a lot of work on this cat box and right at the last moment we never went ahead with it because something else came open. It would have taken up time and resources, but the way we were thinking about it was if they have a dog and they have a cat and they're signing up for a dog box, they probably don't want to leave the cat out, and same with the cat and fights versa. But yeah, definitely, definitely a good way. We did something similar as well with dogfield and we had that in the post-purchase and people were taking that. So you're essentially paying the acquisition cost once, but you may be getting essentially two subscribers because they're buying both subscriptions.

Speaker 3:

Listen, maybe it's because I'm a sub box owner man. Subscription boxes are like I don't know man, it's like correct me if I'm wrong, you've been doing it way longer than me and I hope I'm not. I think if you can find something that people are passionate about, I think you could make something really special in a subscription box world. If you could find a passion, you could provide value. I think the potential is like limitless man. I'm super excited.

Speaker 3:

I have the bug I have to constantly I write down other subscription box ideas. I have to write it down and put it away because I don't want to go down that rabbit hole. But I do have one thing to say about the Collectors Club. It's going well and I'm super happy about it. If I could go back, I may just wait it because I think there's still a lot of potential in the burn box that I didn't unlock. So for anyone thinking about hey, just starting new, before you start new, maybe just do what you're doing better. So maybe just make sure, like I know, I could do a set up a referral program, I know, maybe finding some affiliates, maybe do a little more emails and stuff like that. So if I can go back. Maybe there's still a lot I can unlock in the burn box is what I'm trying to say.

Speaker 2:

So yeah, yeah, well, that's exactly what you did. You found something that people are really passionate about and you came up with a really good product to fill the niche. And yeah, I agree with you definitely, if you're only in the stage where there's still a good bit more to go with your business like there's opportunity to reach a bigger market or whatever you're probably better off putting the head down and focusing on that, and that's something I've learned big time this year. Focus is so important. It's really, really important. You have like a million different things going on, but if you're not able to dedicate your time to them properly, they don't actually go anywhere.

Speaker 3:

Yeah Well, hopefully I don't have to run in burning buildings anymore. You know, soon, pretty soon, I could relax and I could focus on more.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I remember you said you're picturing. You're like, yeah, I was in that bit last night. That is, yeah, I think we're good.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, I was like I'm sorry I couldn't get back to you.

Speaker 2:

I was a little busy and any advice for a new subscription box for dealing with a supplier or suppliers in general?

Speaker 3:

So I'll admit that that's something a pain point for me. Just if I had advice, I would say just make a script and just reach out to as many people as you can. I always had a hard time with negotiating prices because my original business model was to reach out to firefighter owned companies. But these firefighters are guys just like me making stuff in their garage. They don't have the margin state, so it is trying to get. My margins are very tight, especially in beginning for products. So but if you're depending on your niche, you might be able to really just negotiate. It'd probably be easier negotiating with some of these bigger companies. But I would say just make a script, send it out and just send out. Just try to send out a lot and in volume, because you, if you send out enough, you get enough people to give you the price you're looking for.

Speaker 2:

You know, thanks, that's what's really good advice and I'm sure the listeners will appreciate that One for your question before we got you out. So now you're a very you're a very busy man and you've great metrics in your business. I remember saying before really good churning and stuff. What do you do before you turn?

Speaker 3:

What do I do for the turn? I'd be honest, I just try to provide as much value as I can. Also, I think good customer service is huge as well. I find that even if something goes wrong and you reply to people quick enough and you provide a remedy quick enough, they're usually really happy about it. I think I'm fortunate enough, a lot of people who are fine and just want to be better, fine and they're just happy to be a part of something. I think it's a bit of a niche. I think just a clientele who sign up are just usually really passionate people. I think customer service and just trying to remedy things quickly and being very responsive and trying to provide as much value as you can, I think it goes a long way, because the game is lifetime value. That's the game. That's what you're really looking for. Just make sure you keep people on board as long as possible.

Speaker 2:

Thank you. You said something really important there and I think it's key Response time, how quick you actually get back to people if there is an issue. If you don't get back to people quickly, problems can escalate, Whereas if you have the process and place, just get in touch, sort the issue and you'll keep them happy.

Speaker 3:

My wife kind of helps me with customer service right now. It's great because I know people have you could hire staff and stuff. But with my wife going right now at least right now we haven't gotten too big where she could stop. They like that personal touch.

Speaker 2:

Well, look, thanks very much for coming on. I really appreciate it. You dropped a lot of wisdom there that I'm sure people will get a lot of value from. If any of the listeners want to reach out, where can they find you?

Speaker 3:

Oh, I'm in the Facebook group. You find me. It's not Thomas Ansel, but it's Thomas Kwame. You could just send me a message and I'll reply, or you can shoot an email over to thomas at theburnboxcom. I'm a regular dude man. If I'll answer, I'll give any advice I can. I kind of subscription boxes have become my life. I kind of love talking about this stuff. I can nerd out about it all day. But yeah, and I wish everyone the best of luck, If you could unlock a profitable subscription box company, I think the world is your oyster.

Speaker 2:

If Rigi is, you have that recurring revenue and it can really change your life. But look, thanks again. I really appreciate it. We will be back next week at the exact same time. The Subscription Box Experts Academy is opening on October 25th. The entire course has been revamped with new information. It's ready to basically help you take your business to the next level. And if you want to join, make sure you head over and join the waitlist at subscriptionboxexpertscom, because it will only be open to 50 businesses. Thanks very much for listening. If you have a question want answered on the show, head over to subscriptionboxresourcescom, join the free Facebook group and post it there. We'll be back next week at the exact same time. Have a great day, bye-bye.

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