The Alimond Show

David Pena - Realtor

December 28, 2023 Alimond Studio
The Alimond Show
David Pena - Realtor
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Imagine you're a 21-year-old working at a restaurant when a customer tells you, "You'd be great in real estate!" Would you listen? Our guest did, which served as a launching pad for his extraordinary journey into the realm of real estate. From grappling with the early struggles to closing big deals, our guest has seen it all and is here to recount his fascinating tale. He shares his lessons on perseverance and patience, his thrilling experience of closing deals, and how he started placing value over money in the marketplace.

Have you ever dreamed of building a team, mentoring others, and investing in real estate to the tune of $10 million? Our guest did, and he's well on his path to achieving this. He opens up about how he's preparing to share his story of overcoming adversity and finding success, and the therapeutic effect it has had on him. He also shares his plans for the future and the ways he wants to assist others on their real estate journeys.

Lastly, we converse about the importance of investing in yourself and real estate. Likening it to planting a tree, our guest puts forth a compelling argument on why the best time is now. We delve into the art of identifying profitable and enjoyable pursuits, ensuring your investments are worth your time and energy, and keeping the process enjoyable. Tune in to unravel a treasure trove of insights, all wrapped in a fun and lively conversation, which is sure to motivate you to take the first step towards your real estate dream.

Speaker 1:

How are things going for you?

Speaker 2:

It's going, they're going.

Speaker 1:

What are you doing marketing-wise In? This fun economic way so.

Speaker 2:

I'm doing a little bit of Facebook advertising. How's that going? It's okay, I mean, it's going.

Speaker 1:

I know how it goes because I've done it for clients and for myself.

Speaker 2:

Okay, yeah, it's not that great, I mean, but I, yeah, I'm just doubling down on clients referral bays. I mean, people already know me, they like me, so it's like, why wouldn't I?

Speaker 1:

You've already impressed them with your.

Speaker 2:

My charms Charms, so it's easier for them to say yes. Right, it's like what? Why wouldn't it? It would be stupid for them not to work with me.

Speaker 1:

You're like great.

Speaker 2:

So yeah.

Speaker 1:

I remember the 40 under 40 presentation video and the best video.

Speaker 2:

Listen, I still use what I'm like making your connections. So I was like, oh, I got it 40 under 40. And because I broke a couple of people, some of my friends came and they're like everybody was so serious. They were there, right, yeah, and mine was like the funny one.

Speaker 1:

I remember sort of cracking out. Katie comes up to me afterwards and she's like why did you? I'm like, listen, it's all about personality, right.

Speaker 2:

Wow, thanks, katie, that was funny. No, I still talk about a video. Yeah, it's a funny video. How?

Speaker 1:

did you Now? Who are you with now? Are you the same place?

Speaker 2:

Same with Atoka.

Speaker 1:

Atoka Okay.

Speaker 2:

Properties.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, how did you even get into real estate in the first place? Like what were?

Speaker 2:

you doing with real estate Maybe, maybe not. Oh wow, this is great, this is great. So that's funny. I was working at a restaurant a local restaurant as a waiter and I met this lady and she's like you'll be great in real estate. I was about 21. And I was like college is kind of expensive.

Speaker 1:

It was like a couple of years ago.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, no, I was 21.

Speaker 1:

I said a couple of years ago.

Speaker 2:

Listen, I look young, I just keep myself to be young.

Speaker 2:

Genetics. Yeah, I looked into it and I was like, oh my gosh, this is so easy, the bar is so low that anybody could do real estate. I'm like I can make millions of dollars. So I took the classes and you know, they don't teach you nothing about real estate, you just stupid laws like, oh, don't discriminate, oh, let me explain. And anyway. So I took the test, went to join this company. Keller Williams started with Keller Williams and she was like started going there and I'm like, what the hell am I doing? Like I have no idea what I'm doing. I've never done sales. And, yeah, the reason I thought I was going to make so much money I was like this is my ticket to become multi-millionaire.

Speaker 1:

So you got your license thinking I'm going to become a millionaire. And then you got into the real world and was like, oh crap, I have to sell stuff.

Speaker 2:

Right, yeah. Well, it's like I don't know people who do I know that are looking to buy a house or sell a house, nobody's going to trust me. I was 21, 22 at that point. It's like you're young, you're starting out and you have no idea what you're doing. So then my perspective a little changed a lot. I mean, I've grown in the last two years, you know, because I'm only 24. So I was like, okay, this is not about making money, now it's about providing a value. The marketplace is going to compensate you to the value you provide.

Speaker 2:

So it was a total mental switch. I mean, I still want to be rich, I'm still going to be multi-millionaire, but it's going to take Just that instant. Please, you got to put that Right. I thought I was like I have a real estate license, People should be just giving me their money and it's not. And so now you have to provide a value, you have to do whatever it takes, right, it's not. I mean it's insane, it's crazy. But trying to make it happen and yeah, I got in the first couple of years were tough, but I'm so glad I went through it because it teaches you patience, it teaches you perseverance. But also, I think if I would have known what I had to go through, I would be like hell. I'm not doing this, I'm staying here doing whatever and and but You'd still be waiting.

Speaker 1:

Tables over the next person.

Speaker 2:

I would probably still be waiting, yeah, and yeah, I mean, yeah, I would probably be doing, still be doing that, but I'm glad I did it and but yeah, it's kind of like if you see a map and you're like, yeah, you have to go, you have to fight some sharks, you have to beat some bears, it's like you go through the witches and.

Speaker 2:

Right, right, right. Evil forest. It's like the hero's journey. It's like if I knew I had to fight a dragon, I would have just stayed there and be happy. But yeah, so, but I'm, I'm loving it. I got in, I started liking it, I started selling some real estate and it's like the high that you get when you close deals. You're like this is sad.

Speaker 1:

This is better than any drug ever.

Speaker 2:

Right, that's my drug. I've never tried drugs, but I think it's great. I love it. I mean, I love helping people. I love when first time homebuyers they buy their first houses, or I'm working with investors and they're like get $800,000 worth of real estate or a million dollars worth of real estate, and they're like, oh man, I have three houses now. I never thought I was able to do this. So that's very rewarding, very rewarding. And then you get paid for that. It's like okay, you get compensated.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's a great thing. Right, yeah, yeah so yeah, what did you want to do when you were like eight years old?

Speaker 2:

So I grew up in a several a terrible country, very poor, and I would see movies, I would see telenovelas. You know, whatever the person that I wanted to be like the one that was dressed, the best lawyers every movie I saw, every telenovela I saw the lawyer was wearing a suit good looking dude, like successful. You can just tell and you're like I want to be like that guy. And for the longest time I wanted to be an attorney, until I started looking into college in the States and it's like there's no way I can afford being going to law school and all this stuff. And then, once I got into real estate, I started learning and I was like, well, you have to learn to sell, because if you're an attorney, you can be the best attorney, but if nobody knows about you, nobody's gonna hire you and that means that you have to market yourself, you have to sell yourself where in real, say, you can do use the same thing. So that's how I got.

Speaker 1:

Now, how did you go from El Salvador to here?

Speaker 2:

So we crossed the Rio Grande, you know, okay. No, so my brothers were here. People are gonna think that I'm like serious, let them think whatever they want. No, so my brothers were here. I was about 14. My brothers were here, my, my dad.

Speaker 1:

Sorry I'm slow. I'm just now putting the pieces together.

Speaker 2:

No, so my brothers were here. My mom was sick, so I was gonna buy myself. I was growing up with myself and I mean that time El Salvador was like a really dangerous place, like if I would have stayed there I would probably be dead, because I would have tried to find a gang to click, you know. So I would probably be dead. So I'm so glad my brothers brought me here.

Speaker 1:

So, and yeah, how old were you when you came over 14, I was 14. You're still a kid.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I was still a kid, yeah, so. But I came to America and I was like, holy moly, this is the. This is the land of honey and what's that was the word. The land of flowing honey and milk? Yeah, the promised land. This is the promised land. Yeah, the promised land. So so, yeah, yep.

Speaker 1:

And then. So since then you became a waiter, was that your only job that you had?

Speaker 2:

No, so so we're gonna go deep, right? Yeah, so the I came to America, I got a job as a dishwasher and I didn't speak any English and my brother was gonna send me to school.

Speaker 1:

Now, was this all local Lisbur.

Speaker 2:

Lisbur, yeah. So my brother was gonna send me to school. One of my brothers went, was going to send me to school, but he wanted to go back, so I ended up not going to high school because I didn't have a garden. Oh, wow, yeah. So I was 15, I started working at this restaurant as a dishwasher and I hated every moment of it.

Speaker 2:

I was like I need to learn English because if I wanted to succeed in this world, the basic thing, the smallest step I could do, is learn the language. So I went to ESL classes with a dog, like I was a kid, and these people are in their 30s, 40s, 20s. I'm there learning English one day a week and then, based on what I was learning, I started going more days and then at age 17 or 18, I learned about the GED. I was going to ESL classes, still going, and I was like, oh, esl is like almost the equivalent of high school diploma. So I went and got my GED. Took me probably.

Speaker 2:

I don't even remember how many times I took the test. It's probably eight times. So looking back, I'm like what the heck was I thinking like what was? Where was the drive? I wish I could get it back. I think it's still in there. But I'm like what kind of kid goes back to take a test like eight times and fell and I'll say, okay, I'll try again, whatever. I mean, it was pretty cheap, you. I had to pay like six dollars for subject, so I don't think the money was an issue, but but yeah, the hardest was I had to write an essay in English and they didn't have chat GPT then they did not have it well.

Speaker 2:

Even if they did well, I guess I couldn't memorize it and they just go yeah, it was, yeah, so writing in. I'm not even a good writer in my own language. Now, in English it's like I think I 100% believe that the teacher, or whoever was grading the exams, saw my name so many times that they were like just give me, just let's just give it to him, otherwise it's not gonna give up like so. And I'm glad they did, cuz I was still taking the GED, so yeah, what an amazing story though.

Speaker 1:

I know I'm an amazing dude, oh really, I mean, that's really actually, that's yeah yeah, I don't really.

Speaker 2:

People don't. People don't care. I don't know. I think what is it? 80% of people don't care about your problems and the other 20% are glad that you have them. So I don't really lead the lead with that.

Speaker 1:

No, no, and I agree, and I do agree with that what you just said, but it humanizes when you can hear how this person whoever this person has got to where they're at. It didn't just magically happen overnight. It humanizes the person.

Speaker 2:

Maybe I don't know. I feel like people are I don't know, that's just me like we are so busy thinking about ourselves. It's like what am I going to do? What am I going to say that we don't have? They're like oh, that's a wow, that's a great story. It's like look at what I did. Have you ever been in a conversation with like yeah, my dog died and I was so depressed. It's like oh well, let me tell you about the story. When my dog died and it happened, so I don't do networking.

Speaker 2:

That's what you don't do see, so you know what I'm talking about.

Speaker 1:

But I'm saying more of just like when you go to meet your, when you're doing like a presentation presentation yeah, you want to know why they want to move. For sure, yeah, absolutely, because it helps you really dive into their motivation, who they are as a family or couple or individual, and so like learning that about you, because I know you not very well but I've met you a handful of times, and so to hear, like your coming up story, or at least a piece of it like it just makes you that much cooler, for sure, well yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1:

Obviously.

Speaker 2:

I know you know me a little bit and you're like there's no way this guy can be any cooler. And then, boom, you're like you hit me with that. That's right. No, but but no, I'm with you. Yeah, I think it's definitely have to be in a private settings where it's like a little bit more intimate. Yeah, you can't go to a networking event Like, hey guys, you know what I did. But yeah, I've had people tell me like you should tell your story more. It's like people don't really want to hear my story, I mean, unless it's like it depends, right, this is the situation. And but who knows, maybe I write a book. There we go what I once I make it to the million dollars be like from whatever to a millionaire, yeah, so so, in terms of you told me a little bit about marketing and how you're moving your business forward.

Speaker 1:

What are some of the best things, the aspects? I know you said you get high off of all the amazing things experience on the other end of working with you. But, like, where do you see your future in real estate? Are you thinking, okay, I'm just going to keep doing this, serving more people? Do you have a next level that you're working towards, or is your next level continuing to serve your clients Like it's good, this is a?

Speaker 2:

good question. Yeah, no, I think you know I got a couple of years ago. I got 40 under 40. I think that was my picked. He's like no. Once you get to the top of the mountain, you're like Okay, this is it. You're the pinnacle of the pinnacle. So you're like everything else looks. I was just being looking down Now joking.

Speaker 2:

I love helping people, I love helping clients, but I do want to build a team. That's going to be the next step. Have a couple agents working under me and because I love I'm a very self-motivating dude and I would love to have a small team where I could like hide them and be like, okay, this is what we need to do, kind of like coach them, you know. And then I think who said Benjamin Franklin, I think said the best way to learn something even better is to teach it. So I've achieved a level of success pretty much from nothing. Right, it's not like I, I'm not a trust fund baby. I don't have this big network starting in real estate. So if I could make it happen, I could definitely mentor a couple people in for them to succeed. So that's the next step I'm going to have. I'm going to build a team, a small team and then personally invest in real estate, because I do love real estate and believe in it, obviously.

Speaker 2:

I believe it 100%. My goal is to get to $10 million in real estate, like own $10 million in real estate document the journey for everybody else. Maybe because you have to be very careful, because some people, believe it or not, already think that I'm like somewhat arrogant and they're like, oh, this guy is just showing off, I know, I know. So so if I'm doing it like, look at me, look at what I'm doing, bossing my checks, here's the stresses of it.

Speaker 1:

Here's what I'm going through. This thing failed today. Oh yeah, like.

Speaker 2:

I know myself and I would. I would be like, hey guys, look at me, this is what you need to do. You want to be great, be like me. So maybe, maybe it's. It's I like better when, because, then, because you're gonna have people watching you and saying, good, he fell, I'm glad.

Speaker 1:

But it's like haters. Just as much as you need those encourager, yeah but it's better.

Speaker 2:

What's what's a better I can see somebody work.

Speaker 1:

I can see being that person that works hard with a little bit of a chip on your shoulder.

Speaker 2:

Maybe listen I went back to. I was talking to a very good friend of mine a couple, a couple days ago I went back to Osalvo about I hadn't been for like 16 years. I went back and so I grew up with my brothers right and my mom got was very sick when I was, when I was little I was. She got like some strokes and then she got another stroke when I was like six or seven. She couldn't take it on herself. So I was growing up with my brothers. My brothers immigrated to the United States so I stayed by myself and this is how it wasn't the city, it was the. It is like a very rural area.

Speaker 1:

So you were seven years old.

Speaker 2:

I was a little bit older. They immigrated later on, I was about from 12 to 14. I was like, oh my God, right. So I know I mean nobody came forward and say you're not going to amount to anything in life. But I know that these people because it wasn't the normal family, right, mom and dad is not that there? Or like did I have a mom or did I have a dad I was like kind of like, oh my, oh, my brother's worse, one of my brother was still taking care of me from here. But I didn't have like a parental guy. And I know for a fact that some people were like this guy, like, hey, make sure you're not really hanging out with David, because we don't know where, you know, like they probably felt bad, they probably didn't mean it, but I know for a fact that they probably that's how they thought. So it was great going back and I'm like do you know who?

Speaker 1:

I am. You wear the nice suit when you get it.

Speaker 2:

No, no, no, I should know, Show the video the 40 and the 40,. No, Bring the award. Be like, hey, you know what I got.

Speaker 1:

You know what this is. Can you hold this for me?

Speaker 2:

No, no, no. But it was cool going back because at the end of the day, I'm doing it for myself, but it felt good to go there and be like people. I'm sure the same people saw me and they're like holy God, that's this kid.

Speaker 1:

I knew him when he was young.

Speaker 2:

Right, right, right. It's like I knew. I always knew he would bounce us away. Yeah, right, so, but I don't think. I mean, I did have a chip on my shoulder before because of my dad, but you know, I went. I've overcome that. I went to like intensive therapy I'm kidding.

Speaker 1:

Nothing wrong with that Right right, right, yeah, whatever.

Speaker 2:

Two issues on right. But I think for me the best medicine, best therapy is like become the best, the best person you can be Like. If, because my dad is still alive, he's like 90 something and we never, we didn't have a relationship, he probably thought like, oh, this guy is whatever. So it's like listen, dude, if I ever talk, probably we'll never talk to him, but if I ever talk to him or he ever hears about me, he'd be like this kid could have my last name. My last name will be famous in the United States, One of the greatest country of all. But he missed out. But I don't, I don't really. I used to have a bowl that was a big chip on my shoulder, A couple.

Speaker 1:

I was gonna say do we need to have some therapy?

Speaker 2:

No, no, I'm good, now I'm like, oh, whatever. But before, yeah, before it used to be like very, very, I was very sensitive, yeah. But now I'm like but yeah, I don't go back to the chip on my shoulder. I don't think I have a chip on my shoulder. Maybe it is.

Speaker 1:

I always have to see. The way I process is I have to have a chip on my shoulder. That's how I motivate myself. You're talking about how do I get myself motivated? Like I was when I was young. So for me I'm self aware in terms of how I can keep doing and reinventing myself and literally that chip on my shoulder to push me. When that chip is gone, when I feel like things are good, then I just get complacent, I get comfortable.

Speaker 2:

You get the what David Gaggen says. The fridge is the. The fridge is full. The what the fridge is. You know, david Gaggen? Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah.

Speaker 2:

So he says, like you suffer from when you're going up and you don't have a lot of food. You work hard, you do whatever it takes and then, once you get to the level the fridge is full. It's like you open the fridge is like if you don't have nothing in the fridge you got to go work, but if you open, it's like chicken and it's like, yeah, so, but yeah, that's you got to keep, keep the chip on your shoulder.

Speaker 1:

All right. So, in terms of anything that you've seen, real estate wise, what's your? What's your? Speculations, what's your? What do you see in the future for Long County?

Speaker 2:

So that's a that's a great question. I'm going to talk a little bit more like the, because I don't know. I mean not on county. As you know, it's very strict on building, yeah, so I don't know what's going to happen. It is there is a shortage of homes. Yeah, there's about five to six million million homes that have not been built since 2008,. Whatever, the builders didn't stop, didn't build enough inventory to keep up with the demand.

Speaker 2:

I mean, we're 15, 16 years later and we're seeing that the interest rates are about 8% right now and people are still buying it. It's not you're not getting multiple offers, but people are still buying homes. And what happens in a year or a couple months? So, who knows, whenever the interest rates come down, it's going to be millions of people who can afford houses and that's going to bring the prices up. That's what I believe.

Speaker 2:

I, yeah, I'm telling people like you should buy real estate. I'm trying to. I'm like I should buy more. I should buy more real estate because it's like the interest rates might not be they're not pretty right now. It's like damn, like I'm spending this much on the interest rates. The closing costs are higher and if you're buying an investment property, it's even more, even higher.

Speaker 2:

So, but yeah, it's like, if, like, for me, if I'm thinking long term, it's like okay, yeah, we got it Because it is right now in the market that we are, it's cheaper to rent than to buy a home. But in five years you got to see what do you want to be renting in five years, like, or do you want to own a property in five years? Because if you buy a house right now and it's going to suck because it's going to be painful, but in five years you're going to be so glad you bought it because the property is going to be worth way more and hopefully the interest rates go lower. In the meantime you can refinance. It's easier to refinance a home than to buy a house.

Speaker 1:

So I imagine it like if you could go back five years and buy a house, would you do that?

Speaker 2:

Oh right.

Speaker 1:

Everybody says that.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, my first house I bought in 2015. I was just talking to a friend about this. I bought it for $266,000. And it sucked. It was quite the stretch. But looking at now, that house is probably worth closer to $200,000 more and I'm like if I would have built, if I would have bought five, my net worth would be a million dollars, right, right. But I mean, you don't know what you don't know, you can't beat yourself up going back.

Speaker 1:

It's good, though, to take those type of situations and apply it to decisions you're making now.

Speaker 2:

For sure, for sure.

Speaker 1:

So if you know that's something you should have done, you know what is that like? The best time to plan a tree is 20 years ago. Yeah, 10 years ago. The next best time is today.

Speaker 2:

Right? Yep, I actually saw it real a couple of days ago and I thought it was really a very cool reel. It was this girl just walking. I mean it was probably viral because she was a good looking woman. But he said people are saying like in the caption, like in the words on top, he says people are saying I'm so glad I bought a house 10 years ago and then it changed to 2023. 2033, you will be saying the same thing about a house and it's like you're right, so true.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, one of the best.

Speaker 1:

I mean shoot if I could have bought a house 30 years ago. Right, yeah, that was nine.

Speaker 2:

You know I was right. You've probably seen the memes where they're like I should have been buying houses in 2008 instead of spending time in kindergarten. Yeah, so, but yeah, I mean the best. Yeah, you said it right the best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago. When is the second best time today? So, yeah, and there's this book. I have not read it, but I've heard enough interview of the writer and he says the name of it is Wolf Can't Wait and he talks about in America, you're not going to die of hunger Like, especially if you're young. You should be taking risks because at the end of the day, if God forbid, you don't have money to eat. There's plenty of programs that you can get some money to eat, but at least you have hard assets and if you're investing in assets, you will have money to eat. You know what I mean.

Speaker 1:

I always talk about.

Speaker 2:

Right, yeah, I don't, I don't. I don't eat Taco Bell.

Speaker 1:

College, I survived off of Taco Bell.

Speaker 2:

I remember when I first came here I was working, making $8 an hour and I would go into Taco Bell. That was going to a very expensive restaurant. So it's like, yeah, but yeah, I mean I would try to make it work and stretch as much as you can, because if you were young, starting people in the business or in the working world, your income is just going to go up Right. So if your debt to income ratio right now is 46%, in a year, two years, you're going to get, hopefully you get raises, hopefully, you know, from providing enough value so the marketplace pays you well, you will be able to afford more. So yeah, like I said, when I bought my house I was like, oh damn, I don't know if I can do this payment. Now. It's like now it's like I could have done the payment very well. So but yeah, that's awesome.

Speaker 1:

Before we wrap this up, is there anything else that tips, advice, anything you want to share with the world, anything that's been on your heart or oh, that's a good question.

Speaker 2:

I don't know you shouldn't have told me this how you would have prepared a script and come back.

Speaker 2:

You would have had a tablet, you would have been like listen to this Advice and tip that I would have, for that's a tough question. I think invest, invest in yourself the biggest dividends. I think Warren Buffett said that you get the biggest dividends if you invest in yourself, because and investing in yourself, you know, it's funny I have a nephew. He's really young, very bright guy. Can you imagine? Somebody's up in and off but some trying to help him? He's young, he's like 18. So I'm trying to get him in the right direction and I'm telling him like investing yourself. And I see him he bought his expensive shoes. It's fancy for me, it's like he was like a hundred some change.

Speaker 2:

And I'm like dude, that's like, how many hours of work if you for you like for me, it's expensive. And I saw it. I was like, bro, what are you doing? What are you spending? It's like it's an investment. I'm like no People being like, oh Well, invest in myself, I'm gonna go and go to the mall and buy nice clothes and expensive brand brand Whatever name brands, and and, yeah, that's an investment in myself. It's like no, you got to invest in yourself in your education, in the same college, right, picking up a book, reading a book, taking courses. What do you? You know, I don't want to say like, do what you wanted, what you like to do, because that is like I don't know I. So I don't know if you guys know about who's in your tates great guy, all right, she's like, yes, he's great.

Speaker 1:

I actually personally really like him.

Speaker 2:

I do this guy listen.

Speaker 1:

He has so many great advice and you don't have to like everything right, you pick and choose yeah, you don't like everything they think and say do.

Speaker 2:

But he said One of the comments he made was like I don't read books because he's so stupid I'm like you're an idiot. But he said this advice he's like he was telling you think If you're going, oh, follow your passion, whatever, which is good it's, you get to love what you do, but at the same time, that shouldn't be the only motivation. You should be. Tony Montana said first you get the money, then you get the power, so you got to be seeing where the money is. So he was saying you think a Chinese man that works in construction is a multi-millionaire, his business is construction, you think he's exciting? Point down concrete and saying, oh, I love it, I'm living my passion.

Speaker 1:

Point out and maybe what he was seven years old. He used to play with Bob the builder, though.

Speaker 2:

No, maybe, maybe he was but you know what I'm saying like. So you gotta find things that you enjoy but at the same time, yeah, things that will make your money if. If you like painting and and doing art, well, maybe that's not gonna pay you money.

Speaker 1:

You can have it, as I'm sure you might be able to teach it Right YouTube channel and make a whole bunch of money.

Speaker 2:

That's true, that's true. Right, but it's like how far where they go, because it takes a lot of work and effort. So I would say invest, invest yourself and have fun. Have fun in the process, because I Meet so many people that they're so square and they're like they want to put you in these bags. It's like that joke isn't appropriate. It's like, okay, whatever, have fun. Man Like laugh. So, yeah, I like having fun, as you can tell.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, thank you so much for being a guest on the podcast.

Speaker 2:

Thank you for having me. I love this. This is great.

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