Making Coffee with Lucia Solis

#22: Terroir—Part II: Yeast, Bacteria & Transparent Coffee Processing

July 14, 2020 Lucia Season 1 Episode 22
Making Coffee with Lucia Solis
#22: Terroir—Part II: Yeast, Bacteria & Transparent Coffee Processing
Chapters
Making Coffee with Lucia Solis
#22: Terroir—Part II: Yeast, Bacteria & Transparent Coffee Processing
Jul 14, 2020 Season 1 Episode 22
Lucia

Welcome to the next installment of terroir in coffee.

This one little word contains a whole world of history and has an important role in the economic viability of certain agricultural products.

After the last episode I heard from some of you who wished I had talked about soil minerals and plant nutrition from soil. Others also asked about the wine making regions like Bordeaux where Terroir is regulated by french law. I cover both of these concerns in todays episode before we get to discuss what I really wanted the episode to be about: microbes and morality.

There is an unspoken understanding that products that express terroir are more moral than others.

I wanted to give you an episode that focused on microbiology, that talked about the yeast and bacteria that contribute to a "taste of place" but I couldn't do it without including the human perception that products that express terroir, products that are "transparent" are superior.  

I think we need to be really careful because science doesn't support this view. Any moral component of terroir is a choice to see it through a religious and political lens.

I want to challenge your views on "transparency" and "intrinsic quality".

To pick future podcast topics, get access to the scientific papers, ask questions that I answer on the podcast, and help me continue making episodes: consider supporting the show by Joining Patreon Here



Mentioned on the podcast:

The historical origins are from the book Terroir and Other Myths of Winegrowing by Mark A Matthews.

How to Use a Pressure Chamber

Demeter Fragrance Library

Show Notes

Welcome to the next installment of terroir in coffee.

This one little word contains a whole world of history and has an important role in the economic viability of certain agricultural products.

After the last episode I heard from some of you who wished I had talked about soil minerals and plant nutrition from soil. Others also asked about the wine making regions like Bordeaux where Terroir is regulated by french law. I cover both of these concerns in todays episode before we get to discuss what I really wanted the episode to be about: microbes and morality.

There is an unspoken understanding that products that express terroir are more moral than others.

I wanted to give you an episode that focused on microbiology, that talked about the yeast and bacteria that contribute to a "taste of place" but I couldn't do it without including the human perception that products that express terroir, products that are "transparent" are superior.  

I think we need to be really careful because science doesn't support this view. Any moral component of terroir is a choice to see it through a religious and political lens.

I want to challenge your views on "transparency" and "intrinsic quality".

To pick future podcast topics, get access to the scientific papers, ask questions that I answer on the podcast, and help me continue making episodes: consider supporting the show by Joining Patreon Here



Mentioned on the podcast:

The historical origins are from the book Terroir and Other Myths of Winegrowing by Mark A Matthews.

How to Use a Pressure Chamber

Demeter Fragrance Library