The Balance Code

Overcoming Burnout and Uncovering Money with Rachel Gregory

December 06, 2023 Katie Rössler Season 2 Episode 5
The Balance Code
Overcoming Burnout and Uncovering Money with Rachel Gregory
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers


Explore the journey from burnout to renewal with guest Rachel Gregory, an entrepreneur specializing in money coaching. Learn how Rachel transitioned from a conventional path to founding her own business after facing burnout and health challenges.

Discover the societal pressure of constant busyness and the importance of life balance and avoiding delayed gratification. Rachel shares insights on reevaluating priorities, challenging norms, and finding fulfillment in everyday life.

The episode also delves into Rachel's experiences in property investing and money coaching, highlighting the impact of our relationship with money on well-being. Gain wisdom on aligning passion with a career and improving your money mindset.

Join us for an insightful episode on living a balanced life for satisfaction and joy.


Learn more about Rachel here:

Facebook

Instagram 

Learn More About The Stress Less Space

Get a free Uncover Your Blocks Strategy Session with Katie

Follow The Balance Code Podcast on Instagram

Follow Katie Rössler on Instagram

Check out the podcast website

Speaker 1:

Welcome to the Balance Code podcast, a place where you have permission to step outside the hamster wheel of day-to-day life and learn tools to create more balance. My name is Katie Russell. I'm a licensed therapist and burnout and hidden grief specialist. I support ambitious, goal-driven people who are ready to get off the one-way train, to burnout and start to enjoy life to the fullest. Oh and, by the way, I'm an American living in Germany who's still learning the language, mom of three and an entrepreneur. Learning my Balance Code is what keeps me able to work in incredible ways without burning out. Welcome back to the podcast. Today I have Rachel Gregory and we're going to be discussing her burnout journey going through health issues and sort of a crisis with what do I do with myself now, from the career world to potentially entrepreneurship, how she's turned things around and the way that she's starting to help others understand money and their relationship to it so. Rachel, thank you so much for being here. I can't wait for us to dive in, but first can you share a little bit about yourself and your background, where you are and all of that, thank you for having me.

Speaker 2:

It's been great to be here, so take you back. So I guess my journey starts with following what was told was like the way to do life, which was do well at school, go to university, get a good job yes, sir. So that's what I did. I followed the path. You know I was quite a quick learner at school, so I, like I, did well at school, I enjoyed school, so that was yeah, tick, and I then ended up being the first one of my family to go to university, so that was a big achievement. It was like, yeah, amazing, got a university, landed the great job. And then, at certain point, I was like I'm exhausted, this is killing me. What the hell am I doing? Fast forward to 2011,. I find myself on an MRI scanner in Holly Street in London, having my brain in my spine scanned, with the neurologist believing I had MS and I was 35.

Speaker 1:

Oh gosh, rachel, what was that like to? You know, the world is your oyster. And you're like, okay, I'm going to have this career path. And then it's like now I'm an MRI machine.

Speaker 2:

Like, yeah, he didn't tell me until I went to get the results that that's what he was testing for. Oh, I was completely naive to that. That's what they were testing for, I think. Had I known, I think I might have been slightly freaked doing the testing. But yeah, fortunately I didn't know until he said well, I'm pleased to tell you you haven't got MS. And that was like that. I had my brain had to catch up, right. I was like what? So, yeah, that was a really big shock, because I just didn't expect. Hey, I'm suffering with this fatigue, I am exhausted all the time, I'm dealing with all of these other weird things that are happening, and I hadn't connected the dots.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, what were some of the weird things that were happening? Because a lot of the listeners are not listening to their bodies are not taking the time to go like oh, my, push deep and, you know, dig deeper. You've got this. Mentality is actually physically hurting me and physically my body is starting to like whisper and maybe cry out and then to the level you had it and I can completely.

Speaker 2:

I was probably disconnected from here down. Yeah, you were all in the head and we weren't connected to your body. It's amazing when you ask people like what's your body feeling? And they have. They're like, what do you mean? And I was that person, completely disassociated with how my body was reacting. So the weird and wonderful things it was doing was it was I would trip over things, I ran some things I would just trip over, I would put a glass down on the side, I would misjudge the side, it would hit the floor. I've never, or I never, was a to-do list person. Everything was in my brain and I would be having a conversation and I'd forget words mid sentence and I was like I honestly thought I was going insane. I was like this is not normal, what is going on? And then I have again really body wise. I was getting numbness in my limbs and my arms and my legs would go things and needles, which is quite common for me anyway. So I didn't worry so much about that to start with, but then I noticed it was becoming more prevalent and then numbness was in my legs. So I would just go to sleep.

Speaker 1:

So no one to the doctor is like, okay, we're going to test you for MS, but we're not going to tell you. And then you're like, okay, relief, even though I didn't know, that was something to stress about. I don't have MS, but what was the next step then? What was it that you needed to do?

Speaker 2:

The next well, the next medical world was to give me a Parkinson's drug. Wow, which I was like. The Parkinson's drug has been proven to help with fatigue. My mother is a children's nurse all her career. I'm not somebody that takes tablets, so I didn't really want to start taking a Parkinson's drug. So I was like what else you got? That was his answer. It's like this is what we've got for you. And then sent me back to my doctor. I went back to the doctor. She said I hear you've declined to take the drug and I was like yeah, and she was like well, I now need you to fill in this questionnaire Again. Me being completely naive, like highly educated woman, but completely naive to the situation she was in Filled in this questionnaire, which I then found was a depression questionnaire, which I then failed also. So then she wanted to give me antidepressants. Of course, that was the next thing on the list to offer me, right, which I also do one because I get it was another drug. So I was like what else you got? The answer at that point was the only other thing we used to offer with CBT, but that's no longer available. So bye, wow.

Speaker 1:

And all this time you're still working right, or did you?

Speaker 2:

just talk. Well, that's when I'm still working. Yeah, so that was. The funny part is that I then, not so long after that, I went into my annual review, my performance review at work, and I'd only shared with one person at work what had been going on. I somehow managed to do things in a way that they didn't realize. So the company I worked for every time we did sales me to, which was four times a year, we were meant to do a 5K run and we were meant to do a team activity, do the 5K run and then do the presentations the week. And I was like, if I do the 5K run, I'm not going to be able to present nine times this week. So I had to find a way to not do the 5K run. So I was doing lots of different things, like I was finding a different way to get a work. I was doing like everything in my power to make my life work when it wasn't really working. So, yeah, I went to my performance review and my first question to my manager was before we do any of this, can you just confirm that I've not dropped any balls this year? You're pretty happy with what I've done?

Speaker 1:

Oh, I'm just like, just tell me, I'm OK. Just tell me, I'm OK.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so that was my first question. He was like yeah, why? He was obviously very confused at this point with this question and I was like OK, I've got something to tell you.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and so that's when you dropped the bomb of like, hey, I've got health issues.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, hey, I've actually been doing this the last yeah, however many months and he was really great about it. To be honest, he was a bit like why the hell did you share with me? Like what do you tell? But I guess my concern at the time was it was going to be seen as like stress and not coping that you were strong enough.

Speaker 1:

Basically, yeah, and the negative was not.

Speaker 2:

You know, I didn't feel like the negative rhetoric that would go and communication that would go around. That would be the communication I wanted to be sharing, so I chose to keep it to myself.

Speaker 1:

So he's like you're good, you're doing great, and you're like really, because I feel like I'm falling apart.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, just right now my body is not working, my brain's not working either, so this is really not a good outcome here.

Speaker 1:

So when did you go? Enough to enough. I can't do this, Even though I'm performing, even though at work things are fine. When did you go? I just can't do this anymore.

Speaker 2:

So I was already there. I literally started having like every morning I'd wake up, go through a morning routine of like you get up, you get dressed, you put in your teeth, all the things right, but in the mirror in the morning when I was cleaning my teeth, I literally looked myself in the mirror and was going to literally my words out my mouth. But there's got to be more to life than this. And by the time I said that too many mornings in a row I was like this is not what life is going to be like at 35. This really isn't it.

Speaker 1:

Let's set the tone. You were working at a really good company. Yeah, we're doing really well, and so it's not like. This is what everybody told you. This is what it's supposed to be. This is the dream, exactly.

Speaker 2:

Exactly Then I felt like you talk about emotions, I felt like I'm the guilt and the shame, because I was like I don't want this life that everybody believes is the life. I'm getting told that 1,000 people would line up for my job, so, like, what's wrong with me? Now I feel guilt and shame, that I don't want the life that everybody else apparently wants.

Speaker 1:

And how did your family respond when you were like, hey, I can't do this anymore?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so I was a little bit nervous about that Because my dad was also a workaholic. My dad had worked, but I had grown up with a work hard to be successful, drummed in, even if it wasn't physically spoken. That's all I saw. Yeah, I saw my dad leave home at four in the morning. I saw my dad come home late at night, also ancestrally, both as a family, a kind of agricultural background. So it is work, that land, it's like hard work, right, it's the way. So he had worked really hard to provide a better life for his family, to provide the education, provide me to go to university, have those things that he hadn't been able to have. So I was a little bit nervous about not that they ever, even when I chose to go to university, they didn't know anything about that world because they'd never done it. So it was like they were forcing me to do certain things. There was none of that, but I still felt this you've got an ability, you don't waste it. Does that make sense? Yeah, I still. And it wasn't. I think that was an internal thing, it wasn't from them, it was still like I really enjoyed what I was doing. So it wasn't like I was had a gun at my head.

Speaker 1:

Right Enjoying it.

Speaker 2:

And I was like and I also thought I said I believed I was doing the right thing. I was like this is the way you get ahead, this is the way you get your promotion. You show up, you do the work, you keep going, you show that you're doing, you work hard. But I feel like presence was more important in the workplace than performance. When I worked in Europe. The cleaners were becoming in the late in the evening.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

And I'd be still at my dad's. Wow, you'd walk out at a slightly normal time in somebody to have half day.

Speaker 1:

Oh, wow.

Speaker 2:

Oh my gosh. So yeah. So when I had the conversation, I remember having the conversation with my dad and I was like, ok, I'm thinking about doing this. I'm a bit concerned that in my opinion, it sacrificed a lot of his life to provide my life. And now I was like I don't want it anymore. Bless my dad. You know, sometimes our relationship can be challenging because we're quite similar, but bless him. On that day he was like Rachel, I just want you to be happy. You've got to do what you think is right.

Speaker 1:

Oh, that's beautiful.

Speaker 2:

So it gave you freedom to make the choice you needed to yeah and like, as I say, to be fair to my parents, they've always been like it's your life, your decision. They've always been of that opinion. But, as I say, I think I put my internal thing of. As I say, I have this thing that he'd given up some of his life for mine, and again, that's what I feel like a lot of the world we live in now. Right, it's all about delayed gratification, it's all about, like, successes somewhere out there. Right, it was my, my philosophy now of why I do. It's kind of, live a legacy now, leave a legacy later. Right, because everyone's always on about like, well, I can create this, I can leave this for my children, or leave this for the community, or leave this for the world. But actually I believe that the legacy you're leaving is how you show up on a daily basis.

Speaker 1:

Yes, shot that from the rooftops. Oh, my goodness, like you know, how did you?

Speaker 2:

like you know, I went to the coffee shop this morning. How did I leave those people in that coffee shop? Those things make a difference.

Speaker 1:

I have your drawing attention to reprogramming a lot of belief systems.

Speaker 2:

Many of us around the world have been given to believe, though.

Speaker 1:

work hard, put in the hours and then delay gratification, you know, or it's for someone else instead of like hey, in this moment, now, you also have to take care of yourself, and also you can then take care of others in the future too.

Speaker 2:

You know the badge of honor of busyness like I walk out with pride, yeah. Like if anybody had to say how you're doing, I'd be like I'm busy. That was my standard. So much like I'm busy, like do you know how?

Speaker 1:

important. I am, yes, right, like I'm so wanted and needed. I was in the office until late last night and it's like our ability to see, like authority figures, like as the ones who put in all that work. Yeah, more and more we're learning that these are people that later on share the mental health issues, the physical health issues, the burnout and how it impacted their relationships and you go. Is that really what I want?

Speaker 2:

And that was what I was modeling. Yeah, that's what we've got to consider. Like, who are me modeling and for who? Like there's more ways to be successful than this. You know, even in entrepreneurialism I now realize it still shows up there, yeah. So even though I love is like I can't do this anymore in the employed world, I then moved into entrepreneurialism because I guess it was still my default way of being suddenly started to realize I was going down the same slippery path and I was like whoa.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

I really, really, really have the choice on this. Like, if I'm now in control of my working hours, why am I still going defaulting back into that Right? I'm doing a business that actually creates passive income. But I'm telling everybody I'm busy Like I'm never going to create passive income if it's still hard.

Speaker 1:

Exactly. I find that so funny. When you go from you know working at a company or a business to working for yourself, there's this mindset of what it's going to be like and all the freedoms that I get to choose. But actually those belief systems choose for you, those old habits and the habits you saw those around you growing up. They choose for you so you're stuck if you don't learn how to shift and change them and let go of worthiness and acceptance and love being from performance. So you lead that company. What was the burnout recovery process like? Or did you even give yourself time to?

Speaker 2:

It's a bit like yes I did, yes I didn't. But in the first year I was, there was a lot of I just need to regroup, but they were still like but I need to make money. I still need to pay the bills. So there was an element of, in all honesty, there wasn't enough. I should have just gone on having the year out and like fully surrendered to it by default. I think it happened like that anyway. Like do you know what I mean? I didn't really consciously say 2013 is going to be a right off, but when I look back, it pretty much was.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

So actually, again, that was the thing where I didn't, I couldn't declare or consciously choose at that point for myself that I could have a year out, because what would that say? to the world. Yeah, what would that mean? Like would I survive a year mentally, physically, all of those different things? But yeah, when I look back in hindsight you know Steve Jobs always says you can connect the dots in hindsight and I look back at 2013. It was a year that didn't really result in a lot of yeah, so my body was completely getting used to a new way of being. When you've been in that high performance state, let's call it, even in just that one corporate job for 10 years and that culture, it takes some deconditioning your whole identity, like my identity was my company. I was called a company named Girl Right. That was how I was described by all of my friends. So, even though, like, I had a friend say, what do we call you now? And I was like, how about Rachel?

Speaker 1:

Oh geez.

Speaker 2:

And I just want to say that speaks to we are on purpose not saying the company name.

Speaker 1:

That just speaks to the level of the company to just share, Like there was a push for everyone to create an identity around you because you were at this company. This is who you are. And now who are you? I'm sorry, wait, do I know you? And you're like yeah, I'm Rachel. Hello, I was always there. I was like where did you start? This is me. So you make a pivot and you go OK, I'm going to change things up. And how did that fall into your lap?

Speaker 2:

I moved into property, but how that happened was I just started thinking about what do I love, which is also really what got me where I was. I had twists and turns in life up to that point as well, of redirections and changes of direction, so that had already led me to there, but this it was a kind of a whole new time. Again, I was a decade older. It was like we were just coming out of a global recession. There was a lot of stuff going on where I was like how I actually do this? This time I'd also lost myself, obviously, with being ill, though it was like I've lost a lot of myself confidence. I was in, as we've known from my mental state of looking in the mirror too many times. I was in a bit of a dark place, so I wasn't in the strength of my mind, but somewhere, when I look back on the decision that I obviously have made, in that decision I still had, I guess, that inner belief in myself that I can change this situation, and it's nothing's gonna change if I always say this nothing's gonna change if I don't change. Only changes when you change and you choose that change. So I dug deep and so, yeah. So then I really looked and was like I've always loved property, even to this day, like my family. Whenever we're together, literally we're looking through estate agent windows looking at like, oh, that's cool, that's really nice. Never fricking bought anything. But we're always like, what if? Like living the fantasy, living the dream world of like the nice houses. So, as I say, we still do that today. It's just what our family does. I guess some people have very unusual family traditions and ways of being. That I was. We go look at every estate agent window on the street. So I was like so when people started asking me when I was, you know, I was leaving like, what are you gonna go and do now? That's obviously an obvious question. People ask, right, I'm like I'm gonna do something to do with property and I'm like I'm sure they were like, yeah, sure, we got no money. How are you gonna do that? Right, I was like the craziness of like, yeah, that sounds like a pipe dream, we'll see you at work next week. But again, like this is where I feel like I started to also recollect with the greater power out there. As I started to make, declare things and make decisions, the path started opening up. So again, I'd literally just gone to Regent Street lawyers on Regent Street in central London and got rid of my non-complete course. I've been to the lawyers office, signed a piece of paper to say I was now free to go and apply for whatever job in the world I wanted, which I clearly didn't do. But I then left there, went to the nearest tube station, got on the Victoria line to go north back to my home, and there was the London evening standard, which is a newspaper laying on the ground. I randomly picked it up and it opened up into this advert on the paper with how do I make money from property? It's like okay, there's a two hour seminar. And it was in a hotel literally around the corner from where I worked, and the only reason I knew that that hotel actually existed was because of me having to change my route to get to work because I was fatigued. I was now walking past this hotel as my new route.

Speaker 1:

Wow.

Speaker 2:

So, and my boss had also kind of dropped into the conversation like hey look, if you need to go and speak to recruiters while you're still working out your time here, like you know, just go. You know, don't ask permission, you just seem to go go. So I basically said I was going to see a recruiter and went to this two hour seminar.

Speaker 1:

I ended up recruiting you, but teaching you a new skill, right yeah exactly.

Speaker 2:

So, yeah, so that then led to that training, led to another training which led to another training, and I guess the rest is history. Then I then just I said, just kept following the breadcrumbs and trust, having a lot of self-trust in myself of this was my new path, and it just kept unfolding.

Speaker 1:

And I imagine having that self-trust helped when your dad, especially who you were like oh my gosh, you've worked so hard to get me here it was able to say you need to be happy, it's okay. And once we had that permission from him often we don't even really need the permission from our parents or whomever it is, but in the back of our mind we still do. And once we receive that, or finally give it to ourselves, we follow the breadcrumbs.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, what I've realized in my own discovery of myself is I'm actually quite internally referenced, so I'm very good at going and asking for a lot of advice from other people, but I always sense check of like. Does this make sense to me, like, does this feel? I know that alignment is a very clichéd word these days, but does this actually feel in my heart the right path or right decision for me? That's also been a great learning for myself of like. You know, sometimes you can get a lot of opinions from other people and it's that's great. That's your opinions and beliefs and other stuff showing up, but truly it's like what is right for me.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, so you're primed throughout your life to look at real estate.

Speaker 2:

Right, you're like this is what we do.

Speaker 1:

And then you see this ad. You're like yeah, sure, and you go do these trainings, and now where are you?

Speaker 2:

So now I'm like, ok, maybe I can actually do this. Well, I'm, but then, let's say, the average person would be looking at my situation going you've got no job, you've got no income, you've got a lot of large expenses living in central London. I'm single right, so I have no financial backup person slash plan and I'm chronically ill. Yes, this is a really good idea to take like a third of your redundancy package, put it into a training program and go and learn how to invest in property. I also subsequently had friends telling me I'd been scammed. I had all the like, the rhetoric again of like, why? Like, this is not the norm, right, this is like entrepreneurialism was not a normal practice in my world, so it was. Yeah. A lot of people, I think, were like what the hell are you doing? Yeah, but again, it was that belief of like I think I can actually do this.

Speaker 1:

I imagine that part of your burnout recovery process was learning a new skill. That was you know, not the old stuff, not the mundane, not that I had. Nine to five, this is what I was, or nine to 10, this is what I was normally doing. Right, it's let me learn something new. Let me just have a little fun with this, let me just see, and that probably gave you some energy back and a little bit of a pep in your stuff.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, converted this, I'm going to really ruin this quote, but there's a Dale McCartney quote which is something about, basically about getting back into action gets you back into clarity rather than sitting at home, put you in doubt and fear, like that really isn't the quote, but yeah, something like that and you'll find the quote and I think that for me is really true. When we sit and kind of, yes, there's obviously a time that we need to go about emotions, to prove, emotions, to process and do all of that, then like emotionally disconnect and just not go there Like that's the old way of being right. So, yes, we need that. But at the same point, I feel the momentum forward also helps us glean the clarity and the yeah, the direction of the path unfolding in front of us. So for me, yeah, like learning that as a whole new thing. Weirdly, obviously, you have what you don't realize again at the time is you have a lot of skill sets from all the things you've done previously that actually can just be transferred into a very different industry. But yeah, I think you're right, it's the learning, something new, putting yourself in a new environment, putting yourself in a new environment of people that opens up a lot of opportunity and change and, like I also realized again, I really reconnected back to my values and freedom was number one and growth number two. And I realized that actually I was where I think I disconnected a lot in the, which was also potentially causing my illness in the past, was or whatever you want to call it was I would. I'd stopped growing. I definitely had felt like I wasn't getting the growth in the company that I felt I needed, and the more you don't get that, then I think that becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy. But I also hadn't been doing my own self-growth work outside of the company. I'd stopped that too, like I stopped reading, I stopped learning, whereas I'm, like you know, in human design I'm a line one, I'm an avid learner.

Speaker 1:

Yes, oh my gosh, you need to be that Like. Yes, that fuels you.

Speaker 2:

That fuels me, right. But then almost to a line three, which now makes complete sense because I learned through my experiences. So which? Is why my life can be like trial and error.

Speaker 1:

I'm a three-time trial and error.

Speaker 2:

I was trying to find the way. I had to go through the trial and error to find it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and you did so. You've done the best buildup to Rachel.

Speaker 2:

What is it you do now?

Speaker 1:

Because you haven't even like. I'm excited for people to be like, so what is it Okay? Property Like?

Speaker 2:

what do you do now? So I now invest in property. So I buy empty, slash, rundown like distressed properties and I give them a new lease of life, which I love. So that's my creation side again. So I love creating. So it's like not that I'm actually physically doing the creation, like these hands don't do the work I wasn't made for. Maybe that, although I'd like to give it a go, but I'm probably not the best served to do that but yeah, so I then turn those you know houses around, either renovate or convert into them beautiful homes, so then my tenants can again thrive, not just survive. I want to provide them good quality homes that they don't need to worry about.

Speaker 1:

Oh my gosh, that's amazing. And so, from doing that, how did the money mindset stuff?

Speaker 2:

come about too, Because like you're multifaceted.

Speaker 1:

It's not just that's what I like.

Speaker 2:

I'm not pretty good at putting myself in one box. This doesn't work. I'm like trying to break out all the time. But for me. So then I, when I started doing the property and have a success, the training company that I did my training with came back and said, hey, can you come back and help us? And then I started doing different trainings and then coaching and stuff for them. At one point I was doing more like phone coaching and I was speaking to people all over the world and I just got really present to whether people had or hadn't got money. They still had a challenge around it. And that was eye opening for me. Because again we go back to the beliefs that we're brought up with this like well, if you've got, when you have the money, then the worries go away. Right, it's like you know. But if I was worrying about money, but when you get it, then you're set a bit like the success, you get the good job and then you're fine. I was like I'm on, and then this isn't, this isn't stacking up. So again I was like, okay, you know, I remember a guy in Australia telling me he had got a one. You know, he's quite like proud of that. He got a $1.2 million turnover business. But then when I looked at the numbers I was like, but you've got like $2.50 in your bank account. So again it was like everyone focuses on the making money, yeah, focusing on the holding of the money. And then what do you do with it? Right, you're going to make a $1.2 million or $20,000, you're not keeping either any of it. It doesn't really make a difference what the top figure is, right, but that again, in the world we live in, even to today, the focus is on the revenue figure, not on the net figure. So that was my big realization. So that got me into like hang on a minute, I've always been pretty good, practically, with money. Like even growing up I would manage my mind and my brother's money. Like if we got any birthday money or Christmas money it all got screwed away into a bank book and I'd be managing that. But I was like I don't necessarily have the skills on the what's, the inner workings of our relationship with money, of why this is the situation for everybody. So it manifests in different ways of what the challenges were, but they were still present. So that's when I became a certified money coach.

Speaker 1:

I think it's beautiful that you're able to use the journey you experienced working for a company, earning a good income and being like I got to walk away from this, this is really not what I thought it would be and then like, let me find my passions. Ooh, I'm seeing some patterns in people. Let me find a way to help them. Like you really have turned your life experience into a service to others, and I can imagine when you sit down and tell somebody like this individual with this great company. Like sure, it sounds great on paper, but let's talk about the reality of what's really going on and how it's really impacting you. That's a whole different story. I mean, that's the grief work I do with my clients. Right, it's like sure. On paper you look like your life is great, but inside, how are you feeling? Not so good. Let's talk about that.

Speaker 2:

I do spoke to somebody in a female entrepreneur last week. She had done all the right things, like she'd built her business, which was her whole thing. Like I want to create more income to provide for my family, so she'd built this bigger business. She'd gone from 200,000 to nearly a million Amazing, right, like well, compared to her, she'd done everything that it had taken. She'd built this seven figure business, which again, is that like utopia. Like built the seven figure business. She'd then got the family a bigger home, the children were now at private education, all of the things she had now done. But now suddenly she feels like she's got more stress on her Cause she's now got this imposter thing of like well, what happens if the entire thing humbles?

Speaker 1:

Right.

Speaker 2:

I've worked really hard to create this. Now I've got to keep the engine running.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

So that's why I'm like working with people on yes, there's an emotional piece there, we've got to help and support around that, but also it's that's why I'm also wanting to help people on the practical side again. For me it's again it is the emotional side and the practical side, the spiritual side and the down and dirty side put the investments in place from her income she's making, from the business, so she can have that foundation of long-term security, so she's not always reliant on the active income. Because, again, if, like that person got how ill, like I did at 35, then what happens? Like a lot of entrepreneurs, it's just them right, they don't have the backup plan. 34% of entrepreneurs don't have a retirement or exit plan. So what happens if any of those bad bits come in.

Speaker 1:

You get to bring the reality to the situation. Even those who seem and feel like they're so successful in business you're able to go okay. Your hard work and your drive got you here, but now what's going to keep you stable is practical strategies, and you get to come in and bring that from your own life experience, like I. Just I think it's amazing.

Speaker 2:

And as much as I would say wow for you.

Speaker 1:

I wish you didn't have to go through all that pain and trouble and challenge and struggle and questioning and everything.

Speaker 2:

But I can totally see now why you had to and I feel like that is, you know, you're going back to the human zone. That really is my line three. That's my gift of that journey, right, it's sharing the emotional side, the mental side, everything that happens.

Speaker 1:

It's all had to come together totally. Rachel, thank you so much If people want to connect with you. If they've got some questions about working with you around the money mindset or learning from you for the property piece of it, where can they connect with you?

Speaker 2:

So I'm all over social media. So Facebook, instagram, linkedin, you'll find me. Rachel Jane Gregory. Instagram, I am Rachel Jane Gregory, but yeah, just search my name and hopefully you'll find me.

Speaker 1:

Excellent. You will find all of her links below, so you can make sure to connect with her that way. Rachel, this has been lovely Thank you for being open to sharing your story, to really helping us dive into what it can look like when you're going through burnout, and then the choices you can make, because often we think, oh, after burnout you just rest all the time and then you get better, but you really show that you can still be taking action and recover. Absolutely, it is a combination. Yeah, thank you so much. Thank you, and make sure you connect with Rachel Again. Look at the links in the show notes description below. I hope you enjoyed today's episode. If so, take a moment to leave a rating and a review, interested in learning more about my work and the resources I have to support you in this season of your life. Check out the links in the show notes to connect and learn more and, as always, here's to finding our balance code.

Navigating Burnout and Career Transitions
Reevaluating Priorities and Challenging Social Norms
Exploring New Opportunities and Growth
Property Investing and Money Mindset
Recovery and Action After Burnout