The Alimond Show

Seth Wolfe Founder & Head Coach of Tru Strength Gym

July 18, 2024 Alimond Studio
The Alimond Show
Seth Wolfe Founder & Head Coach of Tru Strength Gym
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

When a personal health crisis became the catalyst for monumental change, our latest guest, the owner of Tru Strength gym, didn't just transform his body; he built a sanctuary for growth, resilience, and community. His narrative isn't solely his own—it's a reflection of every individual who walks through his doors, from the daunted newcomer to the seasoned lifter, all finding common ground in their pursuit of wellbeing. Together, we unpack the narrative of his gym's evolution, from its modest inception to becoming a local cornerstone that champions the personal over the competitive, and witness the profound effects of nurturing a space where encouragement reigns supreme.

This episode isn't just about sweating it out on the mat; it's a symphony of stories that resonate with anyone looking to leave a mark on the world or their own lives. We tackle the pervasive myths that keep too many people from taking that first step towards fitness, revealing how Tru Strength operates as an antidote to the intimidation factor that often shadows gym culture. The conversation extends beyond the gym floor to the essence of entrepreneurship—where the grit required to sculpt a body is mirrored in the tenacity to build a business from the ground up. Tune in for an inspiring blend of life lessons, where our guest's dedication to fitness and enterprise offers a masterclass in perseverance, community building, and the pursuit of legacy.

Speaker 1:

It's called what?

Speaker 2:

It's called true strength.

Speaker 1:

Okay, tell me a little about that.

Speaker 2:

So it's like functional fitness. We do group classes, personal training, like sports training, and that's a lot of fun. We got like over a hundred members and every age and background that you can think of.

Speaker 1:

What inspires you to do this Cause? That's like a big operation.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, it's a big operation but it's a lot of fun. So I was inspired just because fitness changed my life and I was like, hey, have it changed my life and where I was at and when it got me out of that kind of funk. I'm sure it could help a lot of other people.

Speaker 1:

All right, I got to tell me about the funk and the changing life story.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I was drinking and partying a lot and so, like put a lot of weight, and I remember when I had my daughter it was a long time ago, but I saw pictures of myself when I was so unhealthy and unhappy and I was like I don't want to be remembered for that Cause.

Speaker 2:

I know people that have gone too early and they're left with that legacy of maybe like they could have tried a little bit harder, done a little bit different, and so for me it was like fitness started to get me out of that. I was an athlete when I was a kid, growing up, got injured and then I, when I got injured, I really got into like the party scene and having fun and doing all this stuff, but I let myself the physical part down. And then, once you let the physical part down, it just it's like a domino effect. There's so many other things that are affected by your physical that if you don't get a hold of it, you're in a really negative spot really quick. And so being able to kind of get control of that and just start to see the changes in my life and how it affected not only my life but the people's lives around me, it was easy to like to be inspired, to try to chase this dream and make it happen.

Speaker 1:

What were the? That's an amazing story, by the way. What were the like first couple of steps you had to take?

Speaker 2:

Probably the first couple of steps was like some realistic goals or like just started to be consistent. I think that's like the number one goal, like I tell anybody to get started. It's like it's a consistency and it's like if you can start to be consistent, you start showing up. Start showing up for yourself, start showing up for your family, start showing up for work. Like you just start showing up. That's probably like the hardest thing but also the easiest thing to start to really move that needle in the way you want it.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, consistency, it's like all things in life right, that's it.

Speaker 2:

So you just got to do it. If you don't want to, just got to do it.

Speaker 1:

How old is your daughter now?

Speaker 2:

16.

Speaker 1:

Okay, I'm here. I've got a 16 year old too.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, so it's pretty crazy. So now we're doing the whole driving thing and she's got her license.

Speaker 1:

Does she have a car? Not yet, but we're working on that.

Speaker 2:

Right now we're just working on.

Speaker 1:

Terrified of getting in the car with her.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, trying to get through that and back and forth to the gas stations or Starbucks or something.

Speaker 1:

There we go.

Speaker 2:

Through drive-thrus and just learning a little bit.

Speaker 1:

Where do you see the vision for your business?

Speaker 2:

I like to keep it growing. I mean, we've been around now that we're going into like our eighth year of business and we're growing and it's like really affecting our smaller community, but eventually I'd love to see it impact other communities. So that could be a licensing deal or being able to have the right people in place where I could go to another community that could use what we're doing up there too.

Speaker 1:

How are you guys different, like what type of people are attracted to your gym.

Speaker 2:

Um, I would say we're different and its community builds a lot of the places and that's kind of what it always seems like. It's a little bit different, but we have just people that are really caring and motivated to invest time in their self, and when you get a lot of people that are doing that same thing, it becomes a really caring community and it's very accepting. And so we have people that are in physical disabilities, mental disabilities, all the way up to high functioning people that are super smart and super athletic and everything in between. So that alone is unique and it gives us a nice look at, like, the area that we're in, because we have a really diverse community that we live in and it's small in our gym at the same time, but it's very diverse as well. So I think it's just the way that we're in. We're unique in that aspect.

Speaker 1:

You're in Asperin, right? Yeah, we're in Asperin, we're part of Asperin.

Speaker 2:

We're right off of Belmont Ridge, so like on the back end of Asperin, so pretty much between here and Leesburg, or you know Ashperin and Leesburg, but the Belmont Green Shopping Center.

Speaker 1:

Cool, yeah, it's not too far. So you don't strike me as the like type of like gym guy.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I've never been everybody's like you're so chill. Sometimes I'm like, yeah, because you can still be like that, like I don't want to fake it right. One is, I'm really interested and concerned with making sure everybody that comes into the gym leaves better than they they came in. And so if you get to a gym and somebody's like yelling at you all the time and stuff one it can. We're dealing with other things outside of our life and we don't need to bring that stress sometimes into the gym.

Speaker 2:

I'll try to motivate people, I'll try to inspire people, but I'm not gonna yell at people and I do it all day, so I don't have the energy to just sit there and yell at people. I wouldn't want to either, because it's a place of joy for me and I'm hoping that when people come into the gym it becomes a place of joy and not fear like you're gonna get yelled at if you don't do the move completely right. I'm more about like you come in there and you're trying your hardest. There's effort behind it. The consistency is there. Like today might not be the best day because I don't know what people are dealing with on the outside of their life. We're all dealing with a little bit of something. So it's we want it to be a peaceful place.

Speaker 1:

I'll say that message definitely, I'm sure, resonates with a lot of people, and it's not a, it's not what you hear all the time when it comes to like the owner of a gym either.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I think I mean a lot of times. I think there is that intensity that's needed as well. So there's a happy mix, but for the most part, like I said, it's like we want it's real life. So we don't want to just come in and if you're faking it, if I'm faking it, I'm yelling at you to just go, go, go and it's like maybe you just need to be here with us right now and sweat a little bit and like get through your day and like, hey, come back tomorrow. And like try harder tomorrow and every day. If we build that and we keep that intensity, it becomes that almost natural where I'm not the one yelling. Sometimes maybe it's somebody like that we're working on in a group and somebody else is yelling like hey, come on. It's like okay, like that's what they're feeling. But for me it's like I kind of like I just want to be really natural with it and like what it feels like, and so for me it's not yelling at people, it's encouraging them in a different way.

Speaker 1:

And it helps those type of people be more consistent, because they're actually going to want to show up versus people have a good time.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, most of the time it's like a social club and do the workout as well.

Speaker 1:

That's right, that's very cool it's good fun. What type of people now? How many people work at your company?

Speaker 2:

I do pretty much everything.

Speaker 1:

You're like one man.

Speaker 2:

I'm like a one man operation.

Speaker 1:

Oh man.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I've been doing it for a long time, but I it's definitely like a lifestyle for me. I do have other coaches that help out and people that help out here and there, but on a consistent basis. I'd like do 99% of the stuff.

Speaker 1:

Oh wow, that's amazing. Yeah, it is, and it really feels good to be able to keep everything in control and intact, because yeah sometimes.

Speaker 2:

So I mean it's like as we grow, you know that those roles need to be spread out. And I myself, and working on those kinds of things where it's like, you know, delegating things or asking people for help, like I enjoy working hard, so it doesn't bother me as much as I think some people if, like they're like maybe if they're going with the wrong, different mindset of owning their own business or something like that, like I actually enjoy working hard and like I would rather be working hard than not working, and so to do most of the stuff myself is kind of enjoyable. But at the same time, as I said, as we grow, we're looking for people to step up and take other roles and responsibilities and we have a lot of good people in our community that want to help with that.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, what are? That's good to hear. What are like three misconceptions that people have about getting in shape?

Speaker 2:

I would say the first one would be they have to get in shape before they get in shape. I always hear that like people are like oh I got to do you know I'll start Like tomorrow, or these different things.

Speaker 2:

I think that's one is like you just got to start where you're at. I think a lot of people get that. And then some of the strongest people that I know are the happiest people and the nicest people, and so sometimes you'll get that like intimidation factor. Maybe you don't come from athletic background or you don't never been in the gym and you go into a spot and everybody like looks like they've been there a long time or they know what they're doing. And those people that if you're at a good spot with people that are mentally take care of themselves and put themselves forward and trying to do this, most of us are really looking out for other people too and like, because we know that the impact that it has on everybody, so they're encouraging and I think a lot of time people won't step into an area where they don't feel comfortable, so it's like just leaving that at the door.

Speaker 2:

And then probably the other one is like hard work is you're supposed to do hard work?

Speaker 2:

I think like if anything is like the more you put in, the more you're going to get out, and so I know in our society people have decided. You know it's like we get more and more less work or want to get like get rich quick, or you know, take a pill and like that stops me from getting bad, or something like that, where it's like that stuff, that stuff works, you know, to a certain extent, but what really works is hard work and dedication and commitment. And you know consistency and like those things stacked together could really make a difference. And so it's like challenge yourself a little bit, like we all have more in us than we think we do, but we just need to challenge ourselves or get around people that are open to challenge themselves and then you'll rub off on them. And that's why the community aspect of working out works a lot, because people get inspired by other people and we're all doing something. It's a lot easier than if you're doing it alone.

Speaker 1:

It's contagious. Yeah, it's contagious. So do you have any comments, like from your family, about the journey that you've been on? Did they ever say, like dad, it'd be nice for you to be home more?

Speaker 2:

Yeah, definitely. I mean. Yeah, I think anything in life is a sacrifice, you know, and so there's been a lot of those sacrifices, you know, along the way and I'm stuck to any business owner I'm sure that they have the same stories and they parallel each other, no matter what industry it is, because when you start your own business, you're trying to breathe life into an idea and stuff like that, and so by doing that, at first it's like it might seem like a dream, but sometimes those dreams they do cost a lot of sacrifice and stuff. So there's definitely, you know, comments that come and go and different things like that. But I hope, at the end of my time and then in my life and when I'm hoping to leave a legacy of like, hey, you know what, like go after what you think is right and try to make an impact on the world or your community or, you know, the society and whole, and then potentially leave something for my kids and my family and, you know, change some standards in my life and hold everybody else accountable too.

Speaker 1:

That's beautiful. What is like one of your biggest tribulations or challenges that you've gone through on your business journey.

Speaker 2:

I think probably the biggest one would be like not knowing what you don't know. So I think a lot of times when people go into a business or anything that they don't really know, it's like you jump in and you don't know what you don't know. And so I think there's a lot of that stuff like dealing with licensing and permits and taxes and all these other things. When you know you, maybe you think it's like, oh, it's such a shiny thing. At the end You're like I'm just gonna get there, but you don't realize how much that you don't know and how much growing that has to take place, from where that dream is and like to actually bring it out and to make it happen.

Speaker 2:

There's a lot of that stepping stones that you have to go through, and I think that was probably and is one of the biggest trials and tribulations, because along the way a lot of people they quit, you know, because it does get hard and if you quit before you get to that end goal, you know it might not be worth it. And so I think it's that trials of every day, like hey, you might not be where you're at, it's just like in fitness, it mirrors itself really close, and so I'm lucky to kind of see the like being in a business that deals with, you know, the physical transformations is the same way that it does in the business. Right, where there's consistency there has to be, there has to be things where it's like I didn't know that it was even a thing you know and like let me start implementing this in my life or maybe they change things that in your life that aren't working to help you get towards your goal. And I think those daily trials are awesome. That to compare with business and in the gym.

Speaker 1:

What is your favorite workout move? Like somebody's trying to get fit. What's like your go-to Go-to?

Speaker 2:

The one I really like, because I mean it's burpees Everybody hates them, I hate.

Speaker 1:

I was hoping you would say that I know everybody hates them. I think that's why I like them so much. Because I'm like everybody hates them. I'm like I'm much more. You said you have a kind community, you know.

Speaker 2:

I do, but I'm a little evil too. So there's that mix because, like the burpee is, it works the whole body. It's quick, you could do it anywhere. There's no skis.

Speaker 1:

It's very struggling.

Speaker 2:

you see the sweat flying, yeah, and even if you're doesn't matter if you're a super athlete and you're really good, like your burpees would just look a little more intense and impressive and fluid and fluid versus like maybe it's your first time doing burpees Somebody like me when you're crawling up and down.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and it's like you're both getting a good workout, so it's like there doesn't need to be an equipment change. There doesn't have to be like stuff like that. So I like stuff like that you can actually do pretty quick, and then besides that would be like some squats.

Speaker 1:

I think everybody could do squats Get that booty in shape and his thighs, yeah you get it all.

Speaker 2:

It makes you feel strong and everybody loves squats. Yeah, that's fun.

Speaker 1:

Okay, well, I'll accept the burpees and the squats as they're some good moves In terms of, if you had just to kind of wrap it up here, if you had one piece of advice that you could share with the world, what would that advice be?

Speaker 2:

I always think people need to believe in themselves more and like have more faith in themselves. I think we are our worst enemy and our worst critic and all these kinds of things, and you have to do the work to really speak that over your life, that you're more than that, and I think if everybody could take more time to do that and then we speak that onto other people as well, I think we could really change society. Cause I think there's a lot of the, there's plenty of things in life that tell you that you're not good enough, and so we got to be like they're our number one fan. And a lot of times I catch myself, even when I'm feeling down, and something like, hey, manly, you got this, you're doing good, like you're confident, you're happy, you're healthy. You know, I think we, I think people, need to do that more.

Speaker 2:

I don't think we do it enough and I think we get stuck in the day to day and things go wrong and we start to beat up on ourselves because those little voices in your head can tell you're not doing everything right or you're not where you want to be and stuff. And I see a lot of people along their journey of fitness. Maybe they give up on themselves before they get there because they haven't got that mindset yet, and so I wish people could get that a little bit earlier and start to become their biggest fan and maybe not compare where they used to be or what they're, where they want to be and just where they're at be present, and then build that confidence. And once you can start doing that, you can really affect other people as well, because you feel good about yourself and even if you're, even if it's a little lie, that's okay. You can make it happen, you can lie about it.

Speaker 1:

I was going to say I kind of want to double down on that just really quickly here. How do you become confident? I was having a conversation with a friend the other day how do you become confident without the confidence?

Speaker 2:

That's a hard one, you know, but I think it is starting to believe like, hey, like what I'm doing today and stacking little wins a lot of that time, that helps a lot. Like you set an alarm and you get up when your alarm goes off. You know when when it gets off. It's like you don't hit snooze or you set those little things up, but that's a win of the day.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's one win.

Speaker 2:

And then you like you stack that and it's like okay, and then what else can you do?

Speaker 1:

Or like got to work on time.

Speaker 2:

Got to work on time, that's a good win. Or it's like, hey, if I'm struggling with my weight and different things, like, like, take the time to make your own food, you'll feel better about it, you know. And then that confidence builds like, hey, you know, I didn't spend $20 out at lunch today. Like I brought my food and I ate it, and like that's a win. And it's like, hey, it's like when you start to, when you start to do that and you start to listen to yourself, you start to trust yourself. I think, like confidence and trust are really tied into each other, right? When I trust myself to do something that I said I was going to do, that helps build my confidence. And so it's like starting to be a little bit more self-aware and start to trust yourself or even set those little little goals up.

Speaker 2:

Like hey, like today, I'm going to read that one page in that book. You know, I've been walking around with it in my bag for six months and I just need to read one page. If I can read one page now, I'm a little bit more confident that I can read the next page. And then it makes me it's two pages and three pages, and the same thing works with, I think, a little bit of everything. It's just taking those small wins and then starting to build on it, and then the more you build on it, like and then rewarding yourself and like, hey, I'm doing good, like you know, tracking that stuff, like I know listening, listening to people that are inspiring, stuff like this podcast and stuff. It's like I spent a good amount of my time listening to some podcasts of people who are really inspiring because they inspire you as well and they preach a lot of the same things. It's like you know believing yourself, like you can build that confidence, and so I hope that would be, that'd be the way.

Speaker 1:

I love that. I like the stacking, the wins, what you just said, and then trusting yourself. I think they're building doing things that you said you're going to do and that builds trust. And then that helps stack on confidence because you're like I'm not breaking these little promises to myself, because I'm getting up on time, I'm eating healthy, I got to work on time, I'm getting my work done. How can you not feel like a baddie?

Speaker 2:

You know, like starts to build, you know, and so it's like just those little actions. And then you know, you do you. Once you start to trust yourself, you become confident, because then the thoughts that you have can be true. You know, I was like, hey, I'm thinking that and I trust myself. Like it can be true, you know, and then it can make it happen, yeah.

Speaker 1:

Awesome. Thank you so much for being on the show, oh thanks for having me so many wins for you today.

Speaker 2:

This is awesome.

True Strength
Misconceptions About Getting in Shape
The Power of Hard Work