The Alimond Show

Brianne Hendrick Owner & Interior Designer of Brianne Hendrick Interiors

March 27, 2024 Alimond Studio
The Alimond Show
Brianne Hendrick Owner & Interior Designer of Brianne Hendrick Interiors
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

When life handed her solitude and a search for purpose, one stay-at-home mom grasped the reins and galloped towards an entrepreneurial dream, transforming her passion for interior design into a thriving business. Our latest episode spotlights her compelling narrative, seamlessly weaving the threads of motherhood with the fabric of a career. Tune in to discover how she balanced nurturing her children with nurturing her ambition, and how her dedication to giving back has been woven into the very DNA of her company, leaving clients not only with exquisite living spaces but also with the warmth of contributing to a greater cause.

Witness the intimate impact a mother's professional journey can have on her children, as our guest opens up about the pivotal decisions that shaped her family's dynamics. From the decision to homeschool during tough times, to the pride her children hold in her accomplishments, this episode illuminates the powerful lessons imparted through her example. It’s a tale of resilience, with her transition from stay-at-home mom to innovative entrepreneur setting a poignant example of independence and hard work for her sons.

We also roll out the blueprint to creating spaces that resonate with personal style and functionality. Our guest dives into the importance of measured choices in home design, from selecting the right lighting to finding the perfect paint color. Plus, she debunks the myth of needing a flawless, magazine-worthy home, championing instead the beauty of embracing imperfections and crafting a space that brings joy. Whether you're shaping your own entrepreneurial path or just looking to add a more heartfelt touch to your home, this episode packs actionable insights and heartfelt advice to inspire your next steps.

Speaker 1:

I stayed at home with my kids for years so I didn't work and my husband is former federal law enforcement so he traveled a lot with his job and you know, being a state home mom with kids and him working and going a lot it was, it was really difficult. We moved a lot. I'm from Alabama but we were living in New Jersey at the time so I knew no one and just always kind of wondered what I was supposed to be doing. I mean, I think as a state home mom you kind of start going like there's got to be more than this than you know, changing diapers or whatever. So I decided to really start praying and looking for something to get involved with. So I looked on Facebook and a friend of mine was posting things about Africa and I called him and asked him about it and it was an organization that a former genocide survivor from the 1994 genocide in Rwanda had survived and he had come to America on a track and field scholarship. So they decided to start an on-profit to help the people in Rwanda, the kids like him. He really wanted to go back to his village and help the kids. So I got involved in that and just kind of went all in Again. I wasn't working at the time so I was really able to give a lot of time sharing about it, trying to raise money for it, just on a volunteer basis. But I was really passionate. I wanted my kids to see the importance of giving back.

Speaker 1:

And then we moved to Virginia and my husband was still still traveling. But we decided to put our kids in private school and so I really needed to work to pay for private school. So my husband said, well, you always I mean I had gone to school for interior design and he said you need to maybe call our friend down the road who was an interior designer. So I went to work for her for a year and that was wonderful. It reignited my passion for what I loved and what I've loved since I was a little girl which was doing design. And then after about a year of that, my husband's job was just so demanding. I felt like I was being pulled between mother and career. But my kids always win. So I felt like I wanted. I wanted them to always get the best of me. So it was hard to give up that job because I loved it so much. But again, I needed to be mom, and so I actually went to work for my children's school for a year and that was great. I mean, amazing people is wonderful, but when you're a creative and you're doing administrative work, it was super challenging because, while I'm an organized person, I wanted to be doing creative things. So, but I believe God's plan always works out, so I just kind of threw myself into that. But I was having a lot of health issues so and I feel like I'm jumping here and there and everywhere and it will all come together soon.

Speaker 1:

The story's a little long, but went to have surgery. I had been having a lot of issues and so I'd had successful hip surgery on my right hip when, in 2013 in New York, and really thought maybe by doing the left hip it would alleviate a lot of my pain, so went and did that and it did not take well. So I went from thinking that was going to help to actually going backwards and wondering if I would be able to work again, and the financial strain obviously was a lot, since I had to quit my job. So I was. It was just a really long it's about a year recovery, but at this point it turned into more like an 18 month recovery and my husband said well, you should. You know you can either. Why don't you go on disability? Because we have to have something and I just not that some people have to do that. But I just nothing in me and I'm hitting my mic, sorry nothing in me felt like that was the right thing. So it really felt more like it was time to take a leap of faith, to do something. So my husband said you do interior design. It's what you always come back to, so why don't you start your own interior design business? I didn't really believe I could, because I just, I mean, I really thought it's been too long. I've, you know, stayed at home with my kids so long. But I decided to take a leap and go for it. So I started my business. It was really, I think, the day after Christmas 2018. I bought my LLC and kind of went all in and just started doing it.

Speaker 1:

Word of mouth, but the one component that I wanted to change was I didn't just want to do design and let that just be it. I loved. This is where it comes back. Rwanda Children the, the organization I had been working for. I really wanted to be able to give them some benefit because of what I was being blessed with. So I decided to really combine it in the sense that whatever I give, I would just give a portion to them and that I would use my voice to share the story and the mission that we have.

Speaker 1:

And it's really interesting when I told my business consultant about it when I was starting the business, he just said nobody. He, he just said nobody cares. Nobody cares that you're doing that, people just want a pretty home. They don't care that you're doing nonprofit worker people in Rwanda benefiting. And I kind of just thought, well, I care, so I'm going to do it anyway. And if nobody cares, that's great, I'll still do a good job. And then I know I'll be sending money to an amazing cause.

Speaker 1:

And what I found is actually people do care, they hire me for the design. And then when I was doing the design, I was like I'm going to do it anyway. And then I was like I don't care, they hire me for the design. And then when I'm able to turn around and show them, kind of really what were the things that were able to do with just just that small amount it's. It really inspires them.

Speaker 1:

I've had clients who, once the project was over. They're thrilled with the results and they're so happy with the experience that they've even donated to that cause on behalf of my business. So it just feels like it's just this beautiful I'm able to really embrace really everything that I love which is helping people, doing design and helping the people in Rwanda and I guess, coming back to my health issues, you know it's taken a really long time, but just one step at a time I was able to get better and you know it's a continual thing always when you've got issues, but I've again. It was a leap of faith that I really kind of felt like God wanted me to take and I took it and I've been able to do it, even when it's not been easy. So, yeah, so that's the long version.

Speaker 2:

No, it's a beautiful story. Let's talk about your kids.

Speaker 1:

I have two boys, 19 and 13, and the oldest is going to Nova right now. He's decided he thought business and now he's changed his major, which is why we wanted him to do Nova, yeah, and so he is now gonna do kinesiology. So it's really neat. In fact, I told him this morning when he saw me working out. I said when you get your degree, you're gonna be able to tell me ways to even continue to get healthier and stronger and better. So and then my youngest is 13 and he's more of my art, creative spirit Like me. He's so much like me. So, yeah, he loves rock climbing. He's more, you know, he loves being outdoors. So definitely a full boy mom. I totally embrace it and I love it.

Speaker 2:

Now, have they said, anything about at any point in your journey where you reflected back and thought like, okay, I'm doing things right.

Speaker 1:

Yes, I think that's the hardest part of it as a working mom is you're moving forward. But I think the whole time you're kind of, you feel like you're making it up as you go almost, and you're hoping you're keeping those priorities balanced. Well, I'll even say last year. So last year was a really tough one because we pulled our son to homeschool and I am not a homeschool. I did homeschool one year when my oldest was six and quickly knew that was not my role. But we felt like it was really good for my youngest last year. So juggling, working I have a home office, so juggling that it was a virtual co-op. So he did really well and it's both of my boys are self starters.

Speaker 1:

And I'll say too my oldest when I first started going to work I think being a mom when I wasn't working, every problem my children had I was right there to help and I really felt like that was my role. But I think the most beautiful thing was when I noticed, when I started working, even though I had the guilt of am I giving them everything they need? Am I doing a disservice by not being able to do everything that I used to do? But I noticed my oldest started needing me less and less, and not in a I don't need my mom, but he started out. There were times I had to literally say, buddy, I can't help you right now. I need you to figure this out. You really are smart enough and I need you to do this.

Speaker 1:

And I've watched him. Now he started his own business when he was goodness 14, he started his own law and business. So I've watched him kind of take ownership of things more. I've watched him work hard for things. I mean, the value of a dollar is one thing my husband and I really tried to teach our boys, because it's hard work to be successful and it ebbs and flows. So we've.

Speaker 1:

It's just been good to see, yes, my oldest has taken it, as I've watched him become more independent, more self-aware and self-confident and my youngest really kind of took that too. He would say, well, I want to make my own money. So he would go, grab all of his things from his room and put a table outside and like, try to sell his toys to the neighborhood children. So I'm always it became a problem. Some of the parents were like he keeps coming to sell. I think our kids have bought all of his toys at this point.

Speaker 1:

But yeah, so I've watched both of my boys not only have to almost step up a little bit because I had to kind of go when I did go to work, but I've also watched their confidence improve. I've watched them say they're proud of me. Okay, this is when I almost get choked up, like even recently when I just relaunched a new website and they, when they saw all the pictures you know, I guess I assume they know what I do, but when my youngest especially who's the creative? Saw all the photos, he was like you did that, mom, you did that and he was. It was just again that he was very proud of me.

Speaker 1:

So again, that's there's always that mom balancing act with work and, you know, making sure you're there for your kids. But this was why I loved having my own business. It allows me to make the call and I don't have someone else saying, no, I'm sorry, you can't take your kid to the doctor today. It's, I'm gonna take off today because my child needs me or, you know, a friend needs me or whatever. It allows you the flexibility to do that. So that's been a, that's been a huge gift.

Speaker 2:

And one thing I love about running my own business and something you might not notice yet sounds like you kind of do is. It's funny how we as moms are hesitant on if we are taking away from our kids and are we doing enough? Are we being too selfish by wanting to?

Speaker 1:

work or needing to work.

Speaker 2:

But then sometimes later down the line. We have no idea how that affected our kids in the most positive way.

Speaker 1:

Yes.

Speaker 2:

Where they are more independent, where they do learn how, to you know, figure things out by themselves, solve their own problems, or even just see you as a role model to be like. Oh wow, like look at how accomplished my mom is.

Speaker 1:

Like.

Speaker 2:

I don't wanna just be some Joe Schmoe Like. I wanna live up to these expectations and that I've set for myself.

Speaker 1:

Yes, and it's been really good to. I think, like the fear of starting your own business, the fear of even if it's not starting your own business, the fear of taking on something new and believing in yourself while you still have self-doubt, it's just really all part of it. And I think what's been so good is I think before I had done this, it's not like I didn't know what I was talking about when I was telling my boys you know, you can do it, you're capable. But I think now I've, now I feel like I've lived it and now I'm able to pour into them. You can do this or it. You know. Yes, you're nervous, yes, it's new, but you are capable. And I think that's the one thing I've learned the most is and it's God's always brought someone into my life to speak into me when maybe I am having self-doubt or you know whatever. And that word capable, like I just had a lot of self-doubt and a sweet, sweet lady who was such a sweetheart I met her at that school. So again, you think it's this. You know you're veering off course when actually it's really all part of it. So, meeting those key, strategic people to speak into you, sometimes it feels like maybe you've gone backwards, but there's always a reason. There's always a reason. And she said to me brand, you are one of the most capable people I've ever met. And just that word, just those words just stuck. Because sometimes, when you don't believe in yourself and someone else truly believes in you, that's such a powerful, you know thing. So whenever I have self-doubt or whenever you know, as with any business owner, you start thinking am I enough? Am I whatever? Am I as good as I thought I was? Or you can always improve. So you know all of the self-talk. I always, just I hear her you are capable. So when things come up that seem bigger than maybe what I thought I could handle, I just go. I am capable, I can do this. Whatever is presented, I always figure it out, I figure out the best way forward. And really that's really what it's about, cause there's no way anyone could come into any industry and know everything at once. It's so much about learning and exploring and making sure you're doing the right thing for your client and finding those solutions to the problem. So that's the word that I use for my boys Capable, capable and my oldest, who's 19, and really turning into an adult you know, young adult still will call me with the panic calls.

Speaker 1:

What do I do, mom? I don't know what to say, and sometimes I'll catch myself. I'm about to tell him how to do it and then I go. You know what bud. You are capable of figuring this out. I really think you can do this. If you need my help, that's fine, I'll give you clues.

Speaker 2:

I'll give you clues. That's right. That's right.

Speaker 1:

Here's a clue. I'll speak in riddles, here we go. But yeah, so he now is, and I mean that one thing, I see it in him, him building the confidence of I don't have to have someone else. I really can figure this out for myself and I think on some days I'm like man. I wish I would have known this when I was, you know, a young mom, or 20, or 18. But I really believe it's why we speak into our kids. What we really, you know, I think, patent, what we learn the most, that we're the most passionate about, is stuff.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

That we turn and tell our kids whether that's good stuff or bad stuff. And I think the beauty of what I've learned through all of this I mean during the times of am I going to walk? Again like how am I going to run a business when I don't even know if I can walk? How am I going to it's? Interior design is a very physical business, but I mean shopping, lifting, and there are still times where I come up against something that I'm like this is going to be a lot, but it's been amazing because I also think you don't have to do this all yourself. So that's where assistance comes in. And you know, my contractors are all incredible. I've got an installer who is an amazing, just human and then does just an amazing job. So every little facet where I've thought I don't know how I'm going to do that, I figure it out and I'm the right person comes in and I just go okay, I don't have to worry about that and I'm just.

Speaker 1:

I'm a firm believer now of just. I am always working to be, be better, be smarter, be more successful, but not even defining that as financially successful I want. My top priorities are, I mean, my family is first and I always want to make sure I'm giving my top to them, and then what I found those. That doesn't take away from my business. It's a balancing act and sometimes you feel like one's moving, winning more than the other, but then you just go okay and there's times to pivot, but that's just because it's a moving target and life, life happens.

Speaker 2:

So tell me a little bit about the business structure model, how you've been able to grow your marketing all that fun stuff.

Speaker 1:

Well, the first, like I said, I think that first year was getting my feet wet back into it and being by myself. So I started by just doing really small things Paint consultations for Manor Works, painting locally. I do paint consultations for them. So I started by doing just little things helping someone pick out wallpaper or you know just hodgepodge and just decided to kind of take that leap and start getting back into doing renovations and found a really great contractor to work with, which is super important. So I decided to start doing that.

Speaker 1:

So it's kind of been a little bit of learning, because when you go out on your own, you don't have anyone to be like what do we do here? So I've got, yeah, I just kind of developed my team. I've kept it small again on purpose, in the sense of my kids, my kids being still at home, so that's why I keep my home office. But getting the right team was huge for me and I've kind of kept it, like I said, a little smaller over the past three years. And now that my youngest is 13, I'm like, okay, I think it's time. I think it's time now he is at a wonderful private school this year that he absolutely loves my oldest. They're both thriving, and so now I'm kind of like all right.

Speaker 2:

So the timing I can breathe. Let's do it.

Speaker 1:

So yeah, so right now, you know, I said let's rebrand. Really this is kind of the time of year for design, brought before the holidays. Everybody wants it done by November, and so this is really a great month. So I've been like I said, I've re-did my website, I re-did kind of everything, and the one thing that I'm passionate about and again I kind of go against what a lot of people say to me to do, which sometimes I'm saying is that stupidity or is that stubbornness, I don't know, but as far I try to really intuitively run my business, in the sense that there are projects that maybe somebody comes to me to do and I think it's. You know, it's not as much money as I would like to make, but something just tells me I really need to do this, for, you know, help this person.

Speaker 2:

Kind of like the guy, your business consultant that told you nobody cares.

Speaker 1:

Yes, that's it. So again, and I've learned along the way. There's some stuff where I go. Okay, I mean, I learned very quickly I can't do this for free. This is it's not a charity, and I know now my worth and some people might call and can't afford any services and that's okay. But there's also one thing that's different and that I really feel kind of set me apart was when I really decided my slogan would be you deserve to love your home and everyone really deserves to love their home. So I wanted to offer services. Obviously, my favorite is the top tier design service, where it's full service, where I come in and do everything from you know, picking out finishes and designing a floor plan, picking out all of selections, managing the product kind of like the big reveal that most people you know everybody dreams about, like you leave and then you come back in and your home's like, oh my gosh, so those are my favorite because those I really get to be more creative.

Speaker 1:

But I decided again not everyone can afford that level of service.

Speaker 2:

What is the price range for something?

Speaker 1:

like that For a room. It depends. I mean, it really depends on budget. If someone came to me and said you know I've got a living room, you know a 12 by 15 living room. That requires, you know, a sofa and two couches and a console table and a coffee table and lighting and styling, you know it just depends. If they say that is, you know, my budget's 40,000. You know, the hardest part is telling people design fees, because I know a lot of people go. You just all you do is pick out stuff Like it can't be that hard, but it's. Everyone likes shopping. Yeah, that's right. You get paid your. Yeah, but it's much harder than that. It's a game of inches. It's making sure all those finishes, you know, go together. So you know most for a full service room, I would say probably it ranges between five to 10,000 per room in design fees Again, which most people may be like what that's insane. It's actually not when you think of the hours. It's a lot of hours of work.

Speaker 2:

Service is sent for everybody. Yes yes, it's for people that have that, that specific style that you're going to bring in that want an expert to come in and make sure that it does look ACTV perfect or whatever.

Speaker 1:

Yes, and so for those who can't afford that service, I did a offer service. Now that is where I put together design, for that's from retail people, retail places that you can purchase online. I put off to where I put together the vision board and you can go, purchase the items yourself and implement the design yourself. And it's still a charge for me to do the design. But I'm not managing the whole product and project. You get to kind of put everything together and then at the end always tell people if you would. You know I also offer just hourly rated design service.

Speaker 1:

So once it's all there, if you go, okay, I need some judging like what do I need? It still feels like because it is that's the beauty of full service design is I'm the. I am hands on from start to finish, so I make sure every little detail isn't overlooked and it's that final styling that really makes the difference. But then for people who can't even afford the self managed, I decided to offer a service just for an hour of consultation, which is really kind of a lot of designers kind of shy away from that because you, you know we get paid a lot more money to do the higher end services. But I really, again, I just I have to be true to who I am and I thought I want people who can, maybe who can't, afford that full service, or even for me to pick out the product, for me to be able to go in their home and kind of guide them, kind of tell them this is what I, you know, this is what I would do, this is what I would avoid.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Move that here, um, you know. So it's that and again, it's not an inexpensive service. But for what you're getting, you're really kind of getting that trained eye and also just that second opinion, just to give you a lot of people just need lack the confidence. Like I always say, it's like analysis, paralysis, like I don't know what to do and I'm stuck, I'm just going to do nothing I'm going to do nothing and hate my room every day.

Speaker 1:

Yes, absolutely. So I say sometimes you just need that, that person to come in. So I started offering those and the, and I've got one client in Clifton that's just a repeat client. I mean it's kind of like when she gets stuck and I don't mind. You know I'm not making thousands and thousands of dollars off of that, but it's such fulfilling work for me to know that I'm also empowering her to make a beautiful home for her family.

Speaker 1:

So again it's it's very different than I would think. Then I think most designers run, but I'm just me and I'm like that's. That's what I'm passionate about is really making sure everybody, everybody can, can, yeah, have a beautiful home. And again I've had people say you really shouldn't do that. You need to focus on one thing, but this is really. I just kind of feel like it's a little bit of everything. If I can, I don't want to just feel like I'm only helping the 1%. I'm really passionate about really helping everybody, because there have been times in my life where I wasn't you know, we were struggling, and when someone was able to offer a service to me, that was super helpful. That maybe wasn't the high tier service that I would love to have purchased. It was still super, super helpful to to have somebody come in and have something that I could do.

Speaker 2:

Oh yeah, yeah. So in terms of talking about which, by the way, I think that's amazing because, even if it's just that, when our our consult on a business marketing side, hopefully they are your biggest cheerleaders, they are the ones that will go and spread the word or online will lose the reviews.

Speaker 2:

So I think that it's smart from just a purely selfish marketing business development mindset, but then for the fact that you're your own business owner and you want to be able to make those decisions of like, yeah, no, I want to feel like my work is fulfilling a person, a population, a demographic, a country a group of people that need that extra help. I think that's one of the best reasons of being a business owner.

Speaker 1:

Yes, yes.

Speaker 2:

In terms of consultation. So can you give me three tips that you find yourself saying again and again when it comes to how to create that perfect space for you?

Speaker 1:

Absolutely. Yeah, the, probably the, oh, there's so many. Probably the biggest thing is take your home as a whole. Don't just kind of go out shopping willy nilly and go to home goods and just I see that, I like that, let's grab this and listen.

Speaker 1:

I even have to go shopping and go like what is the purpose of this, where is this going to go? And I always say, even if you don't have a style per se, more and more people are getting away from a specific style. So always and I'm very much the one thing I also am really big on is helping my clients define their style. So I don't begin that by saying you know not just what colors do you like, those things, I say what do you love? Because your home and this is even when we did renovated our home over the last few years what do you love? Your home doesn't need to be a place that when you walk in you go like I like that. That's fine. I found this at HomeGoods for $5. Again, if it was amazing and you were like I absolutely love it, get it. But even if you can't do it quickly, it is so much wiser to do things slowly over time. As women, that drives us crazy. But it purchasing with intention is probably the best thing. So like and not after the fact. It's not after the fact that you know you go to Creighton Barrel, you get a $4,000 sofa and then you get a home in your house. It's way too big for the space. Take time. Take the time to really make sure it fits. Take measurements. That's probably the biggest thing. Don't rush it. If you know, that's where I come in. If somebody wants to rush it, that's what I do. I come in, we've figured out, we get it done and then you know in a few weeks or a few months it's done and it's beautiful. But if you can't do that service, it's taking it a little out of time.

Speaker 1:

The second thing I would say is lighting. I think that's probably the most challenging for people is you know, my hallway is dark, my basement's dark. Let's change the paint color and that's the first thing people want to do. But paint reflects light, so it's really backwards. What you want to make sure you do first is get your lighting done well, make sure you have enough lighting in the space, make sure your bulbs. I think the biggest thing and it depends Some people love that kind of warm glow kind of when you walk in a room. But when you put those warm yellow light bulbs in a basement, that's where, when you walk, you're feeling you're in a dungeon.

Speaker 1:

You walk down and it kind of feels like it's closing in on you Again. If you're going for a speakeasy vibe, that's great. If you're not, then change the light bulbs. Change the light bulbs, then select the paint colors. And I would say, third, goodness the one.

Speaker 2:

That's why the way I've never heard that and that's so brilliant. Even when you go into, like the Home Depot, those, they've got the, the different light bulbs. Yes, you know, like the, you can see how it's a whole different world.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, and it's it's very nuanced, it's very challenging, so it's not as simple of just like go, go get bulbs. But I always say keep your lighting consistent through your home as much as possible. And dimmers, you know, dimmers are wonderful for spaces, so let's like for ours. I love having the ability to. When I'm having a party or having people over, the lights are really high. It feels high energy. But I've also got something on stuff on dimmers, so I can dim it when I, when it's so I don't feel like I'm on a runway, when I am kind of wanting that cozier vibe. So dimmers, light bulbs, probably make the biggest difference. Do that before anything, before you pick paint. And I would say maybe I'll end with maybe.

Speaker 1:

The third one is paint colors. Paint colors are tricky. There are some people go it's just paint and some people have panic attacks about painting. So I would say paint is not something to get so emotionally involved with. It can really stress people out. So I kind of use this analogy it's you know, if you get a paint deck and you see hundreds of colors, it's super overwhelming. If you look at that paint deck as you're looking for your spouse and there is only one in there and you have to find that one spouse or that one paint color. And until I find that, what paint color? It's gonna be terrible. That's just not the case. The thing is there are many paint colors that would look beautiful. It all comes back to what are you going for before I paint this wall? What is the end result? It's like a cream flavor.

Speaker 2:

Yes, it's flavors.

Speaker 1:

Absolutely, I would say because I'll even show you know, I'll show someone four or five colors and they'll say which one do you like best? I'm like it's not my house. Yeah, I love all of these are beautiful. What do you when you see these colors, which one do you see? I love that color because all of these will work right here in this space. It's your home. What do you want to do? And then test the paint color? Always get, because those little ones are great, I mean the paint decks, but they've got free. You know, a lot of times Benjamin Moore and Sheryl Williams in a lot of places will have larger samples that you can purchase or even get free and put it on the wall. Those samples are better, just so you don't have to go get the court. You know, just have the gazillion, the funniest one.

Speaker 1:

I went to and this was right when I started my business. I say it looks like a paint murder scene. I went in this lady's house and that was right when kind of grays were really at the peak, yeah. So she was like I want a gray that brightens the space. So I walk in and I promised there were probably 60 gallons at least, all piled up on a wall and there were swatches like painted chili.

Speaker 2:

Slayble them so she knows which one, I don't know what her system was, but it was going up the hallway.

Speaker 1:

It was in the room and I was. I was thinking you don't need me like one of these or maybe she does.

Speaker 1:

Well, I was thinking any of these that I would choose you. If you're this neurotic about paint color, you're not gonna like anything. I choose because, like I said, you kind of have to take the emotion out of it. But the one thing I told her was lighting. None of these look good because you're lighting. You have no overhead lighting in this room, so everything is being so you're trying to brighten it with the gray, when it was probably the light, exactly.

Speaker 1:

So if you're, it all comes back. If you're brightening your room with paint, it's not gonna work. Now it can if you've got the right lighting it will help, but that's, that's probably. So. Paint lighting probably the biggest things and just furniture arranging, just making sure the pieces work how they need to work. Yeah, and my last, probably the biggest thing is think how you want your room to function.

Speaker 1:

Rooms function how you tell them to function. If you have a room and you put a rug and two beanbags in it, people walk in and they're just gonna sit on those beanbags, plop on those. They're gonna plop them on a beanbag. If you want a reading nook and you decide to put a desk over the desk chair and then you decide to put a conversation room, you know area with four chairs, that's what people will use the room as. So instead of kind of walking and saying, what, what is this room like? A especially formal living rooms now, and nobody uses them. So really, it's a great time to get creative, to kind of what do I want to use this room for? So those, yeah, your rooms will function how you tell them to function.

Speaker 2:

And that's totally true. I just recently updated my bedroom and I wanted it to be more like in the evenings. We go to bed early, but I want us to like hang out as a family.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yeah.

Speaker 2:

And before it was like one kids in his room, the other kids in their room, and I didn't like that. Yes, and so I put up a really which I don't want to be, but I put up a big TV up in my room, mm-hmm, right above the bed or in front of the bed. Yes, I put a little couch right next to the bed, and so now, for the past like three, four days, the kids all gather in my room, get under the blankets.

Speaker 1:

And that's what it's about. I mean, it really is my clients, the one thing I love. I really try to make it like a fun experience, like we really the sky's the limit. What do you want your house to be when? What do you love to do with your kids? Where are your favorite places to travel?

Speaker 1:

You know people who have a love for. You know I have a client in Willisford that had loves tropical locations, but her style was kind of more modern. Farmhouse is really what she loved. But for the powder room we found like this wallpaper that was so awesome and kind of was like a modern farmhouse, tropical, like we made it work and found this beautiful shell chandelier that really made a statement. And now that's not. It's not just beautiful, it really reminds her of kind of their favorite thing to do as a family, which is to go to the beach, to go to tropical locations. So yeah, those kinds of things is making it.

Speaker 1:

How do we want to do this? And I always say function really is before aesthetics, because it can be beautiful, but if it does not function well, it's not gonna be. You know, you're not gonna enjoy it as much, because nobody just wants to sit in a static room. I mean, some people do, some people do, but then just think this is just beautiful if it doesn't make them feel a certain way or if it doesn't like, especially with kids, like you do. You want your kids to feel like it's home and that's probably my greatest compliment. Even at my own home I can look around and think, oh, I'd like to do that couch over and let's do this over. But when I look I see my kids, everyone and people come, they just jump on this couch and the biggest thing everyone says is your house just feels like home, probably.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Speaker 1:

It just feels warm and cozy. And I have crazy stuff on those. I mean, with all of my trips to Africa, like that's one of the things I, when I went to do my own home, I was tempted to be like, what color do I like? And I was like, no, what do I love? I love Africa. I love helping people. I love my grandmother's piano, which is not at all tribal looking, so we just painted it black so it would work with everything.

Speaker 2:

So my home is filled with a hodgepodge of pieces that means something Looking into tour of your house now, huh Well, come on we'll do it on scene next time.

Speaker 1:

But nothing in my home is precious other than the pieces that were passed down. Those are the ones that are precious to me, those are the ones that I look at and it really is. It's my family, it's my mom and my dad and their parents, and even if it's just small little things, that's what makes it feel like home, because it doesn't look like a perfect, it doesn't look like a perfect house, it looks like a home and it's got conversation starters and things that people say what is that? And I'm able to share the story with it. So that's when it's fun. That's when it's really fun, when you get to that level.

Speaker 2:

It's like an adventure, for sure, for sure, which is what I try to do.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, yes, which is what I really like. I said I feel passionate about doing helping people. Yeah, I always say I don't wanna work myself out of a job because that would not be good, but I really do. When I help clients, I really feel like sometimes, especially if all they can do is afford for me to do one or two rooms or even one room, I do it in such a way where, if they can't afford me for the next one, they've at least know, they've seen the process, they know now like okay, okay, I remember she was. She wanted us to do stuff we love. Don't just say do I like this, do I love this? And that steers me even when I'm working with clients.

Speaker 2:

Sounds like you got a little course in. You like a self-help course.

Speaker 1:

Yes, there you go, there you go. Actually, that is something that I'm actually working on for 2024. So, yes, yeah, because this is the stuff that I think most people they just need the confidence to go Like. It doesn't have to look perfect, it really isn't, and if you love it, that's really what's most important.

Speaker 1:

Yes, not everybody's house was meant to be in a magazine. That's just not what, that's not realistic, it's not what everybody has. But everybody deserves to love their home and to come home and feel like it's full of stuff that they love to look at.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I love that. Yeah, Thank you so much for being on the show. Absolutely yes, it was a blessing.

Speaker 1:

Thank you, thanks for having me and, yeah, I appreciate it. Next time tour at your house Absolutely sounds good. Thank you, thanks.

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