What we lose in the Shadows (A father and daughter True Crime Podcast)

Dodging Justice: The Dark Tale of Drew Peterson

November 21, 2023 Jameson Keys & Caroline Season 1 Episode 31
Dodging Justice: The Dark Tale of Drew Peterson
What we lose in the Shadows (A father and daughter True Crime Podcast)
More Info
What we lose in the Shadows (A father and daughter True Crime Podcast)
Dodging Justice: The Dark Tale of Drew Peterson
Nov 21, 2023 Season 1 Episode 31
Jameson Keys & Caroline

Want to know how a man eluded justice amidst a trail of suspicious activities and chilling criminal behavior? Imagine a tale of power, corruption, and murder that unfolds the dark mysteries surrounding the disappearance of Stacey Peterson and the controversial death of Kathleen Savio, with their husband, Drew Peterson, at the center of this storm. Join us as we explore a gripping narrative that reveals Peterson's history of domestic abuse and his manipulations, using his status as a police officer to dodge the law.

We go beyond the headlines, examining the unsettling circumstances surrounding Kathleen Savio's death, which was initially ruled as an accident despite compelling evidence suggesting foul play. We scrutinize the blatant police corruption in Will County and the role it played in shielding Peterson. Stacey Peterson's tragic tale and her son Steven's suspicion of his own father further paints a chilling picture that will leave you questioning the justice system. 

Our investigation doesn't stop there. We dive deep into Drew Peterson's pattern of narcissistic behavior and his alleged torment of his fourth wife, Stacey. Hear the shocking details of his attempt to hire a contract killer and Stacey's chilling confession to her pastor, Reverend Neil Schory. This episode promises to leave you gripped, as we dissect a chilling tale of a man who, for too long, managed to cloak his sinister actions under the guise of law enforcement. Tune in, listen closely, and let's decipher this complex web of corruption and injustice together.

Fox 32 Chicago Stacy Peterson's disappearance 15 years later 10-27-22
NBC News So what happened to Stacy Peterson? 9-6-2012
NBC News Ex-Cop found guilty of murdering third wife. 9-6-2012

Contact us at: whatweloseintheshadows@gmail.com



Background music by Michael Shuller Music

Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Want to know how a man eluded justice amidst a trail of suspicious activities and chilling criminal behavior? Imagine a tale of power, corruption, and murder that unfolds the dark mysteries surrounding the disappearance of Stacey Peterson and the controversial death of Kathleen Savio, with their husband, Drew Peterson, at the center of this storm. Join us as we explore a gripping narrative that reveals Peterson's history of domestic abuse and his manipulations, using his status as a police officer to dodge the law.

We go beyond the headlines, examining the unsettling circumstances surrounding Kathleen Savio's death, which was initially ruled as an accident despite compelling evidence suggesting foul play. We scrutinize the blatant police corruption in Will County and the role it played in shielding Peterson. Stacey Peterson's tragic tale and her son Steven's suspicion of his own father further paints a chilling picture that will leave you questioning the justice system. 

Our investigation doesn't stop there. We dive deep into Drew Peterson's pattern of narcissistic behavior and his alleged torment of his fourth wife, Stacey. Hear the shocking details of his attempt to hire a contract killer and Stacey's chilling confession to her pastor, Reverend Neil Schory. This episode promises to leave you gripped, as we dissect a chilling tale of a man who, for too long, managed to cloak his sinister actions under the guise of law enforcement. Tune in, listen closely, and let's decipher this complex web of corruption and injustice together.

Fox 32 Chicago Stacy Peterson's disappearance 15 years later 10-27-22
NBC News So what happened to Stacy Peterson? 9-6-2012
NBC News Ex-Cop found guilty of murdering third wife. 9-6-2012

Contact us at: whatweloseintheshadows@gmail.com



Background music by Michael Shuller Music

Speaker 1:

Good morning and welcome to what we Lose in the Shadows.

Speaker 2:

A Father Daughter True Crime Podcast.

Speaker 1:

My name is Jameson Keyes.

Speaker 2:

I'm Caroline. Good morning everyone and good morning dad.

Speaker 1:

Good morning Carabair. How are you?

Speaker 2:

I'm doing well.

Speaker 1:

Very good, you know.

Speaker 2:

What.

Speaker 1:

You're going on a little trip soon, which is cool.

Speaker 2:

I am. I'm about to travel to Cancun and I'm really excited about it.

Speaker 1:

And after that we're really close to the holidays and have a little turkey. I love Thanksgiving. It's one of my favorite holidays. I love Christmas, obviously, but I love Thanksgiving too, because you know you get some things that are kind of sweet and some things you normally eat during the year. It's true, I like Grandma's noodles, for example. That's something you want to enjoy when you have it, but eat in very, very small quantities.

Speaker 2:

Literally, and my favorite is Green Bean Cosserl. So I'm really excited to eat that we're going to make it. My girlfriend actually made it from scratch last year which do you remember that? No, it was delicious. You don't remember? Wow, I remember. Oh, yes, I do. Yes, I do.

Speaker 1:

It was so good. See, that's not one of the things I make. Well, green Bean Cosserl no, it's not one of my fortes.

Speaker 2:

I made it all from scratch. I'd never had it from scratch. She sautéed the mushrooms and made it into a cream, and then fresh green beans, everything. It was so good and she had never made it either. She'd never had it before.

Speaker 1:

Wow.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, she had never eaten it before. She was like I don't know what that is.

Speaker 1:

I don't know what that is, but I'm going to make some.

Speaker 2:

No, because I told her. I was like I want this, I want this to be made. She was like okay, then I'll make it. She was so sweet about it. Wow, that's great, it was a good time. She's such a sweet herb.

Speaker 1:

Very good.

Speaker 2:

So our mornings today are domestic violence and murder.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely. And, katelyn, we're going to talk about something that it's a little older crime, but it's kind of something we know very well because a number of years ago we lived in the Chicago Island area and we lived kind of in the same spot and we've talked about Lisa Stebik before because that disappearance actually happened in the same town we lived in.

Speaker 2:

I remember growing up looking at these things. It was crazy.

Speaker 1:

And about the same time, just a few months later, a young lady named Stacey Peterson disappeared as well. St Mary, right. St Mary, about 20 miles, 15 miles away, right, and it's been 16 years since anyone last saw Stacey Peterson alive, and her husband, drew Peterson, is, and always has been, the prime suspect, but no charges have ever been filed.

Speaker 2:

As they always are.

Speaker 1:

It's been 19 years since the death of Kathleen Savio, and Kathleen was the third wife of Peterson. And on March 1, 2004, savio, who had just recently divorced Peterson, drowned in her bathtub, despite the fact that when the police found her, there was no water in the bathtub. What the hell Weirdly Peterson had? He kind of demonstrated this same thing happening over and over him, this trend right Of his wife's dying. Well, his wife. He was married for the first time and his first wife. They started off well, and then he started having problems, he started cheating and then they divorced and that led into the second wife. The same thing happened and they led into a divorce Once again. What this dude, this ass, would do is he would go out, he would find another woman and then just kind of push the last wife kind of beside.

Speaker 2:

I think it's so interesting because in this situation you know that he was like oh, it's not me, it's the other women, it's always the other women, right? It's so funny that his warped thinking is like it's never me, I'm not the problem, you know what I mean, but he just keeps cycling through women.

Speaker 1:

Now Peterson, for his part, demonstrated some things in common with all these ladies he actually abused all of them. That's horrible, absolutely. He's been a cop for a long time and he's proved it ever since as well. But there were many, many times during this career and he was first. He was in the military right when he first got married to his first wife. He came out and became a police officer and he'd been that police officer for quite some number of years, but he was abusing people.

Speaker 1:

He was a serial abuser. That's horrible. The only reason I can never think that he you know this never came to a head. He wasn't disciplined or anything like that.

Speaker 2:

Oh it was because he was a cop.

Speaker 1:

Because he was a cop, yeah, and there's just a little bit of, you know, professional courtesy. I guess they would try to say that's what it was.

Speaker 2:

I think professional courtesy is like oh, you were going two miles over, okay, whatever. But right.

Speaker 1:

Covering up whole crimes is definitely not a professional courtesy no I agree, but that's pretty much what happened, and even in Stacey Peterson's case they had been to the house like 14 or 18 times on domestic violence problems. So this was not just a you know, a sometimes thing. This was a pattern of behavior for this dude.

Speaker 2:

And just to be clear, even if abuse is a sometimes thing, always horrible, Anyone who lays their hands on you get out.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely so. When, when Savio was first found, and the way it happened was odd too. This is the third wife. This is the third wife, Right, and the way it happened was really odd too, because he had claimed he was calling her and calling her and calling her and that that he went over. Even though he had a key to the house. He was forced to move out, Right.

Speaker 2:

Oh, okay, so she had already served him papers like get out.

Speaker 1:

She had already served him papers, she had already told him you know they've been fighting and so on and she said she wanted access, full access to the children, she wanted the house and she wanted part of his pension. So that was enough, apparently, to trigger this psychopath, to do something about it. But in the meantime he had started dating, you know, stacey, and Stacey was all of 16 years old at the time he started. How? Old is he? He's in his forties or fifties.

Speaker 2:

Ew, so this is a pedophile as well. Yeah, pretty much Damn. I forgot to put that in the trigger warning. I'll try and go back and add it.

Speaker 1:

So, so, yeah, so he'd already started dating Stacey. He bought a house just down the road from the other house, right, which is creepy in and of itself.

Speaker 2:

I mean it's obviously like an abuse tactic. Like I'm still in control of you, you're not going to get me out of your life, like I'm here, there's nothing you can do about it. You probably wanted her to sell the house.

Speaker 1:

Right, so he could get money Right or move out or move out yeah. Right, and we've seen that at different times when this kind of a scenario has popped up, that the husband tries to maneuver and force the wife and to right to sell the house or you're not going to be able to afford this, so you might as well just move out.

Speaker 1:

But yeah, so he actually bought a house not far from this house. On the day that they found Kathleen he had been calling her and then he went over, even though he had a key to the house. He said he got some of the neighbors and he said you know, I'm worried that there's something wrong. I've been trying to call her and you know, but I didn't want to use my key because I didn't want to upset her and that kind of thing. So could you come in with me?

Speaker 2:

That's so suspicious how contrived is that. Yeah, that is so suspicious, like, first of all, how long had he been calling her Just the day?

Speaker 1:

He said he had called her the day before and he could never get a hold of her.

Speaker 2:

Okay, but like if you're getting divorced, like you would give it a few days, like you're not the first point of contact that needs to be worrying about, like your spouse. You know what I mean. Like it's kind of weird, like did he contact her parents? You know what I mean. Like it's just like it seems like he's like well, I called her the day before and like what so simple of a plan that he came up with that he thought he could just sweep under the rug.

Speaker 1:

Right. And so he brings the neighbors in and walks them upstairs. He's like, oh wow, I'm worried that she's, you know, harmed herself or something like that. And he goes up so suspicious, leads them to the bathroom and that's where they find her in the bathtub Right, and you know, oh my gosh, she drowned. You know? Just a ridiculous scenario, a ridiculous.

Speaker 2:

What the?

Speaker 1:

hell Right.

Speaker 2:

Why would he lead them to the bathroom?

Speaker 1:

He looked around downstairs, but eventually, I guess, he let him upstairs. It's ridiculous. And authorities ruled that Salvia's bathtub death was an accident, even though they found her body with extensive bruising and a gash on her head. What that's, you know? That's just extensive.

Speaker 2:

How do you get bruised? Like, okay, if you fall, have a gash on your head in the bathtub. I can see that. Where's the bruising?

Speaker 1:

So here's the thing. Maybe it didn't have the bruising at first. Oh, that's true. But in post-mortem the bruising tends to show up, and what they noticed was there was bruising around her neck, her shoulders.

Speaker 2:

How would that? Happen I mean what the hell?

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so so it's just. It was just such a weird scenario, but they said they ruled it as an accident.

Speaker 2:

Ridiculous. That's actually ridiculous. Absolutely what year was this 2007, 2008.

Speaker 2:

Okay, wow, that's really sad because, you know you, you think like, oh, in the early 2000s, like you know, we didn't have as much like corrupt police work and as much like covering up for like good old boys in the you know what I mean Like that's crazy that it was still happening into like I don't know. Like it, just when we talk about cases that are like from the 1960s, I'm like, oh yeah, definitely you know they were doing this, but like now, even like what, less than 20 years ago it's disturbing.

Speaker 1:

But you know, I mean, if you think back though, we did that, that video on her, that recording on the missing women of Will County, yep, I mean it's kind of rampant there, I mean yeah, it does seem like that specific area is extra corrupt. Yeah, Do you remember the lady that was?

Speaker 1:

she was a deputy sheriff and they had Robin yeah, they had just done so many weird things and you know said, you know put threw her in jail with you know convicts and you know with male convicts, yeah, and then put her like like she had like over a hundred you know different citations and so on, which just just for not liking a man who was married right.

Speaker 2:

Not that it matters, Like it doesn't matter if the guy's married or not, but like I mean, why the what? Oh gosh.

Speaker 1:

So the one the one thing is, when Stacy disappeared it kind of triggered people that they couldn't, they couldn't, you know, kind of look away from this anymore.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, because he had two, two, two out of four, that's half half of his wives. Right Right Went missing or died mysteriously. Exactly, so what an idiot thinking he could get away with that twice Ridiculous.

Speaker 1:

So authorities exhumed her body in 2007 and in 2009,. They indicted Drew Peterson for her death.

Speaker 2:

That's great.

Speaker 1:

They convicted him of Savio's murder in 2012.

Speaker 2:

Took a long time, but yeah it did it did.

Speaker 1:

It took a long time, but my God you know, if Stacy never disappears, do they ever go back and start looking at it?

Speaker 2:

They would not. No, they wouldn't. I think it would be. I think if there was, like the right detective, that was like maybe putting pieces together somehow, possibly but I think it's a very slim chance and I do think even if, like the right detective was looking back on that case, I think people would be like don't even touch that, just don't even touch that. You know, people would try to persuade them. Be like no, it's under the right leg, don't just, we have so much like honor. They would try to convince them. You know what I mean.

Speaker 1:

Sure, that would make everyone look bad. If you dig this up, it's going to make us all look bad because we didn't see it or turned our blind eye to it or whatever, or allow the abuse to continue to happen, which kind of creates this kind of avalanche of bad things. Then someone has it in their idea that I can get away with anything, exactly.

Speaker 2:

Because, literally, I mean, it was such an obvious death. I mean, how do you have strangle marks on your neck from falling in the shower? What the hell? It's ridiculous. And it wasn't even full of water, right? Why would he let?

Speaker 1:

out the water. They did find water in her lungs.

Speaker 2:

Oh they did.

Speaker 1:

They did, but there's some conjecture and people are thinking that they came up with the thought that, basically, what he had done is he had drowned her in the toilet. That's so horrible and the fingerprints on her neck and so on and the wounds and so on is kind of in common with the fact that someone would have forced her down from behind and they think he drowned her in the toilet put her in the bathtub.

Speaker 2:

That's so disgusting. I mean it's always interesting, just like how low people are willing to go because like that, like on a mental level, you know what I mean is just so degrading, right To put, like someone who you claim to have love's head in a toilet and drown them.

Speaker 1:

But remember it's shocking. She, unlike maybe the first two wives and I don't know the particulars about the first two marriages, but unlike those two, this woman was a fighter, Kathleen was. She was a fighter and she let him know in no uncertain terms that she was expecting that property and part of his pension, and I think that is what threw him over the edge.

Speaker 2:

I mean, it seems like he was already on the edge, like already over the edge by like abusing people, but like, I think, her trying to make him pay for what he did. He just doesn't like the fact that consequences come with his actions.

Speaker 1:

No, absolutely not, Absolutely not.

Speaker 2:

But my thing but my thing is is like had the Will County Police Department and whoever else was involved with this medical bowling broke police department. Okay, oh, I thought you said well County there it's all in will County. Okay.

Speaker 1:

But bowling broke is the police department.

Speaker 2:

Okay, that was the police department for Kathleen staff. So so.

Speaker 1:

So in that area you have different jurisdictions. Plainfield has a police department, bowlingbrook has a police department. Right Napierville has a police department. Will County is not on top of them, will County, is a sheriff's office. So they they, you know fit in and they have different jurisdictional things and they kind of cover things and overlap in some areas.

Speaker 2:

Okay, so the bowlingbrook police department the bowlingbrook police department is, that's who sucked it out of the rug.

Speaker 1:

Well, who?

Speaker 2:

yes, I mean literally, right, yeah, absolutely, I mean you know, and the medical examiner, whether they were forced to or convinced to, or like who knows, who knows, who knows. However, someone played a part in this, multiple people definitely played a part in this, and they should be held accountable for Stacey Peterson, right, because she wouldn't she probably would not have been with him had she known that he was a murderer. Right, you know what I mean. Like they had investigated Kathleen's properly and how they were supposed to do in the first place their literal job.

Speaker 1:

She probably still be alive.

Speaker 2:

She would still be alive and she would literally be, you know, growing old, enjoying her life with her family and children.

Speaker 1:

And had they taken his stupid ass away, you know, all four would probably still be alive.

Speaker 2:

Yep, that's yeah, exactly had they taken the domestic violence situations clear. But I, you know that's the tough thing with domestic violence, because our laws do not do justice for the abusers. You know what I mean. Like they do not like put them away into jail for long enough, they don't like put it on their record sometimes, like it depends. It depends on what happens. So the reason that I say that is because I took my ex-boyfriend to court for sending out like ridiculous things. You know what I mean. Like he just he was really vindictive really manipulative.

Speaker 2:

He was like sharing content he wasn't supposed to, and that's a form of domestic violence. Did they put it down like that? No, do you know what I mean? Like literally, the way our legal system works. It doesn't work towards the victim's favor. It doesn't work towards the victim's favor, and it's not. They don't hold abusers accountable in the way that they should be. So for murder, they do Most of the time, not even all the time, but most of the time. But for domestic violence, like? I mean, obviously he had all of these. Did they even give him citations for the police were called to his place for his first, second and third wife? I believe so. Domestic violence, I believe so In domestic violence situations. So had they taken those seriously, right, literally both of them would still be alive.

Speaker 1:

Right. Although Stacey Peterson's body's never been found, she is presumed dead. Despite speculation from many people, including high profile prosecutor Marsha Clark, no charges were ever filed against Drew for allegedly killing Stacey.

Speaker 2:

That's horrible. That's so horrible.

Speaker 1:

So Peterson was allegedly, you know, highly controlling and abusive with Stacey. He has also been with all these other wives, including Salvia.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so it's not alleged. I mean, at this point, you know, a pattern is a pattern.

Speaker 1:

Stacey reportedly feared him and she'd been planning to tell him that she wanted to separate shortly before her disappearance. Plus, stacey knew a little too much about Salvia's death. Namely, she knew that her husband wasn't home at the time it happened, and he had reportedly coached Stacey to give a false alibi, stating that he was home on that night.

Speaker 2:

That's horrible.

Speaker 1:

Now Peterson was sentenced to 38 years in prison for killing Salvia, and his stupidity doesn't stop there.

Speaker 2:

Of course not.

Speaker 1:

While he was in prison, he was very, very upset with state attorney Jim Glasgow of Will County.

Speaker 2:

For putting him away for his crimes. Yes, so the consequences of his actions, exactly OK.

Speaker 1:

The former cops involvement raised questions, particularly regarding the disappearance of his fourth wife, Stacey. While he was in jail, Drew Peterson tried to hire a contract killer to kill Glasgow.

Speaker 2:

Wow, that is. I just don't know why he thought I mean, this is obviously, he's obviously a narcissist, because he really thought he was going to get away with that. He's a psychopath.

Speaker 1:

I mean that too, but like those two things often go hand in hand, right they do.

Speaker 2:

Like obviously, yes, he's a psychopath because he's willing and Kill people yeah, willing to kill people, doesn't care about consequences or their feelings or emotions. But also a narcissist is for thinking he could get away with that.

Speaker 1:

So he approaches this gang member in prison, right, and he starts talking to the guy and he says you know, I understand that you're someone that can possibly do something on the outside. And the guy understands what he's asking him. So he goes to the authorities and said, listen, good for him, I don't want any part of this. Now, did they offer him or do sentence? Did they do something else? I don't know and I don't care. I think, well, it depends on why he's there. Well, true, but I mean still, at least he had the presence of mind to go.

Speaker 2:

No, I'm not doing this. I'm not doing this, literally. I don't want to continue to be in here. I'm not doing this, not for your ass.

Speaker 1:

He goes, he wears a wire and he leads Peterson down the path there. And even though this guy's been a cop Idiot, he doesn't see it coming. He makes.

Speaker 2:

Because he's a narcissist. He thinks, oh, everyone loves me. They would never do that, right? What an idiot.

Speaker 1:

So then he gets another 40 years on top of his 37 years. That makes me happy For trying to kill, you know.

Speaker 2:

I'm happy, and you know what? Here's the thing he deserves to be in there forever.

Speaker 1:

He does, he honestly does, he honestly does. During the trial, one of the witnesses, who was a Reverend, reverend Neil Scory, who was Stacy Peters and his pastor, claimed that she was absolutely terrified and she told him I live with a murderer. Wow, that is quite the confession, so you would think this dude would at least listen. You're never getting out of jail, no matter what. You're never getting out of jail, right? So you think he would give the family some semblance? Oh no, something. He doesn't care, he doesn't care.

Speaker 2:

And you know, once people are caught in a lie, they will never go back on it. They're like double down, 10 toes down. Don't want to admit that they were wrong or admit that they did something that they have already set up in their head as like no, I didn't do that, even though they know they did. He will never give that up.

Speaker 1:

So Nancy Grace and Dan Abrams interviewed Joe Broski, and Joe Broski was Peterson's former lawyer. He claims to know about Stacey's fate Wow. Unfortunately, he refused to offer the details Sticky, and you know, drew, of course, is not talking about this. So what exactly happened to her right? Peterson, for his part, has always claimed that Stacey told him or called him and said that she was leaving him for another man, but no records have ever come forth to show that's the case.

Speaker 2:

And even if she was, what does that even like? Why is that even part of this?

Speaker 1:

Well, she said, he says that she's not dead.

Speaker 2:

Oh, she just ran away with the other one.

Speaker 1:

Now, do you notice that? Do you remember back in the Lisa Stabic case as well?

Speaker 2:

Did he?

Speaker 1:

say that he said exactly the same thing. What?

Speaker 2:

an idiot.

Speaker 1:

She's probably, you know, she probably hooked up with some other dude and just left right.

Speaker 2:

Because that's what you would do, that's what they're thinking. They're like well, if I were to go missing, I probably wouldn't be missing.

Speaker 1:

I'd probably just be with another woman, Like do you know another weird part about this whole thing? Now? Lisa Stabic disappeared a few months before Stacey. One of the things that was weird to everyone was the fact that she left all her belongings behind. She left all her money, her cell phone.

Speaker 1:

Because he did it Because he did it, but he was saying, you know, I don't know why she must have just left with another guy. Honestly, I think Peterson was watching this case from afar. That's horrifying, because he claimed that she took money out of the bank and she took some things along with her, and so I honestly think he was watching saying oh, that's a good point.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

I mean, I think he's that deluded that he was watching that case and I'll have to fix that when I give my alibi right.

Speaker 2:

And my favorite part of these cases is when these stupid criminals get caught and they're like how could this have happened? I'm so smart, Guess you're not Literally have fun rotting in jail. This is ridiculous, so stupid. That's what you get for putting your hands on your partner Never OK.

Speaker 1:

Right Stacey was 23 at the time of her disappearance.

Speaker 2:

That is so sad.

Speaker 1:

October 28th of 2007.

Speaker 2:

Literally many years younger than me. That's crazy, absolutely Poor thing.

Speaker 1:

And after she failed to show up at her sister's house and they were going to do some painting, you know, drew Peterson said he had spoken to her that night, claiming that she told him she was leaving, like I said, for another man. During a television interview on the Today Show, peterson claimed that Stacey would regularly request a divorce, which he believed you're going to love. This, he believed, was connected with her menstrual cycle.

Speaker 2:

I don't even know what to say to that. I've never heard of divorce via menstrual cycle. Like I'm so confused what he thought he was doing with that. He was like, wow, what worked. When I was a child, my dad would just tell my mom that she was being crazy because she was on her period. Oh, I'll just use that, what Right?

Speaker 1:

And he's probably thinking, OK, 50% of the juror will be men, They'll go. Oh yeah, I am. I want to be a little crazy, but what?

Speaker 2:

the hell. Literally, that is so irritating. So what is his excuse? I would love to know, because I know he probably doesn't have a menstrual cycle. So what's his excuse for going off the rails sometimes? Must be his menstrual cycle, like, come on, what the hell. I love how people just assume like, oh, she's just having a bad day, must be her menstrual cycle. Well, maybe she's just a human having a bad day.

Speaker 1:

Right, absolutely so. Stacey's sister actually reported her missing, but no one knew why she disappeared. Former captain of the Illinois State Police found it really strange, knowing everything that he knew about Stacey, that she would leave her children, exactly Because Stacey was not only raising her children, she was also raising the children of Kathleen Salve.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah.

Speaker 1:

So he kills the mother, has these two children, brings him into this blended then family with her children, with a young mother, which is fine.

Speaker 2:

If that's your choice, that's your choice, right. But that's a lot of pressure for her For sure, like it's not just her kids, it's also her stepchildren. How many like that's so many kids?

Speaker 1:

Right, that is so many kids. I think it was four children she was raising at that time and she actually apparently was a good mother. She was very concerned about them and you know how when you're young, you're full of energy and so on. I'm sure she was a good mother.

Speaker 2:

Oh, I'm sure she was. No, young mothers are great, but like that's a lot to throw on somebody For sure. Stepchildren in general, like that's just that's a lot. And what did he think was going to happen? He was going to find another woman, have two more kids with that woman and then she was going to take care of the other four. Like I mean, what the hell?

Speaker 1:

At the time he was arrested, he was actually engaged to marry yet another woman.

Speaker 2:

Wow, I mean, that's a lot. I think that's the trend that it would have happened. I think he would have had two more children with the next wife and then she would have just been watching. All six children Would have happened again Two more children with the next wife. They would have had eight children. Like, come on, what the hell.

Speaker 1:

Well, and he told both Stacy and he told Kathleen Salvio, according to some of her family, that he had told both of them. Don't give me problems, because I could kill you and I could get away with it.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah, abusive people do that all the time. They threaten lives, of course, and you know, leaving an abusive person, that is one of the most dangerous times in an abusive relationship, which is why oftentimes, like these non-profits or shelters or women support groups, domestic violence groups, suggest that you like, move in with other people or suggest that you kind of go like under the radar situation.

Speaker 1:

Well there, are some groups, as I remember, that are so they're fairly serious about. They're like you need to leave now. You need to leave everything behind. Yeah, you need to basically just come with us and we're going to put you in a new life and you're going to start a new life. And this is why, Right, and this is why.

Speaker 2:

Because people who are in abusive relationships don't see it as a partnership. They see it as like ownership, like you're mine, and if you're not mine, then you don't deserve to live. That's the thought process, right? It's scary as hell.

Speaker 1:

Right, absolutely, absolutely. So I feel really bad for his kids, all of his kids, oh my God. Yeah, drew Peterson's son, steven, strongly suspects that his father was involved in her death. Yeah, Stating in 2017 that he's certain that his father did it. That's so sad. He also told the paper that Stacey had seemed afraid of Drew after Salvio's death.

Speaker 2:

I would be too, that's terrifying.

Speaker 1:

But he didn't notice it at the time because he's kind of a younger guy.

Speaker 2:

Well, yeah, of course, and like kids, if you put them in any situation, they won't think it's weird, because they have nothing to compare it to.

Speaker 1:

Right. And he's like looking back now and he's thinking, right, he's thinking, oh my God, there's so many signs, how did I miss those signs? Because he's not a psychopath, right. And here's the other thing he took all four of those children, steven, yeah, the other children from the different ones, oh so the three Right, because their mothers are dead. Yep, murdered the fathers in jail, murderer, murderer, wow. And he's been raising all those kids.

Speaker 2:

Wow, that is a beautiful. Wow, that's really beautiful.

Speaker 1:

But the terrible thing is he looks just like Drew Peterson. He sounds just like Drew Peterson.

Speaker 2:

Well, I mean there's nothing criminal about you know. Looking like someone who was a horrible person.

Speaker 1:

Like.

Speaker 2:

I know that's really tough for some people, like if they have parents who are like criminals, especially like violent criminals. But you know there really should not be any shame because you can't feel shame for the acts of, like, your parents. That just doesn't work that way. You know what I mean. Like I understand why people would feel that way, but that's definitely like that's definitely something you have to like work through with, like therapy and stuff, because it's not your fault that your parents were horrible. You know what I mean. Not that his parents were, his dad was, but either way, like I've heard in other cases too, like it's tough to look like someone who hurt you and your loved ones.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely, absolutely. Thomas Morphy, who is Drew Peterson's stepbrother, said he helped Drew Peterson move a large plastic container out of the bedroom the day after Stacy disappeared.

Speaker 2:

That's horrifying, right. Okay, so that's obviously where she is Right. Where did he? He doesn't know where it went.

Speaker 1:

He just helped him load it into the car. He has no idea where he took it. Then there are a lot of I can't believe there's a lot of canals there's. There's Lake Michigan, there's a lot of different places that this guy could have hid this. They need to drag those, I agree.

Speaker 2:

I agree, but I'm surprised I haven't already.

Speaker 1:

But Morphy said he told a newspaper. He said I think I helped Drew Peterson to dispose of Stacy Horrible and it's affected this poor guy so much he tried to commit suicide.

Speaker 2:

This is why therapy is so important when you have traumatic life events Like and this is on an extreme like spectrum, of course, but even even small traumatic like life events, like there's no shame in going and talking about your feelings with someone, because feelings and emotions are really intense. They can be really, really intense.

Speaker 1:

Right.

Speaker 2:

And therapy and you know professionals help. Mental health professionals really are very helpful with you know reframing things and giving you coping tools, because this kind of stuff is so unnatural for us to do, like to experience as humans. You know it's not, it's not fair to us to have to like live with that on our own. So I hope that if anyone out there is struggling like with their mental health, like please go get therapy and I know it can be really expensive, I know that but they do have like crisis help lines if you ever need anything, because these feelings will pass, they always will pass. And you know trauma, trauma happens and you have to. You have to get like good coping mechanisms. You have to find like support systems.

Speaker 1:

We talked about ripple effects before. Right, right, think about this dude. He's like a human flamethrower, right? I mean, kill these two women. He tried to kill that district attorney, right.

Speaker 2:

That's insane.

Speaker 1:

How would you like to go around being known as the son, daughter or a?

Speaker 2:

true peer have to go to therapy?

Speaker 1:

Yeah for sure, and all those things. This, his step, you know, his step brother tries to commit suicide. I mean, he's just, he's like radioactive man, he's.

Speaker 2:

You know, it's just a lot of people are, though, a lot of people we've discussed, a lot of people we haven't even discussed or even know about, or crimes that have not been, you know, solved. Like there's so many people that spread like horrible, wicked vibes, like you know what I mean, like it's just, it's so, it's so sad, and I think, just like one big takeaway is always follow your gut. You know what I mean, because, like we see all these signs you know what I mean, we see all these signs in other people, and it's like, if you get a bad feeling from someone, let let your community know. Let your community know, let the people around you know, like hey, like that is not a good person. You know what I mean. Don't gaslight yourself, don't gaslight other people when they tell you like I think I get a weird vibe from them, oh no, he's really nice. Like no.

Speaker 1:

Right.

Speaker 2:

And those, those, those, those intuitions are, are there for you, they guide you.

Speaker 1:

Right, and how many times have we heard? We heard it in the you know? We heard it in various cases when the victim will tell a friend or relative, a neighbor if anything happens to me, it was my husband If you or someone you know is the victim of domestic violence, the National Domestic Hotline provides highly trained expert advocates that are available 24 and seven to talk confidentially with anyone in the United States who is experiencing domestic violence, seeking resources or information or questioning unhealthy aspects of the relationship. The hotline provides life-saving tools and immediate response to empower victims and survivors to find safety and live abuse-free lives. Please call them at 1-800-799-SAFE, that's 1-800-799-7233. This is available 24 and seven and is available in more than 200 languages. Call them today.

Speaker 2:

Follow the show on whatever streaming site you're listening on.

Speaker 1:

And remember. All of the source material will be available in the show notes.

Speaker 2:

And follow us on Instagram at what we lose in the shadows and let us know if you want to hear a specific case.

Speaker 1:

Or if you just want to give us some feedback.

Speaker 2:

Okay, join us in the shadows next Tuesday. Bye.

Father-Daughter True Crime Podcast
Controversial Bathtub Death and Systemic Corruption
Drew Peterson's Crimes and Narcissism
Domestic Violence and Suspicious Disappearance