Heat Press for Profit

1: KC Swagger – Moving from Side Hustle to Full Time Business

November 20, 2019 Gina Seibel of KC Swagger Season 1 Episode 1
Heat Press for Profit
1: KC Swagger – Moving from Side Hustle to Full Time Business
Show Notes Transcript

This episode features Gina Seibel of KC Swagger. Gina is an entrepreneur who has made the jump from side hustle to full time business owner. Since starting in 2015 Gina has experienced growth every year.  Learn more about her journey into printing and what has made her successful, including practical marketing tips for beginners. 

Speaker 1:

Welcome to the Stahls' Heat Press for Profit podcast. The show designed for people who are trying to make it in their heat print hustle. I'm your host Josh Ellsworth. I like tee shirts, I know how to print them and I know a thing or two about running a successful business while doing it. I guess that qualifies me to consume the next 30 minutes of your time and if not this episodes guest certainly will. We're excited to welcome Gina Seibel business owner of KC Swagger. Gina is a self proclaimed crazy tee shirt lady who has successfully made the jump from side hustle to full time business. Gina, welcome to the show.

Speaker 2:

Thanks so much for having me, Josh. I'm super excited. Well, it's awesome to have you. Can you just spend a minute or two telling our listeners a little bit about your journey into , the printing industry and , your business, KC Swagger as it is today. Sure. It is multifaceted, but I'll try to sum it up in a nutshell. Before I made the plunge, I actually worked for a nonprofit for six years as a communications and graphic designer. Um, I started designing tee shirts on the side and I applied to a craft show, had an amazing response. And I thought, you know what? I looked at my husband, I'm like, let's try this. And thankfully we were in a situation where his job could kind of curious for a little while if it didn't work. So I got on Google and started Googling and first thing that pops up is stalls. Next thing I know, I'm watching all these stalls videos. I'm like, Oh my goodness, I got to get this Hotronix machine. This, this thing looks amazing. I order , you know, of course the best of the best. And I'm not kidding. I started probably at episode one of the STAHLS' show and just consumed myself in it. And so I bought my machine in December and then in January I was up and running and entering into the crazy land of tee shirts. Oh, excellent. And what , what year did you get started? I started in 2015. 2015. Good. So you've made it over the hump on that statistical data that I read, say that most small businesses either succeed or fail in the first 18 months. Actually 80% of small businesses go out of business in the first 18 months. So you're well past that. Congratulations. That's good news to hear. Yeah. And, I was reading a little bit in some of the show notes as we prepared for this, that you've actually had sales growth every year, year on year. Is that accurate? Yes, it has just been a fantastic journey every year when I pull my numbers at the end of the year, I'm just, I'm amazed and I'm so grateful for the opportunity. Good. And you started as a side hustle I guess is they like to call it in this day and age. And did you decide to, at what point did you decide to pull the plug on your career at the nonprofit and make it a full time gig? Okay. So like I said, I first started just making tee shirts on the side and I was using a screen printer and then that's when the control freak in me wanted to take control and start doing it on my own. So after I did a couple of craft shows, and I don't know if you need to know dollar amounts or not, but after I started looking at those numbers and looking at my salary at the job, that's when we realized I was making the same if sometimes not more in my tee shirt business. And so instead of staying up until wee hours in the night cranking on my heat press, we just, went all in. So I started my business in 2015 in April, I side hustled for a complete year. So doing my full time job as director of communications and doing tee shirts. And then I guess it was that May, so a year and a month is when I gave notice at my job, which was so scary because I had been there for six years. But luckily I had a lot of people cheering for me and just didn't look back. Good, good. So , I know that a lot of our listeners and a lot of people in the industry, have a similar journey and some of them are still in the T s hirt business as a side hustle. So I'd like to dive a little bit deeper on the decision making. You mentioned you kind of co mpared t he financials of what you were making in your te e s hirt business versus your salary. Was that more in the scope of like what it could be if you went full time or just at the time you got to a point where it was enough to sustain you? Oh gosh, that's a really, I mean I was honestly, I guess if I'm just being completely honest, I was really lucky to where those were the numbers that I was pulling in. Um, I was really fortunate to find there was an event here in the Kansas city area called chick events. And those little two day events were just insane. Um, I will say that besides just doing events, I also prints for schools and organizations. And the way that I made those connections, there was no shame in my game. Josh, like my , my son was in preschool and I'm sure you know a lot of listeners have kids or grandkids or they know a kid of some sort. So what I did was to start getting the word out about my business cause I didn't really have a budget was it was Gus' Valentine school party. And I said Hey buddy, for Valentine's day there was eight kids in his class. I'm like, you're going to give each kid a custom shirt. So all the little boys got a shirt that had their name on it and all the little girls got a glittery heart cause everybody likes glitter flake with their names in it. And you know, my cost was, you know, probably five or $6 a shirt and with eight kids in the class, my investment was less than $50. And I just thought, I'm just going to put it out there. You know, kids are getting a Valentine's day shirt and you never know who's going to be in that kid's class. And I got so lucky Josh because in there one of the moms reached out and was like, I love this shirt, it's so soft, the print is amazing. And she said that she was getting ready to start a swim team for the neighborhood and turns out that this little swim team that I thought would be a few swimmers was a hundred swimmers. Wow. So right off the bat with no marketing money, I just gave away a couple of free tee shirts. I had landed a client that had a hundred swimmers and then those hundred swimmers had parents and grandparents. And I'm not gonna lie , like kind of kicked my tail. I wasn't ready for the volume that I got, but it was an amazing job. And I landed it just by taking a risk, by sending my kid to school with some shirts. So I don't know, I guess it's, you know, just don't have shame and just start gifting people your product. No, I think that's phenomenal. I would say that's kind of like a, almost a guerrilla marketing tactic, right? Is, finding a way to break through finding something that not everyone else is doing. I can't imagine that a whole lot of, apparel decorators at that point in time are marketing their business through their kids Valentine's day g ift. So I call it creative and something that stuck. So that's awesome. Well, and I will say , when it comes to like my strong areas, I'm definitely stronger in my design, in my creative side when it comes to selling. I am not a salesperson , so I'm not aggressive enough to say, Hey, so and so let me present you some ideas. I would rather just passive aggressively get my foot in the door and show them. And that's kind of also how I got into the school market. So besides just the preschool, you know, obviously my k id's g oing t o go to kindergarten, so he goes to kindergarten and I think, you know, o kay, this first year I'm going to sit back. I'm not g oing t o do anything. I o rdered the shirts through another company and you know, sure enough Halloween rolls around and I think I'm g oing t o make his teacher a t ee shirt. So I make her a Halloween t ee shirt. The other teachers are like, where did you get that shirt? That's so cute. And then I'm doing it all over again, Josh. I'm just getting my little foot in that door and I'm so grateful that the teachers were all excited. So then they approach to the appropriate people and now I've been doing my son's school and then teachers from other schools. It's kind of has just snowballed from there. I would say though, if you're going to give somebody a product , um, make it your best, like make it your original design, do something that not everybody else is doing. Um, I will say there are other printers here in town, but a lot of them don't offer glitter. And that's where Stahls' is like my little awesome secret that I can trump everybody else with this cause I pull out the glitter flake and those little girls go crazy. Yeah, no, I think that , um, that's a key, right, is figuring out where you can differentiate , uh , as well from every other printer and the special effect finishes are definitely a good way to do that. Well, and it's so great with the CAD-CUT® cause you know, if I am just making one t-shirt for a teacher, I can do it in my vinyl and I know that it's going to hold up longer or just as good as screenprint and it looks just as professional. So it's a great way to do one offs and get your foot in the door by gifting those items. Excellent. So I guess if we, let's take a second and fast forward to where your business is today. Um , you made the decision to go full time , uh , you went through that decision making matrix or maybe just trusted your gut and made it happen. Um, but either way, you're here now, you're full time. What do you focus on right now in the business? How are you continuing to grow it as a full time , decoration shop? Well, the sites just doing my schools. I also do custom shirts and that for me is a great extension of my business as well because if I'm creating my own designs and selling them on my website, those are my best margins. So I have found a need for or a niche that works for me really well, u m, besides my school. So let's not talk about that f or a second. The other part, like I was saying, I will do holiday shirts. So you know, 4th of July comes around and I will post a , I m ight be getting ahead of myself, but I have a Facebook group and I'll say, okay, it's time for, you know, Halloween shirts, let me know if you're interested. The order is c losed this day and they have to get their orders. A nd then, and I love my custom shirts c ause like I said, the markup is the greatest. My investment in that shirt might be $6, but I can sell it for a retail price for my customers, whereas I can't do that for my schools, you know. Got it. The gap on price point between those two markets, like a typical retail look, what does that, what do you sell that for? I am selling my custom t-shirts. I usually land about $22. I have found that my jam is kind of moms and women and they love to match their little girls. So if I'm also pairing a k id's design with it, then I usually retail my k ids' shirts for about $14.50 or $15. Okay. And on the school side, what type of margin reduction do you take there On that? I'm doing more of just a double it up. So , usually I try to give my cheapest option for a school that they're selling to their customers is $12,50 for a tee shirt. My sweatshirts are usually in the mid twenties. A long sleeve option's going to be about 16 or $18. Performance tees for little boys in elementary schools are about 15 or $16 and they're extremely popular. But yeah, I can't, you know, I pretty much just double it and try to keep it as low as I possibly can for my schools. Okay. And , you mentioned earlier that you're definitely a design and creative person and sales isn't your strong suit. But how are you, what sales channels are you using outside of your website? How are you reaching these schools and gaining new ones? Sure. Anytime I make a garment, I take a picture of it. If you're not taking pictures of your products for your social media, that's , that's a huge opportunity for you. So any shirt that goes out the door, I'm taking a photo of it. I'm posting it on my Instagram, I'm posting it on my Facebook. Those are my two big ones. I used to do Twitter and I found it just wasn't the right space for me. And time is of the essence. So I kind of scrapped my Twitter and just really focused on Facebook and Instagram. Um , another thing I always do is I request customers to send me their photos. I, you know, I tell them nothing makes me happier than when I see you wearing your KC Swagger. Certain people are more than willing to give you that and that's free content that they're giving you for your page and bonus points. If you post it, then you can usually tag the person too . So then it's showing up on their social media channels as well. So I'm all about that. Free marketing and photos and our business is definitely a visual business. So anytime you can show the products that you're putting out there, some other school will look at that and think, Oh that's so cool. I want to knock out design for my school too. And then they email, Hey, I saw this on Instagram, we're the Pumas , do you think you could do something like that for us? And I'm like, of course. And but you got to also be prepared when you're marketing on social media. I mean a lot of my business, I'm getting requests through messages and DMS. So, I mean, you kind of lose some of that nine to five and you just have to be available to answer questions at any time. But quite honestly, people would rather communicate with me that way. I don't get very many phone calls. A lot of it is emails and social media and maybe that's just the younger generation and how we communicate. I don't know. Sure, sure. No, I think that's important. It's, it's easy, right? You can do it right through your phone and at your convenience. So I think that's a reason a lot of people tend to gravitate towards a T even text or direct message as a communication method. Just as a follow up question , to your marketing efforts, whether on Instagram or Facebook, are you , just kind of building up organically there or did you do any advertising campaigns or to try to generate more for more viewership? I think in the first two years I might've boosted some posts , you know, maybe through like $30 here and there. I'm fortunate right now that I don't have to do that. I will say on Facebook, I don't know how deep you want me to dive into this stuff. I'm kind of a social media dork and I believe in the power of it. I have a Facebook page, which is great, but then I also have a VIP group and this is where I kind of build the hype. And I think what works for my business model is I don't have t-shirts. Like for instance, I'm trying to think, Kansas city stuff is huge right now. So just shirts that say Kansas city in general, but I don't have my designs available to buy all the time. I try to create FOMO, so I want my customers to have that fear of missing out. So I will say, Hey, if you like this shirt, you have until you know, Friday at noon to order it and then it's done. And it might sound crazy, but someone then might message on Saturday and be like, Oh, I missed out. Can I still get that shirt? And then as much as it stinks to turn away a sale, I say, Oh, I'm so sorry the deadline has already passed, but I'll be posting more shirts soon. And once the customer has that feeling of, Oh darn, I really wanted that, the next time they're gonna pull the trigger because they have that fear of it sounds so silly when I'm saying that Josh , they have that fear of missing out on the shirt. And this is for all of my custom stuff, not my schools. So this is for my personal designs. But you have to create that frenzy because if the shirts available all the time, they might think, Oh, that shorts really cute. I might order it later. Does that make sense? No, I , I, I like it. I think that I'm creating some sort of scarcity in the product helps too . You have to figure out some compelling way to get people to act and purchase. And so some people do that through sales and promo codes. Another way to do it is through a limited edition or limited time. And so I've seen it work in a number of different ways. The way you're deploying it is certainly an effective one. But you're right, the tough decision is being able to say no, right? No. When somebody comes back c ause that maintains integrity and drives the future sales. But that is tough, Right? Well and sometimes I'll cave if enough people requests it, then I'll say, okay we're going to do a reorder. Like I'll at least wait two weeks though and ask the maker. It makes my life easier too because after I closed the order I take a look and I say, okay, what's the most cost effective way to make these items? Is it going to be my, my Stahls' CAD-CUT® or do I need to turn to Transfer Express to make sure that I'm using my time in the most efficient way possible? And so having those orders all at once is a great way for me to get the best, you know, the best margins because I have a real time look and I know, all right , I'm, you know, up to 60 orders. This is going to be a Transfer Express order and I can get them for X amount of dollars or maybe it didn't go so well and I met like 15. Okay. I'm going to cut and weed these myself. Yeah, that's perfect. Perfect. So I think so far we've, we've talked about marketing your business with little to zero budget. You've shared some effective ways to do that and you've certainly talked about creating demand and excitement for your product in a crowded marketplace and also , knowing your niche and more specifically , knowing your customer, you had a very clear picture about who your customer is , and then owning it. So , talked a lot about sales, some of your successes. I'd like to shift a little bit of our conversation to some of the things you're struggling with now on the business or , that you'd like to just pick my brain on. Is there any, what are the top challenges for you in the business right now? Oh gosh. Well, you know, like I said, I'm more of a creative mindset. So for me it's processes and just knowing how to grow and how to best grow. Because I am a one woman shop. I will admit it. I'm kind of a control freak too. So it's like if I make the plunge to hire someone, what do these should I let go of and how, you know, how best to delegate those. And I don't know. You know, and I'm trying to think ways to expand. You know, I don't, I currently don't embroider. I would love to know more about that. You know, I see all these things that you can do with stalls products and an embroidery machine , um, or I'm just rambling them off. Organization is a big one for me too . As you can tell. I'm super chatty and create a mindset. So my office is not that organized. I love when people are on the stalls group and they're posting their workspace and I can see how they're doing incoming and outcoming orders because sometimes my office looks like a bomb went off. Josh Looks like my desk sometimes. Right? It just means we're working hard. I like to tell myself that. All right. Good. So yeah, those are certainly some big things to dive into. I think that , making the decision on when is the right time to hire in the business is probably after deciding from going to side hustle to a full time business. That's probably one of the most common challenges that an apparel decorator faces because we see a lot of shops that are , um, even at full time businesses still working the late hours trying to pull together family members as we talked a little bit before the show. Yes, exactly. To get the work done. So one of my first questions that I ask when somebody is in that space is , number one is identifying what tasks that you have that need in the business during a day. So it sounds like you have a pretty good understanding, not only of the tasks that are being done, but also , which ones you're good at. W ould you say that's correct? Yes. O kay. If you were to, if you had the perfect person that could do it as well as you, o r even better, which t asks would you delegate first? I would give them the stuff I don't like doing. Yeah . Which is what, Oh, folding and packing orders, sending invoices , responding to inquiries. I , I'm pretty selfish. I like to print. I like to design, you know, I like that creative part of it. It's the business part that gets yucky. Good. No, that's , that's good. So I think that, you know, when you , one of the big things is let's just say, let's go down the road for a second, that you were to hire somebody to handle some of the , folding and packing and those sorts of tasks is , I believe that's what you mentioned. You have some family members helping with today. Yes. We have a spirit spirit store. We're trying to get out the door today. Okay. So do you have a pretty good process of what it takes to complete that task? Like instructions that are pretty well defined? They're all in my head. I should probably type them up, but yeah, I , I , there's definitely a system a way that we do it. Yeah. So usually I like to tell people that that's square one is taking the time and it's challenging to document a step by step guide that happens for each job that you conducted your business, whether that is invoicing, folding, packing, working with the heat press. And you can prioritize that based on what you imagine , hiring for first. And then I think another important thing is once you do that , hiring is, is one decision, but there's also an intermediate step or sometimes a longterm step, that can be outsourcing. And so it probably doesn't work too well with folding and packing, but, y ou know, there are a lot of other tasks in the business like responding to inquiries or g enerating sales that really can be conducted with an employee that's not on your books. So I think that's an effective way as well. If y ou ever considered that, you mean like a commission based salesperson ? Yeah. Or somebody that's just driven based on the , actually generating revenue from the inquiries that come in. So yeah, I mean how many, I guess it doesn't really matter how many, but I assume you're getting a fair amount of inquiries a week of people that are interested in a shirt or a product. Yes. And you know, something that I struggle with is taking the time to create those templates. So I need to carve out time, which is so hard, but to be like, cause every time I get a request I'm having to price things out and make the bid. Like it would just be so helpful if there was an easier way to calculate the costs for customers because I'm spending a lot of time trying to, you know, I go under guys's website and try to figure out the , how much of the material is going to cost and then what's the price of the garment and you know, just even being able to respond to the customer, how much each shirt it's going to cost. It takes quite a bit of time. Yeah. It's , so it's certainly one of our top questions that we get here. It's typically, you have someone that wants to know how do I create it from an art standpoint, which you have down. Um, but we get a lot equal questions on how do I know what it costs and how much should I sell it for? So I think those are two of the major challenges in the business. So if you can , uh, even if it's the law of averages, if you take your last 10 orders and figure out, you know, some big buckets or categories of what stuffs , has costed to make and what it sold for, if you can template that pricing or put into a grid, I think it will make your life a lot easier. I know, I know. I just need to carve out a day and be like, Gina's not do anything but this cause in the long run it would save so much more time. Yeah. So I think, I mean, I think there may be some time that you can carve out of your day just through taking those simple steps. Have you, I mean, are you at the stage where you're really serious about hiring somebody or you're , it's just, you see it on the horizon. I know my husband wants me to because I still am just working crazy hours. I know I need to, I'm nervous too because I think to myself, what if they don't like the job? What if there's not enough for them to do? And even though I think there would be, I just, I second guess myself a lot. Good. No, I think that , I think it is a challenging phase. It's something that can go way wrong. The rule is always to hire slow. Especially when you're a small business and it's employee number one, right? Or number two I guess , um , is making sure you get the right person. So I would , I personally would recommend seeing what you can carve out of your day through outsourcing. How much of your day are you spending on , cutting and weeding? I , I'm to the point now with my schools, I'm usually just cutting and weeding. If I'm giving them their samples for the sale , or if I happen to do a glitter design. Otherwise I'm a lot of the times using Transfer Express for a lot of my stuff. So not as much as when I started out because when I started out my orders were much smaller, so I was definitely using CAD-Cut® much more frequently than I am now. Good. And just as a shameless plug are you aware that Stahls' can cut and weed the glitter for you and send you the prints ready to press? I am aware of that. Okay. So that can, that can be an effective way to outsource this . Sometimes it seems like you're doing it with a transfer express, which is great. You know, I'm kind of cheap though. And so that's what I call him , like my best friend. I'm like, Hey, you want to watch a movie and pick some glitter?

Speaker 4:

Oh, that works too. Yeah.

Speaker 2:

Then that I'm extremely interested in , um, you guys did a video not too long ago with the, is it the distress Chino twill, yeah. Yeah, yeah. I would love to see that. And some different colors so that I could pitch it to my schools. Yeah, that, that works well. Uh , the only thing with that one are you're talking about the heat applied only version of the letters. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. That one. Okay, perfect. Well thank you for the feedback. I think , uh ,

Speaker 4:

well it's good. Well, you know, feedback you didn't ask for feedback. We want though.

Speaker 2:

I will tell you the , one of the big challenges, and you mentioned it early on, is a lot of folks , equipment is expensive and while you could invest in embroidery equipment, the ROI on a piece of equipment like that is typically, it can be very long for the jobs you can put through it over the course of a day. So people generally decorators are looking for more solutions that can look like they're sewn but only be heat applied. So that's definitely a strategic direction for us to try to keep your life simple. Yeah. And I need to educate myself more on that and see what else you guys have put out there about it. Um, I'm sure there's probably more videos that I haven't seen yet, but I'm definitely interested in that. Cause again, that's one more thing that can set me apart is offering a school something that looks different than besides just a screen printed shirt. Sure, sure. No, that makes sense. Um, so you mentioned, I think you mentioned your business is out of your home, correct? Yes. That's enough . That's another issue that, you know, when I stop and think about the future of my business, I go back and forth on what's going to be the best solution. I mean, what's great about being in my house is after my children go to bed, I can come back downstairs and start working again. But if it's not in my home anymore, that's a different story. So that's something that we roll around with a lot too. Thankfully, I've never had anybody question the professionalism of my business when they learn inside of my home. But I always wonder what the perception is when they hear that. But then of course, I always let them know that I have industrial commercial grade equipment through Stahls'. So,

Speaker 4:

yeah, I think,

Speaker 2:

Oh, I was just going to say, it's not like I bought my heat press off of Amazon and you know, like my stuff is legit and your stuff is not going to fall apart. Yeah. I think getting customers to believe that , um, can be a challenge for people. I bet you it comes with a good word of mouth advertising and customers that have experienced success or even customers that are engaging on your Facebook page kind of vouching or giving you credibility that these are quality. Um, but for businesses early on, a lot of times that's the top challenge rate is the perception that this is just a hobby business, right? And I'm not going to get a professional grade product. So if you've been able to overcome that perception with kind of highlighting the equipment and proving that out, that's a big step. Yeah. Anytime you can say that you've got commercial grade or I love like people will be like, you know, once you started t-shirt business, then all these people come out of the woodwork and say, Oh, I'm thinking about doing that too . How much was your press? And I tell them and a lot of them were like, Oh, okay. And so, you know, I think even what does it hurt to tell someone how much your press costs? In my case, I feel like it almost helps me cause they know that I made the investment and I'm using the best of the best for them. You know, and it gives me peace of mind because I don't have to worry about somebody returning something and telling me that it fell apart. So I, you know, if someone out there, I guess listening has an Amazon press

Speaker 5:

[inaudible]

Speaker 2:

I , how do I say this nicely? Like it's fine. But I will say the Stahls' investment is 1000 times worth it to get yourself a good, good heat press, I mean little things like being able to thread the garment there, it's all just going to help your business. So even if that price tag is scary, it will pay for yourself or you know, pay for itself when you're giving your customer a product that is not going to fall apart or appeal . Yeah. The , math that I always like to do is , take the price of the machine and divide it by the warranty year . So for round numbers, let's say a $1,500 machine , um, divided by the five year warranty is about $300 a year. Cost to own. Um, you know what the profit you're making on shirts, whether that's five bucks a shirt, 10 bucks a shirt, it's possible you pay that press off and uh , you know, one school order. Exactly. And you know, I had a small little issue with my press , I called tech support. If you're getting your machine off Amazon, who are you going to call? Who is going to help you? You know, this nice man talk to me and talk to me through what I needed to do to get my machine fix . So it's just, it's so worth it. Good. Well we, we appreciate the plug. I can promise our listeners, I promise that's get ready to say the same thing, but uh , it's good. No, we uh, have a lot of successful customers, a lot of customers on the heat press for profit Facebook group. So if you're interested as a listener and joining other like-minded apparel decorators to share photos of your work, see photos of other folks, work, ask questions. Uh, this podcast is an extension of our heat press for profit Facebook group where there's conversation going on everyday . Lots of good stuff there. So , uh, as you, just to kind of move towards conclusion of our time together , uh , today , uh, share kind of how you measure success , uh , in the business, what do you look at? Uh , when you think of defining whether or not the business is successful from a day to day or from a bigger scheme, a year to year ? I have a monthly goal that I have for myself that I measure for. I mean, if you want to look at it financially, I know I set amount that I want to make. Um, I also have a very detailed, like once a month I want to put out a custom shirt and you know, so I have my benchmarks there. But for me, see this is so not the professional part of me, Josh, cause I'm a creative mindset. Success for me is when I see someone wearing their shirt out in public to me that says, I love your product and I'm wearing it. You know, like if I'm at the park playing with my kids and a Casey swagger shirt walks by, like that's the best part for me because that person chose to wear something that I made. And I know that's not professional at all. Obviously I have finance financial goals, like I said, but that's the best part of the job for me is seeing someone love it and wear it. And I always try not to be a dork when I see something out in public. You don't, you don't give them a shout them out. Say I made that shirt. No, I tried to play it . Cool. I'll just sneak a photo or anything. No, but I definitely like will tell my husband, like, that's one of mine , babe . Yeah. And, and uh, so we always joke here when we hire a new sales person , the, the industry that we're in kinda changes us. You can't go too out in a public place to a dance competition, to a sporting event. Even into a retail store without , uh, approaching every tee shirt, all the products differently. It's, you know, well , yeah, I mean , you got to touch it. Like how did they make that turn it inside out? The little nuances of the apparel decorating world. But you can always spot somebody that's in the space. When you see someone doing that. Are you looking at some font that they use and it's not current correctly and you're like, Oh, that looks so bad. All right, excellent. No, I think that's good. I mean, it's aspirational and I think that's real really where the rubber meets the road and kind of connects it from a feeling perspective of, look, people are liking my work. I'm gaining market share. I'm seeing my product out there. And I think there is a creative side to the business. I mean, I'm very analytical and about the numbers, but I can appreciate , um, you know, defining success in more ways than just a financial statement. And I do think that's important because you know, most folks will launch a business or start a business because they're on a greater mission to make an impact. It's not always about dollars and cents. So that's good to hear. And I feel like your customers can tell if you love what you do. Yeah, certainly. Certainly. Good. So do you have any more questions , uh , that you have for me , uh , that you'd like to get help on, on the air that someone else may benefit from? Um, no, just please don't ever stop making those videos cause we watch them, you know, I watch them while I'm working. Since I'm a one woman shop, if I'm pressing a big order, I have you guys on in the background and they are so beneficial. If somebody listening is not watching those videos, you need to, I learn things every single episode. I see new things. So just continue to put out content for us because I am always learning, always growing. Like you mentioned the stalls he pressed for profit group. I'm so fortunate for that forum. I can go on and ask any question and within a matter of minutes, people that do what I do are willing to answer and help me out. So it's just, it's a great community. I'm so glad that I found you guys back in 2015 because I knew nothing about the business and just by putting in the time and going through the resources that you put out, it has just helped me more than I could ever say. And I'm sure I have questions, but right now I'm nervous so I can't even think of any. But when I think of them I just hop onto the Facebook group and there you guys are. That's awesome. Well I want to thank you so much and I want to congratulate you on the business growth. Thank you for the business you've done for stalls and for being our first shop podcast guest. Oh gosh. I hope I didn't scare people away. Nah , nah , he did. Phenomenal. So thanks so much and best of luck with your business. Moving forward for the rest of this year and beyond. Thank you Josh.

Speaker 1:

All right , so we want to thank Gina for joining us. There was so much good information. If you'd like to ask followup questions, just look for our show conversation. Thread over at the heat press for profit Facebook group where you can network and share ideas with thousands of businesses, including KC Swagger so we can help each other to turn a profit with heat printing.

Speaker 6:

[inaudible] .