The Alimond Show

Bonnie Sewell - Managing Director, Senior Wealth Advisor of Dakota Wealth Management

March 21, 2024 Alimond Studio
The Alimond Show
Bonnie Sewell - Managing Director, Senior Wealth Advisor of Dakota Wealth Management
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Our esteemed guest details the meticulous strategy that led to selling their business at the apex of the market and the ensuing transition to a powerhouse firm. The narrative unfolds, revealing the trials of competing in a male-dominated industry and how this expert's personal history with divorce shaped a profound commitment to divorce financial planning, ensuring their clients emerge from one of life's toughest challenges on stable financial ground.

Unearthing the roots of financial acumen, today's conversation takes a turn towards the family table, where money talk becomes an invaluable lesson for the younger generation. The episode peels back the layers on introducing children to the concept of money, emphasizing the power of practical, everyday interactions to impart lifelong economic wisdom. Breathing life into this dialogue, our guest shares poignant stories from their own upbringing, illustrating how a child's perception of money is often deeply influenced by family events such as divorce, and why an objective approach to financial literacy is crucial.

Post-business sale life can be as daunting as it is liberating, yet our guest walks us through this transformative journey with ease, sharing the personal renaissance sparked by embracing memoir writing. As we explore the breadth of wisdom offered through Dakota's wealth management services, the dialogue underscores the importance of a personal connection between advisor and client. The episode wraps with a heartfelt message of gratitude for the chance to share these life-shaping experiences and insights, reflecting the very essence of what it means to manage wealth with a touch of humanity.

Speaker 1:

Why did you make that transition?

Speaker 2:

I was 63 and the market was the best it's ever been for selling my business and it had always been my plan to sell the business and it was a 12-year-old business at that point and it coordinated with a couple of other transitions. Our industry is heavily regulated. Compliance is important and arduous. As a two-person firm it can be overwhelmingly expensive and time-consuming. That also applies to tech stack. We have all the latest and greatest because we have to compete with the big boys. It's a boy culture in my industry, so loved it. It was my second registered investment advisory firm. We could do it my sleep.

Speaker 2:

But there comes a time when you need the payoff of the sale because it's only going to get harder from here and our industry is consolidating. So it makes sense to get with a bigger firm and I had the opportunity. Dakota is a very special firm. I had the opportunity to put my sale price largely forward and enjoy that growth from there. When I joined them they were maybe a $1.3 billion firm. Today we're a $4 billion firm just a few years later. So lucky, good timing, and it was the right thing to do for me, because now I'm 66 and the world is opening up in terms of opportunities and maybe I won't do this forever, although I might do something at Dakota for longer.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, no, that's really smart In terms of how this is, and we're going to go ahead and get started in terms of how this has changed anything for your clients.

Speaker 2:

Well, in important ways it got better for them. Because that old story about if you get hit by a bus well, I actually had an uncle that got hit by a bus in Chicago. He stepped off a curb one day and a CTA bus came and took him. It happens, but people make it sound as if you wouldn't be able to carry on. If my doctor, cpa or lawyer gets hit by a bus, I'm going to call somebody else. I'll be sad and it'll be a transition, but we all survive. So I think maybe they overplay that just a little bit, but for my clients they got a huge investment team. They got a company that can afford to invest in the future in a way I never could as a two-person firm. They still get me and all that 33 years of expertise and knowledge, all that good stuff. So I think they won big. I think it worked for everybody. I think Dakota got divorce expertise that they will exploit in the best way going forward, and so you're talking about divorce expertise.

Speaker 1:

That's what we do. That's what you've always focused on.

Speaker 2:

Yeah always why? Well, for most people going through it, it's the largest financial transaction of their life, whether they appreciate that at the beginning or not. Our reflex is to call attorneys. Some of my best friends are attorneys. This doesn't take anything away from them, but they can sometimes see it that way and bless their hearts. They don't know money and they're not qualified to know money in the vast majority of cases, and yet they do it.

Speaker 2:

So let's take Dick and Jane. If Jane, for example, still the one most frequently unfamiliar with her money, jane's also still the only one that can have kids. If the family decides to do that, jane's the one that's going to step out of the workforce and endure that financial difference which we can quantify. And now it's time for Dick and Jane to go forward. Well, there's nothing to be benefited from sinking Dick. That doesn't help the community, doesn't help the family, doesn't help the process. But we've got to elevate Jane's financial position to make a fair division, to let them move forward. That's the work we do and it's easy for us.

Speaker 2:

It's difficult for Dick and Jane, nearly impossible for the attorneys to get right. And if we don't get it right, the state has an interest in getting it right, because we're all going to pay Jane's bills going forward if we don't get it right. So I'm sure Jane's a wonderful person, but if there was enough in the marital estate, I don't want to pay her bills going forward. So that's where we need to get it right. And it makes sense. Wealth management shows up at people's transitions. We're buying a business, we're selling a business, we're retiring, we're getting a promotion. We show up everywhere. Why wouldn't we show up in the most important and substantial and earthquakey financial transaction of your life? It just doesn't make sense. So we're there. So we're there.

Speaker 1:

Now, what inspired you to specifically dive into this?

Speaker 2:

So I was a childhood divorce. We were always worried about losing our home. My dad took his paycheck pension and left four people behind with a mom who had been staying home, trained as a secretary, worked as a waitress, worked her way up to catering manager so we could keep our small 1,300 square foot home so we could go to the schools. My grandparents went to Fast forward. I move in with the guy I meet at 19 because I have absolutely no confidence and he seems to like me and I stay for 28 years 25 of those married but the marriage dies early. I stay because we keep moving. I have children, dogs. We eventually get two homes. This is a postcard life. I could never have imagined from where I started why would I upset this apple cart, as anyone who's been married long term that it didn't work. You can fill in the blanks a million ways and they'd probably all be pretty close, but it was a phone call. So I, when I divorced, I had a registered investment advisory firm in Georgia. I sold that to a firm in Florida. I was moving down there to take over that firm. Long story short, it didn't work. The owner was not ready to sell. That was 2008. She ends up selling in 2017. So I glad I didn't wait all that time.

Speaker 2:

But when I came up here, I got. I started another registered investment advisory firm and I got a phone call from a mom of four kids who had been divorced and was post settlement. So we already know what she got in her settlement. Can you help me? Probably. Let me take a look. I take a look. She had been a homeowner for decades. She's now a renter. She does not have enough income that she's trying to make as a realtor. She cannot do it. The numbers don't work. Anyone who had been remotely familiar with personal finance would have been able to See that before she signed. But she wasn't familiar and she didn't see it and she signed and we couldn't help her.

Speaker 2:

Our best Advice was pathetic. You know you need to find friends you can move in with, you need to get stabilized maybe a new, new boyfriend, someone who can help pay the bills and then, honestly, I would go back to your lawyers and suggest that there needs to be a better outcome here, or they're gonna have to figure this out, because we have four kids, a mom who can't pay. It's just. It was devastating. So I thought to myself why is this still happening? I mean, this is 1966 happening all. How have we not gotten better?

Speaker 2:

So I put a stake in the ground and when I opened this registered investment advisory firm, I wrote a book trademark to process and said we're going to make some noise here and we have to get the public To ask the question I'm in the largest financial transaction of my life. Who should I be talking to? And of course, you want to know your legal rights. That's the backstop. If we can't figure this out, you'll be in a room with a gavel, with people who don't know or love you Making decisions on your future. Can we stop that before it happens? I think so.

Speaker 2:

We do models. They're compelling because they're backed up by institutional documentation. I mean, this is all Jargon in our business, but the point is Dick and Jane can move forward. We're going to help them do that. We're going to show them. Dick often has to win. We're going to help Dick see how he does win, because the truth is if Dick's employed and he makes more than Jane, he wins day of divorce, no matter what Jane gets. Yeah, and it's just because of that acceleration that exists like gravity. He goes forward with better pay, better benefits, better bonuses on top of Getting half of what was in the marriage.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, wow.

Speaker 2:

I get a little excited about this one because it's 2023 and I'm a little surprised we're not further along. What? Why do you think that is? I think money is still a forbidden topic to talk about Comfortably. We like our money as entertainment. We compete on money. I think money between couples. I don't think we raise girls to ask questions about money because it's not romantic. I don't think we ask boys to talk to their partners about how their Spouse may contribute to the household by having children, by running the household, by working outside the household. These are grown-up conversations. If you're old enough to marry, we'd want you to be having. I don't think they happen routinely at all and that's the thing that sets us up for a long time together and then one day we don't like each other as much. And now we've got to go back to the beginning. I've got to learn about my money. I've got to learn how it works, all under the grief of this marriage dissolving what?

Speaker 2:

does money mean to you Freedom, safety. It certainly isn't everything, because I've been privileged to work with exceptionally wealthy people and it can't protect them from life, but it can make moving through life incredibly easier. So if anyone's known the pressure of poverty, there is people think you're going to get you know there's contagion, like if you're a poor person I might be more poor if I hang out with you. I mean, these are the kinds of things children think about, and if you're rich, I make assumptions that you have things that come to you that are better than what I can get. So I think money. We apply all kinds of things, including deities, to them.

Speaker 2:

You know money doesn't know where, care, who has it. So I don't know why we're doing that. It's an inanimate object that can be used as a tool, but when you're under the pressure of poverty, the only thing you can think of is how do I get through the day, how do I pay for the next meal? I mean a lot of our vacations. Our third meal was crackers from another meal that we had, so we would that would and something to drink. I'm here, I'm fine, but it's daunting not to be able to afford things and in this society. You're penalized socially for not being able to afford things. So I think money is. I can connect money to anything which gets quite annoying in social situations, but I can and I think it's. I wish we would talk about it more.

Speaker 1:

What do you mean by that?

Speaker 2:

You can connect money to like everything, including, or it gets a lot of social, so we always ask people to do this thought experiment for the next week. Things drop politely and look at how many times you hear someone making a connection to money in the conversation they're having with another. It's stunning. We're a little bit possessed by it, but we won't put our full attention to understanding it when it could lose some of its grip over us in a good way.

Speaker 1:

If we understood it properly.

Speaker 2:

If we understood it properly.

Speaker 1:

yeah, how do you go about understanding it properly?

Speaker 2:

I think you need to. It's funny, you know, in a world of financial advisors where, not unlike realtors and some other service professions were tripping over each other in many business situations. But if you ask people if they have someone in the family that's a financial advisor, the answer is almost always yeah, I got somebody I know. Well, take advantage of that. See what they know that they can tell you. We have had for many years financial literacy information available in every form known to man, whether it's video, audio, whatever Print. If it was as easy as taking in that information, we'd all be financially literate. It's difficult to do it that way, so I think it's ground combat. I think that it's person to person talking. If you're lucky enough to be born into a family where money is discussed, you have a chance of understanding it better. If you're not in a situation where money is being discussed, endeavor to find out more. The first place you start is what do I cost in the world? What's the cost of me? It's a great exercise because you'll pull in things that apply to your life and to me.

Speaker 2:

The easiest way to teach children about money is just like we teach them about anything else we want them to grasp. You weave it through everything else. You don't sit them down for a money lesson oh kill me now. I can't imagine a kid sitting for that. But if you're out and about, you're at the restaurant. Who's working, who's paying, who's buying, how did the food get there? There's so many opportunities to interject a financial aspect to get them thinking, so that they ask a lot of questions. And if you don't know the answer, I guarantee there's a place to find it. So what type of questions.

Speaker 1:

Should the kids or young adults or adults be asking about money? Because you're talking about who's paying, who's making it. Why does all of this matter?

Speaker 2:

Because when you're a child. I'll give Dick and Jane another chance here. Dick goes out the door and brings back a lifestyle and Jane disperses the lifestyle. If I'm the children in that marriage, I may have no connection to the things that both people did. So Jane is in lieu of many other people that would normally be paid for that function. Dick is getting paid. We think he comes back with money. We don't know what Dick has endured to get that money. It's often quite a bit more than I might want if I'm Jane. So our roles are fine.

Speaker 2:

But as a child I have no idea how this interplay. I just know things happen and as I grow into a teendom I start to accumulate things and they appear too car insurance phones. So we do a mommy and me thing where we ask the tween or the teen to figure out how much they cost mom and dad. It's a fun exercise. There's no penalty for it, but it can be illuminating and we've had feedback like oh, my daughter, when we were at the doctor, asked me what the copay is. You go to the doctor. You think that, like there's no exchange of money, so digitally we have an even bigger hurdle now because there's no exchange of money. We don't even count it back, we don't see it. So now we have a little bit bigger hurdle to understand what's being exchanged.

Speaker 1:

But it is the grease of the world, so we want to understand it, and the reason why I asked is because I was curious personally, because I've got an eight-year-old and see, I find it annoying, but I should stop finding it annoying. He asks about how much everything costs. I love that, you're right, though, but it's because between I'm now divorced, but it's between me and his dad.

Speaker 1:

His dad has a different viewpoint of money, whereas I do not. I mean, I have an opposite way of looking at money and so for Yusuf, anything he gets, he's like how much is that? And then I'll tell him $10. So that's a lot, right. I'm like maybe it can be, but no, it's fine. He's like OK, so I should put it back.

Speaker 2:

I'm like no, no, it's fine, we need it, so it's interesting. So it's a lot if you have $9 and it's not a lot if you have $12. So you can help him contextualize it. But I love that he's asking the questions and it's really interesting for children of divorce they can become if they're allowed to become acutely aware of money.

Speaker 2:

So you have an opportunity that parents in a intact household, as we would say, or whatever term they're using these days for something that hasn't been interrupted yet, they may not be discussing money at all. So I would take those opportunities and I would encourage his exploration around everything financial and wherever fear shows up, remind him it's a tool. Until we spend the money, we have the money. Why would we spend the money? Maybe we need it, maybe we want it, maybe it's for someone else, so you can just keep connecting. And the more we can detach good, bad, evil from money or God wanted us to have this and I'm not trying to impose on anyone's views I'm suggesting for a healthy money attitude. It can be helpful to understand what's true when we're exchanging it. Even if you want to apply a deity, you want to at least allow for the fact that the person on the other side might not be. So again back to money. Doesn't know or care who has it. Remember the tool nature of it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I know that's such good advice Because I've had these conversations with friends and it is. It's one of those. Growing up, my father owned his own business, so I helped him prepare taxes. I helped, you know like, put all the receipts together and do all that stuff.

Speaker 1:

So I was very comfortable with money, whereas my mom never talked about it, and so my parents got divorced, unfortunately, and you know the way that I saw, I didn't realize. I mean, I've always had respect, obviously, for my mom, but I didn't realize how much she did right. Until she wasn't there anymore. Yes, like with my dad, and he had to figure out how to even put together an outfit, you know.

Speaker 2:

Right, yeah, and I say I'm sorry, not because and we're not proponents of divorce in any way, shape or form. I really say it for the struggle that we all go through when we go through that transition. It's really important for people thinking about their divorcing friends, or if they're contemplating it themselves. When Dick and Jane make the choice to no longer be together. That's their choice and once they make that choice, I think the community whether it's people you hire or people you talk to has a responsibility to help them get to the other side of that as best we can. So there's a lot in their spiritual support and all kinds of support. But the money, because it's no one else's business and it could be so fraught with embarrassment or shame. Maybe we didn't save right, maybe I spent too much. There's so many things people put in it. There's a container around the dates of the marriage. That's what we're going to split and the end of that is just you know so, so, so we can stop making it worse than it is and just deal with it, and it doesn't have to go back to aspersions on either party, unless Dick or Jane is preventing it from finishing. That's where we spend too much time and we're always trying to convince Dick and Jane what we know to be true. The longer and harder we fight for something that's out of spite versus what Virginia or wherever we're standing would give us anyway, the smaller the numbers get. Always your choice, but there are things worth fighting for too. So Dick or Jane could be a bad actor, and then we have a responsibility to our children and to ourselves to get what's fair and fair. So there's so much history around divorce not being done well that I can imagine that anyone hearing me talk is going to those stories.

Speaker 2:

But I would just say it's a whole new world and people want to think about their money. I would say the missed opportunity is married. So we've got married people who don't talk about their money, which can sometimes set them up for a division, like we would encourage more married people to raise their hand and say one or both of us just doesn't have complete knowledge. So there's always this division of labor. Right, I'll do this, you do that. Perfectly understandable, but there's no reason in the world that both parties shouldn't have their retirement funded. Both parties shouldn't understand their healthcare. Both parties shouldn't have transportation that's reliable and safe. I mean, just go down the list. That's how we see it and if we could. I'm a big proponent of marriage and it's the things that it can do for us, especially for children, but if we don't figure out how to talk about money as a foundation in the marriage, I think we keep it less attractive.

Speaker 1:

Agreed, agreed. Yeah, and it is. It's a self-perpetuating cycle, right? Yeah, that's one of those things like all our habits, yeah, like everything, yeah, yeah, life is so much work, right, um, so to kind of tie into which we said we were talking about at the very beginning you talked about how, now you're at Dakota, you sold your business. I did tell me a little bit about that. I know you sold other one, another one as well, right?

Speaker 2:

I did. I sold my previous RA. I sold two RA's. The firm that I didn't sell was my tax practice. Um wasn't much to sell and I honestly hadn't considered the concept at that time early in my career. Um, but I did sell it and I also am a certified except planning advisor. The reason that's important is there's a lot of things about selling a business that you want to make sure you cover. What you learn as a SIPA before I sold my own firm is that most firms never sell. Most die on the vine. Most get pushed down to a family member. There may be some exchange of funds in that transfer, but it's shocking how many small businesses provide for a lifetime and build wealth and then we don't, you know, monetize that at the end.

Speaker 2:

And the process of getting a firm ready to sell, regardless of size if it has revenue that can be monetized, is to think through that right. So we're usually the thinking partner in that from a financial aspect. So if you're going to get, let's just use around number a million dollars at the end of the transaction. Of course it matters what you're going to do with that, but before we get there we want to think about could that million be a million five. Could that be true? How could that be true? So businesses like the house you want to sell have flaws and the goal before we sell is to understand the flaws. So we are having the firm appraised. So I had my firm appraised formally, paid the money, painful, paid the money to have it appraised in 2016. It was really helpful for me to see the warts because I'm thinking about what I'm, who I'm going to sell to and I want to make sure I cover those objections so I get the most from my hard work. So, 2016 to 2021, I had a nice five-year period.

Speaker 2:

When people get ready to sell their businesses, it can often be the case that they're doing it because they are done yesterday. Worst position to be in. You're going to get a lower price, if you can get a price at all. So what we're always thinking about. Back to big financial transactions how hard have you worked to make this baby grow up? Don't you want to be paid properly on the way out? Of course you do, so we want to get the baby as pretty as possible. Ugly babies, ugly babies get less money.

Speaker 1:

It's just a fact of life so that was what five years ish those five years from a price.

Speaker 2:

So the business was open in 2009, sold in 2021, but I got the appraisal in 2016 and and that was a growth factor right. So a small business, at some point you're able to pay yourself, you're able to pay someone else and or you're collecting so much wealth you're like this is a cash cow and probably valuable to someone else. I'm 63 at the time I'm considering this. Maybe I don't want to do this forever this way, taking on all the responsibilities I described earlier. Yeah, so why not sell it to someone? Make that grow if you're lucky enough to get a second swing, or just take off that responsibility. Do you know?

Speaker 2:

It remains an epiphany to me that you could do something else in this life with the breath we're given. That doesn't work. I have worked for 50 years, but even working before that is babysitting and so forth I have no. I mean, I had, prior to selling, really had no idea what to do with myself other than work. It's what I've always done. It turns out you can turn off monitors at five, you don't have to read email over the weekend, but as a business owner, you forget all those rules and you let all that in.

Speaker 1:

Okay, joanna what would you be doing if you hit the off switch for good?

Speaker 2:

Well, I worry about hitting the off switch. I might be built more like guys in this way. I worry that I would die early, so the off switch probably isn't an option, but I can do left turns and right turns. It would be hard for me to give up divorce because we haven't fixed it yet and I feel like there's more to do there. But I was given a writing class by my husband, who is desperate to see me do anything but work, and I used it, and I am in the class right now and I'm gonna try not to get emotional as I talk about the class. But a door has opened in my mind. Things that I had forgotten about for years, decades. Most of my being are coming back like a flood, and it's a memoir class. I don't know if this will ever see the light of day, but I'm around about 15 other people and one instructor who are fabulous souls that are helping me get my craft of writing better, which is the goal, not to get Bonnie's memoir out there.

Speaker 2:

Writing is so cathartic for me. I've always been writing, I have been lucky enough to be published, but this is an exploration of creating a story that's interesting for someone else. We all think our own stories are interesting, but now, if you're crafting it for someone else, this is taking so much mind energy. I feel 10 years younger. I just didn't realize. And now that my eyes have been opened to, you, don't have to work every day, all day, at one thing and that's all you could do. I'm like a kid in a candy store. I got my Library of Congress library card. I just don't know where this is gonna lead, but I'm annoyed that I didn't know about it earlier and I'm thrilled that I know about it now.

Speaker 1:

I'm excited. I wanna take this class now. You just sold it's.

Speaker 2:

Gotham Writers Workshop. Is this an online? It is online, Okay. So there's three different ways you can do it. You can take a short class. I didn't opt for that. This is a 10-week class. It's intensive. There are big responsibilities, both for writing and critiquing. You're part of the community for the 10 weeks and then you can also run up to New York and do an all day thing. Well, I don't write on demand, Just like I have trouble speaking on demand in a coherent way. So this was the right thing for me, but it's unbelievable. The people that I am meeting and listening to. They have different views of the world. They live in different parts. It's just. Oh. I'm so grateful to my husband for taking a chance on me. I really am. What do you mean by that? Well, because I think in my core, I just didn't believe I could do anything else but work, and it turns out I might be able to do something else besides work and it might have value to me or others. It's just thrilling.

Speaker 1:

You don't make me tear up.

Speaker 2:

It's. I'm way too late in life to have realized this, but I'm really glad that I have.

Speaker 1:

Wow, Like I'm so excited.

Speaker 2:

I'm excited for you.

Speaker 1:

I used to write as a kid, you know, and I stopped. So I'm like I wanna.

Speaker 2:

So this is a great point. How many things do we stop doing as we grow up? I stop singing, I stop dancing, I stop writing. Especially when we are no longer in a marriage where we have to think about another person's needs and wants all the time, it can be really freeing to start bringing those things back. So I hope you do.

Speaker 1:

We do.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1:

So, to wrap this up, what is what's your legacy gonna be on this world? What do you pray or hope?

Speaker 2:

I have messed up a lot of things, including my kids, probably. I would say I hope I have been a better person than a worse person most days that I was breathing. Something that has occurred to me that was daunting when I realized you didn't have to work all day was the idea that my work was important to me but may not have been important to everyone else. I definitely impacted lives, but it's humbling to realize what a speck we are in the world. I mean, I think I always knew that, but as far as a legacy, I feel like my time here is so short. I am working hard to make my time more valuable to others. I've been mostly a one-person deal for most of my life and I'm trying to risk involving others. I always thought I was being a burden when I did that. I'm trying to absorb that I might be able to help more if I do that. We'll see.

Speaker 1:

What message would you have for your kids?

Speaker 2:

The years go so slow and then they go so fast. Health, health, health health, open mind, love. I just think it's the basics, and when the basics slip away from you, put a stop, bring them back.

Speaker 1:

I like the hand gestures. Ha ha, ha, ha, ha, ha ha. Anything else you wanna add?

Speaker 2:

I would love to see more women build businesses that they wanna sell, so if you're wondering what that looks like, instead of a paycheck, we should either talk or you should think about exploring how that happens, because I see a lot of smart women build businesses maybe not for sale, but that can be the answer to a lot of financial needs and it's not out of reach.

Speaker 1:

Do you host any workshops or something like that?

Speaker 2:

You know, I haven't.

Speaker 1:

I have a list of like 10 to 15 people on the top of my head that three specifically have told me. Well, I guess when I retire I'm just gonna close that shop and be done.

Speaker 2:

Well, we should put together a workshop for that, because you know we do our divorce workshops every month and they are the reason people find us. It's an easy thing for us to do. It's mostly Q&A. If there's no charge, it's not a commercial. It's really to help them get their arms around the process. I'd be happy to do the same thing. I always like people to have some investment in the time. If we're spending our time doing that, so that could be a donation to something that's in the community. But I don't need their money for that reason. Be happy to share the knowledge, but I do think if that's holding someone up or if that's their conclusion, I'd love to see them revisit what it looks like. If you build something, you can sell.

Speaker 1:

I think they just don't know, it's a possibility.

Speaker 2:

It's a possibility, yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, alright, so we'll talk about setting up yeah. Let's do it. How can they find out more, though, if they watch this video and they want to?

Speaker 2:

So you could Google me. I'm so old I come under a couple different names the old Mary name and this one but I'm at Dakota WMcom and I will say, in addition to me, we have trust in estate people, tax people. We have, I think, one of the best lineups of people. So if I'm not your cup of tea, think about wealth management as it's practiced a little bit differently than you might be familiar with.

Speaker 1:

How could you not be everyone's cup of tea? You'd be surprised.

Speaker 2:

I know at least one person I'm not. Thank you so much. He's in Texas. Old news.

Speaker 1:

Thank you so much for being on the show.

Speaker 2:

Thank you, I appreciate it. I appreciate it. I'm grateful to speak with you.

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