B2B Community Builder Show (formerly Chief Executive Connector)

132 | Running a Home Remodeling Shop Like a Silicon Valley Startup w/ Brett Ruiz

August 09, 2021 Pablo Gonzalez / Brett Ruiz Season 3 Episode 132
B2B Community Builder Show (formerly Chief Executive Connector)
132 | Running a Home Remodeling Shop Like a Silicon Valley Startup w/ Brett Ruiz
Show Notes Transcript

Brett Ruiz and I connected on LinkedIn a few months ago, and his outlook on leadership and relationship building made us close friends immediately.

Brett sees the business of home remodeling from a refreshingly innovative perspective.  The best way I can describe it is, he approaches his business the way a Silicon Valley startup founder approaches their business.  That's uncommonly brilliant in his industry.

That's why he is the visionary of Medina Exteriors dba Simply Distinct Kitchens & Baths, and a dedicated Strategic Coach Student.

In this episode we'll talk about:
- The 8 Category levers: how an article from Category Pirates applies to his business
- His plan for software development in his industry
- His involvement in the Strategic Coach community, the number 1 entrepreneurship for small and medium-sized businesses (according to the past guest, Justin Breen)
- His "New" way to go to clients: putting them first and not talking about his products, rather talking about the value and what it solves

Connect with Brett!

On LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/brett-ruiz-1a7530b/


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Brett:

I remember the first time that. I, I think you had did something and oh yeah. You remember? What, what was those things that, and I still have to do on the last call. Last call, bro. Are you doing one I'm sitting there. Yeah. All right, let's do this. Dude's got it. Go on. I like this man. So I like, you know what? I'm on video, Texas dude. So I like video texts. You and I got the mute. Your you're in the background. What's up Pablo, how you doing,

Pablo:

man? I forgot about that though. And

Brett:

we were doing that and I think I sent you one in the morning and you sent one back. Your hair is all over the place and you know, you're like, Hey, what's up, man? I just woke up or whatever it was awesome.

Pablo:

Welcome to the B2B community builder podcast. This is my first time reading out that kind of intro. I'm your host and chief executive connector. Pablo Gonzalez. Today, I got up a man who I think may be my favorite person I've ever met on LinkedIn. And he said, he's holding that belt right now, came into my life friend of a friend because he's part of a specific community. And, you know, because I interviewed somebody that was in the community. I think I got on, I think I got on his radar and as we have built this relationship, I've greatly grown to admire the way that he thinks about business, the way that he thinks about relationships and the way that he shows up in my life as a value. He's the visionary at Medina exterior's DBA, simply distinct kitchens and baths and a strategic coach student, and a mere motto from Cleveland, Brett Ruiz. Welcome

Brett:

Brett. Awesome. Thanks Pablo. I'm just humbled and just so grateful to have this opportunity to be on the podcast and to share some insight and add some value to your community. So I

Pablo:

love it, man. You've been adding a lot of value to my life since the moment I met you, dude. So let's, let's talk about how we met, right? So, so you are, how did I, how did I come into, how did I come into your like

Brett:

presence into my spear? Huh? That's pretty big. But, when someone does blip on it, it was through, I believe you interviewed her at talk to Justin Brown. And he's in strategic coach and I know Justin, fairly well LinkedIn connection, you know how those are, you know, you feel like, you know, somebody really well. So that's how we met. And I started listening to your podcast and, talked to Justin A. Little bit about you. And he said, Hey, the dude's the real deal, man. So that's, that's how we got connected. Yeah. That's, it's been a story ever since,

Pablo:

dude, you know, I was literally just reflecting on the impact that Justin's made on my life. Because yesterday I was telling an old friend of mine that like, I felt like, like I, I was telling an old friend of mine. I'm like, you know what, man, I'm just done doing business with anybody that isn't just a fast action taking entrepreneurial visionary. Like I just, I got no interest in anybody else now that I've found it. And I like, I all of a sudden removed myself from, from like listening to what I'm saying. And I'm like, this is exactly what it must feel like to talk to Justin Brene. Like I, like, I think I just finally bought into everything he does.

Brett:

It's finding your, your true unique. And I I'll tell you, Justin is one that he just, he lives it to the 10th. I mean, it's incredible. And I'm trying to get there. It's sometimes he's a little intimidating to me.

Pablo:

Yeah. Like it's funny. Cause when I started my interview with them, I'm like, do I just like, I like the swagger, you guys like some higher, I don't know if they got started. I'm like you got swagger, but, but this isn't about me. This isn't about Justin. That's right. That's right. I got his episode. but you guys, you know, I, the way that I understand that the link there is the strategic coach community and Justin is Justin be adjusting. He's like, so did your coaches the best community in the world? It's, there's nothing else. Right. But I believe that man, cause everybody that I've met that comes from that circle is exactly what I just described. Forward-thinking, visionary action, taking entrepreneur leader of people. Tell me a little bit about the strategic coach community, how you got involved and kind of like what, what your involvement is with it and like the benefits. from it

Brett:

Yeah. Great question. And I with, with that, it's a Dan Sullivan is who is the owner of strategic coach. And the tools that he's developed in the community that he developed is just incredible. In regards to we were on a, a meeting yesterday, I was asked to be a panelist on their tasters, where they bring a bunch of people in there. That are Right for taking and becoming part of strategic coach and we were talking and it's amazing. We were just looked. I said, you know, we're unicorns because we're so different as entrepreneurs. And I've never found a community that of other unicorns, if that makes sense or any lands or whatever you want to call them. So when I started, investigating strategic coach through LinkedIn, I saw it on LinkedIn and some other areas, some people have talked about it. That's where it really hit me was when I got in there, there were people that were like me that understood what you just said. You know, th th the value creation being of abundance, not being of scarcity, also, finding your unique ability so that you can be part of a unique community, that you can start putting your puzzle together, and you'd be able to bond with other people that, will be able to fill your puzzle out. Because Dan wrote a great book called who not how, and that really hit me too. I'm like, I've been trying to do all the how's I've been trying to build this business, trying to do all these things. And you and I have talked about this, the content categories and making content and getting it out everywhere. And I love it. I wanted to do that. I was telling you before we came on 15 years ago, I was doing that, trying to, I just can't do it. I'm not the how so that's where really strategic coach has really empowered me to be around. And I'm still learning that because, I'm a good student and I want to really dig into that and trust that, and then have that trust in other people too. And I'm, I'm finding that in strategic coach that they're, they're genuine, like you saw with Justin and, there's, you know, just a bunch of them. They're just true people that will do anything to help you in a business sense. And they're all about family and they're well-rounded, which I really liked too, because it's not always about just just law or, you know, business. I've done that.

Pablo:

Yeah. So help me understand, man. What, what works so well in the strategic coach? Right? Like I, I, when I'm. Since Justin bringing strategic coach into my, you know, awareness, I've heard a lot, people talk about Dan Sullivan and his methodologies and all this stuff. So the way that I, understand it, he's got a bunch of great content, right? Like he's got some very actionable stuff and philosophies and frameworks to work with. And that's one piece. And I know that that exists. What is the difference between Dan Sullivan's content and the actual community that he's created around it? Like what, what drives that sense of community? If there is one or is it just like, the content is so good that everybody buys into it? So now everybody has the same values. So it goes, can you kind of talk me through some. of that

Brett:

Yeah, that's a, that's a great scenario. I would say that Dan Sullivan and I don't want to speak for him. I I've been in coach for less than a year. I've met him once, but I would say that from what I've seen from my 30,000 foot view, and I have not had an actual live event, which we're having in November, which I can't wait too I know that is my, where I love the rubber meets the road. You meet people, talk to them afterwards, grab a drink. So, from what I've seen is that Dan has this unique ability to create content and then be able to present it to a community that values it. So he's adding value to people's lives. And at least for me, when I see somebody adding value and content and creating it, and that's actually works and it's been proven, and then you have a other people in the same community with different unique abilities, all using those tools, it allows you to perform. At your top or your highest level. So I think that's what Dan brings. He's very good at what he does in creating the content. And he's 76 years old and you would think he was 30. He has that same ambition, same drive even more so now when I hear him on tapes or hear him in person. so that's where I think that he brings that community, that that's what people are drawn to. And then they're able to take that and run with it and then be successful with it. Because as entrepreneurs, we all suffer from he, I don't know how he does it. He's just got that mind to do it, to know that what we suffer from, and then he has a solution for it, and then he implements it and then we use it.

Pablo:

So I don't know if I'm thinking about it the right way. Right. But when I think of what you're saying, that to me drives a relationship with Dan. What drives the relationship with the other people in the group? Right? Like anytime I see something from Justin, something from you, something from what's his name that just released the, financial platform bill bloom from bill bloom. Who's awesome. Right? Yeah. He introduced me to John LaDuca. Who's awesome. Right? Like I see you guys all interacting with each other. What drives the actual interaction within that community?

Brett:

So I don't believe so. Dan, has a philosophy that it's not about him. He's creating the content so that if Dan's gone. The content still lives or the process is still live. So we're interacting with each other. I haven't, I mean, I didn't never met Dan until I was in one of the mighty sessions and I actually had a breakout with him and he talked with me and that was after I joined. So to, to create that, uh, I had a great, awesome thought. I lost it, but, yeah, that, but that, that would be probably how we can, and that's where we're seeing the value is that you have people that have bought into that system or whatever Dan does. But when I talked to a bill bloom, when I talked to Justin, when I talked to all of these people, is that there's that, how can I put it? There's that sense of community, almost like family, you know, that they're, they're there for you and it's, and I, I trust them. Yeah, because they wouldn't do anything to damage that community or damage that quote unquote family. Yeah, because that does, that makes sense. They wouldn't

Pablo:

be in it. That makes sense. And listen, you said a couple of things that, to me strikes out as things that unify people, one is that if somebody is, is defining problems, the way that you're like, oh, this is the problem that I have and offering a solution that, you know, that's part of category design too, right? Like the, the ability to evangelize a problem and then be known for the solution because you described it so well, tends to unify people and the joining around core values. Right? Like understanding that, okay, if you're into this, then we have the same values. That's going to bring us together. So I could see that doing the work. Right. Like I could see that then if somebody else buys into this, then you automatically walk in with your guard down. Cause you're like, well, you definitely think like this to a certain extent. So I'm, I'm more in than out. Is there any. In the onboarding or in the sales process. Is there any like indoctrination around the idea of like, I'm going to introduce you to this person, or you should be reaching out to this many people? Like, is, is that any part of the formal process in any way?

Brett:

Yeah, so that was like yesterday they call them tasters. So what they do is obviously people inquire about the program and then there's different levels. You have to be to, to qualify, to be invited to the taster program. So once you get to that taster, so really what they're showing you there is they're showing you their tools there. It's not about yes, the community's there. And then I think yesterday there was 95 people in that taster and they all got a sense of yeah. Where they have moderators coaches, you know, it's not just Dan there's 100 and something coaches, but it allowed you to see, and it was amazing seeing everybody's face because they're all like this, this light bulb. Oh, he's a unicorn too. Oh, he's a unicorn. All the panel and everybody. And then you see all these people start interacting with each other that are making 200,000 plus and one group 500,000 plus a million plus, you know, they're having the same issues that all of us are having. I think, as an entrepreneur, we're on that island, at least for me doing this 30 years, I felt I was on an island and I didn't have that unique community that I could go to. That would allow me, like you said, be vulnerable, get my guard down. That's what coaches, bought and as soon as I saw it and it's not inexpensive to be in it, but as soon as I saw it, and then I explained it to my wife and showed her some of the things she's like, yeah, that's way too much as a CFO but in reality. She's like, that's exactly what I needed because I am a creative person, a visionary, and you can only pen me in for so much. You got to let this wild horse run out in the field, but I do need some parameters. And that helps a little bit. So that's what strategic coach has brought to me personally, as a value they've created that value and then they've created a community that supports that value.

Pablo:

Got it, got it. All right. That makes a lot of sense, man. Cool. I really wanted to, I'm glad you shared that with me, man. Cause I've been fascinated with like digging into the dynamics of strategic coach. Cause I, I see myself as I expect to be a part of it within a year or two, right? Like I, I think I need to. It, my business stays on the track that it, that, that it just got on a month ago as I'm onboarding all these clients, my cashflow is definitely gonna be there. Right. So like, I'm, I'm totally looking forward to joining. So it's not an, if

Brett:

it's a win Pablo Gonzales.

Pablo:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. I agree, man, dude, I agree. Like I've, I've I definitely feel in the last month or two, I have taken this like level up that there is no coming down from, right. Like I, I, whatever, whatever doubt I had and what I was doing has completely vanished. And now I'm just like operating at this level that I've shed all this extra weight that I was carrying of one part imposter syndrome, one part. Child. Right. Right. Like I think, I think I've been through a ride. Right.

Brett:

I seen a man. I mean, I know it's not about you, but I I've seen it. It's good to see, you know, as, as our friendship and as a business and personal grows, I I've seen that transformation. And like you said, it's only been a couple, so that's exciting. You came into my

Pablo:

life right. As I was hitting that curve, man, which is really cool. Yeah. That's

Brett:

awesome.

Pablo:

All right, man, let's talk about, let's narrow it out, right? Like I love, like I said to me, it's very clear to me that you have a, what is traditionally a mom and pop business that is operated by people that don't think very differently. It's just kind of like a, a price game and a hustle game, which. The, the business of remodeling residential homes. Right. And, and, and you went from having like an exterior company to a kitchen and bath remodeler to vertically integrating the design build element of it. Right? Most people, you have to get a, a designer and then you get a contractor, right. You're both all in one house. You've created this like showroom experience. You're working on an app now, right? Like all of these different things that make me think that you're a cat that thinks out of another level. So as we've become better and better friends, and I'm like, all right, man, I sent you a little bit of this. And a little bit of, this is what I believe in one of these things that we've bonded over has been Christopher Lochhead and Chris and Chris Walker's content. Right. And, and, and, and the, the category pirates newsletter, right. I sent you this article that is called w let me see what the, what the name of eight category levers, how to build a massive Pacific ocean size differentiation moat. That is about how category design can be applied across eight different levels of business. Can you tell me right now, just abstractly, when you, when you got that article and you started reading it, what, what kind of like. If I just tell you, give me your overall impression of that thing. Give me let's start there and then let's dig in.

Brett:

All right. So the, the category pirates as I was reading, I'm going I was like, Tim, the tool, man. I was like, whoa, I'm like number six, number seven. I'm like this stuff all makes sense. You know, it's like they were reading my mind as I went through it. And the interesting thing is, is not only as I read it, I, I, my wife's our CFO. So I had her read it and she was, as good as I do, but it was cool that she saw the same thing, you know, and started digging and asking the questions, you know, finding out, you know, how the stories should be radically having a different brand, you know, going through different pricing. You know, I've always thought that I'm thinking abundance, not scarcity. I want to be, I want to get those people. That will and you know, what tied it all together for me was what we've talked. It's like always these puzzles being put together for me, this was a part of it. You had sent it to me and then what you do fit right in it. How do we take and make these people that we've have as our, as our, what, what's the word I'm looking for? Consumers superstars, super consumers. We want them to go out and, and why they should be the ones telling my story. And then of course I tell the story. So it's been really cool to see it in writing. And then, being able to find a who that can implement that. For me. And then, you know, just, it was great. I mean, the, the best way to think about pricing is very simple equation. I mean, it wasn't rocket science, it really wasn't rocket science, but it made so much sense. So that was kind of my 30,000 foot view. I mean, I got, I mean, I have the article, I got notes, I got all kinds of stuff everywhere. It's just, it was good, really good. about tech, about value, stress free, you know, and I'm making notes of how I can implement that into, into my business. And that's the one thing that I've found as, I took the Kobe on the 2, 5, 9, four, which allows me to be a quick start. I'm not a big fat fine. And you've kind of seen that with me. I can start real quick. I don't get the facts, but different things that go on, but then I was able to, you know, I can implement things tangibly and then I can also, make things happen. Change doesn't bother me. I just, okay, let's go do it. Let's figure it out and let's make this happen. So that's where you see my business evolve and I think a little bit different than your standard construct or even business person, I think in general. And that's what I found at strategic coach. I found other people like that. I was like, I just thought everybody was like that. They're not correct until you see it. So not everybody's an entrepreneur. So, or can or can be, I should say

Pablo:

agreed, agreed a hundred percent. So talk, talk me through some of the notes you made in that, in that article, man, let let's, let's, let's dive into what, like talk me through one of the things that stood out the most and the notes that, that, that you got going on and let's, let's, let's talk about it.

Brett:

Yeah. They had on lever. One was radically different benefit for radically different problem in, you know, some of the things I'm asking, you know, what am I, you know, what are my client's fears, ask them the time disruption, you know, what are those things that, that they see that we could be a solution to radically different and that we can radically approach that and be able to change that. and how do you look at that different it's you change the who, what, when, why and how about the problem? so I really liked that radically different brand. The first thing in the brand that stands out, I thought that was cool. A different way of helping to the end consumer and the user, just a different mindset and how you're going to market. Yeah. And then I'm thinking too, outside the box to where they're thinking, you know, doing radically different prices, super consumer, that's all stuff. That's, you know, it's really here today in AI and all the things that we can do that the whole industry has changed and what I do and how you present, soup. I I'm 55 years old. So I'm, I'm really good at the, Hey Pablo, tell me a little more about that. All the benefits that we have and everything you've seen today here, Pablo, and this and this and this. Why wouldn't you decide to say yes. today Yeah. And you know that it doesn't work anymore. They want what the pie, the pirate categories laid out here. And that's what we've been doing. But to see someone put it on paper and then it, and give me some, some encouragement and then some drive to say, yes, that is the right direction to go. And then I meet you and see the content that I see you everywhere. So that was really cool. so let's, let's, let's,

Pablo:

let's dive in a little bit then, right? So the first three were radically different benefit, radically different brand and radically different experience, right? Like when I, when I think of, when I think of your business in particular, Most contractors are selling price, right? Like, oh, well, yeah, we can get this done for you cheap. Right then the next Then the next level of contractor sells time. I can definitely get this done for you. And it's going to be done. The next level of contractor sells quality. I'm going to get a done for you. I'm going to get done for you the first time. And you're going to love it. I feel like you sell at another higher level than that you're selling, you're selling more of like you're relationship, right? Like, and, and you are, you're kind of selling, this is my family business and you're, you're part of this thing. Right? Like, talk me, talk me through how you think the what's the benefit that you give that's radically different.

Brett:

So what I see is I don't think it's just in my business. I mean, in my trade, I think it, but in my business, you're exactly right. So I've always, since I was a kid, I've always like, thought different. I'm like, how can you do everybody else is saying this? Yeah, I want to be different. And I, how can I present that in a different way? And not be like everybody else. That was how I always try to differentiate myself. I used to do things like buying, buy, you know, Propole all these things you do put all my side, dude. I, at one time I had a 24 by 24 sign and had my company logo on it and boom, put it in the yard. I could not read it from three houses away in a neighborhood. I said, get rid of all a hundred of them. I need it 30 by 40, you know, that kind of stuff to be able to tell people and keep it plain and simple. So that was the biggest thing is that you're exactly right. As we're building a relationship with people, the relationship flywheel, we're building those relationships with people and treating them as people and not as a commodity. And then I'm not going after them on price. I'm not going to compete. I don't want to compete. at a Commodity cause I'll never win. It's always going to be exactly what you said. I mean, you have to be lower. I'm always have to be fighting that battle. I'm going to have to find different ways to buy better. I mean, those things we do, but I want that relationship. I want that partnership with people and I want to bond with them emotionally and also be able to supply them exactly what they need. And then that's where I love the content categories to creation the value creation. I want them to be baked 95% or 80% before they even come to me because if I can do that, when we show them what we do, it's a no brainer. But that's exactly what we do. I very rarely close and, you know, do those old school closes? I mean, we're, it's been incredible just doing that in that journey. And I, I get excited as that to see, you know, when I'm talking to somebody about it, it's like, man, we're, we're selling honey. We just sold five, $100,000 jobs, you know? And it's because of the things you're talking about. And sometimes I forget. That that is different. And then doing this content being connected to this, going to that conference in September, you know, that charges me up. Yeah.

Pablo:

I love it, dude. I love it. Totally agree. Totally, totally, totally agree. I'm glad that you phrased it that way. I then I would love to jump then to radically different experience is Definitely something you've been working on for a while, right? Because to go to go design build as a rat is a radically different experience in, in all construction, right? Like my, wife works for a $800 million design build contractor and it, I'm still shocked by the fact that not all construction has done design build because it's clearly a greater delivery mechanism. It's a much better experience to have one person. And I'm fascinated by the mindset of vertical integration, right? Like Jayden Gregg and JWB they're vertically integrated, like to me, I see, I see so much value in that vertical integration piece. At what point, at what point did you. Go from, you know, supplying one versus the other than, than doing both things. Like what, what, how, how did you start with all that?

Brett:

So we have on the extra side, we've always been, I guess you'd call it design build, you know, when you do roofing siding windows, but we were the same model as everybody else. When I got into the space of the kitchen and bath industry coming from the exterior side and coming from the model that I do this to make money, you know, to, to do well. I mean, not, that's not my driving force, but if I'm going to do something, I'm going to do it. So my gross price. So I that's a client. I want, you know, I, I want that slim piece of the pie. I don't want the person that's, you know, we're going to I'm going to be the cheapest because then I get all their friends. So I want to make sure that I'm getting the right clients so that I continue to get their friends and all their clients. So that started it. And then I looked at the kitchen and bath industry. And it really is. How can I put this? Because people hear this. It is, it's a wreck where they have this old school way of doing things that, you know, you need a designer, I'm going to show you what you want, not ask them, but I'm going to show you Pablo, what you and your wife want. Here's what I can do on this. Here's this great design and not listened to. That's what I was seeing out there. I was like, w that's not right. And how I experienced that was remodeling my kitchen. And that's what they were doing to me. And I'm like, yeah, you can't do that. And to my wife, especially. So that's where I started that, that, that process that I'm like, yeah, this isn't right. This can be done better. So that's where that came from. So then it became vertically. I'm like, well, you're right. You have to control is probably not the right word. You have to be able to have all the pieces to the puzzle so that all the pieces of the puzzle, talk to each other, communicate to each other, and then you have to charge enough So that when Pablo and your, you and your wife, Hey, you know, we had this little hiccup here and here, I'm not nickel and dime you every time we turn around and you got to investigate in front, I think that's anything in business. If you investigate in front, do what you need to do upfront, do the legwork, put the process in place, do the project finish it. You're able to do that, but you have to charge for that. Yeah.

Pablo:

Yeah. And that's where, that's where a radically different experience bleeds into radically different price. And I want to, I want to hit on something you said, it's not that you need to control the process. It's that you need to be accountable for the whole process. There you go. Right. Like if you, if you you're carrying the sense of accountability for all of it, it makes a big difference, right? Like that, that is, that is dealing at a, at a different emotional level for you than somebody who's dealing with a contractor that isn't responsible for the design, or isn't responsible for like all the pieces. And, you know, man, when I think about my business, I've been thinking about it like this too, right? Like I I've been thinking about what's my radically different experience. Hmm. And it's this idea that I think there's a ton of, there's a ton of podcast production agencies. There's a ton of content repurposing agencies, and nobody's out there really pioneering this whole, what you need is an internet talk show, right? Like what you need is this, you want content and you want the relationships that come from content, but you also want to be driving community. And where you start with all of that to like, as a, as a, you know, the nuclear reactor of it is this like interaction point where you have a guest that you're driving the relationship. You have a live audience where you're driving multiple relationships. You have the content engine that then gets repurposed and being accountable for the whole process of content to community, to. Is where I'm at in the whole design build kind of, you know, idea of, of a content stream, man. So I, and then that drives me now and I'm like, you know what, then it makes perfect sense that I'm 10 GS a month, you know, like, whereas before I kind of came in real meekly of thinking, I mean, you remember right. I got like, I was just kind of getting started with my message on it all. I would come in very meekly of just thinking, man, you know, like, I don't know why they're not just doing whatever, but I'm like, no, no, no. If I can take off the entire sense of accountability for all of it from my client, that is a radically different benefit than they're getting, they're going to have a radically different experience. Air go. It doesn't matter what anybody else charges. My price is my price, because nobody else does this. And this is what it costs for me to give you a great experience.

Brett:

Right? Yep. And I don't want to kick myself in the butt here, but eventually as you start going, you're going to have to charge more because you're, and as you get the produce, as you start to do that, and I think that at two points to it, you know, that you, and thanks for sharing that that's exactly what I was seeing in you. But the second point in that is that when you are vertical, what happens, what we're seeing is that from when you have the whole puzzle connected, not only with the client, but with your entire team and then for us, with our trades, and then it would be with you. If you have some people that maybe add some, some help to you in your, in your flywheel and everything that you do is that they buy into it. They see it, they know that it's accountable, they know they're responsible, they taste. And then you create that, those core values that, yeah, there, this is about. The homeowner, the end result, this is what we're driving towards and everybody's going towards that. And that's what I see with what you do is I had that in my head like eight years ago. I'm like, we got it. I go, go around video myself and then do this and put all this and then put it on. Well, back then it was Instagram. And I always call it Snapdragon. My wife and kids laugh. It's snap, snap, a Snapchat. Thank you. So you know, there, but those are the, and I just didn't, I didn't have the who. And then, then when I saw what you were doing, when you sent me what you did and everything now, the timing wasn't right. But it's there, you know, we know that that's what we need to do. And I'm telling you that's as we, as a company and we're starting to get this and we want to drive towards that, we have a vision that we're going towards. That's going to be part of it because if we don't do that, we're not going to reach our vision, reach where we need to go and we're going to be left behind because you're forward thinking you're ahead of the curve. And I love being ahead of the curve. I heard it from. He's he's a living testimony to it. So props to you, to your team. And then, I think you can see that permeate throughout your whole team. Once you start to put that, that together. And then we had a flywheel that started Berlin, and once it picked up some steam, it's, it's rewarding.

Pablo:

I do want to dig into what you're saying, man. this idea that. The more I get my team and my contractors and anybody that's touching this thing to buy into core values and buy into the end result of this being in service of the client. The better things are getting I'm starting to see now. Right? Like I, I went hard into core values as we started growing the team and we do it, you know, we do, I, I copy what Gregg does. Right. We do the core values, call out every team meeting. And we're, it's all like being relationship driven over transactional driven and what I'm starting to find now, man, is like, I was just a couple of weeks ago, I was in Puerto Rico with a, with a new client. And when I came home, everything else that we were doing that I used to like have to handle was better. Yes. And it was really powerful, man. And that reminds me of you telling me from the beginning that you were looking for the who not the what. Right. And then I think about the podcast that I heard you on prior of how you had to. like Kind of hit a reset right? At COVID you had to let go of your sales staff because you didn't, they weren't the right who, and they weren't driving that core values. And you had to reinvest into all that. You want to kind of like talk me through the decision that you had to make in order to align like that.

Brett:

Yeah. That's as a business owner, you always feel, and, and as a leader that you want to take care of your team and, COVID really, I think accelerated a lot of what we were. We had been working on a lot of stuff and 18 and 19 where we were part of, the entrepreneurial operating system. So we were putting things in place, accountability charts, the core values were putting on paper, starting to live and breathe them, do all those things. And I believe what happened was people. So you have, an advantage sometimes when you're new, you can bring in what you need, but I always tell people, and I tell our team, I said, we evolve. You know, that's one of our core values is evolution because when I first started, I just needed a lady that could do bookkeeping pen and paper, you know? And then eventually I needed an accountant. Then after accountant, I needed accounting firm, you know, we evolved, but those people helped us get to where we were. And sometimes that happens with, your team members. And that's probably the hardest thing in, in business for me is that, I feel we're very fair. They know their accountability, they know their roles, they know what they do. And sometimes when you make some of those changes, that's what we started to see. Now, instead of you thought you had a circle in a circle, you thought you had the right person in the right seat. Now, all of a sudden it was an oval, but because we were doing so well you're like, okay, I'll put up with that. You know, we had our best year in sales and, you know, but it was stressing that, you know, we, we would kind of put that stuff under the table. It stress in the team. We were selling stuff. Maybe we shouldn't have, but we can do it. And it created some issues and we kind of ignored them. And I just, and then when COVID hit, I think this would have worked its way out and maybe two or three years. But I think when COVID hit it accelerated it tremendously. Then we found out who was for the team on the team. We made a quick or a very, I, I, it was tough the weekend before they shut everything down. I was, it was emotional the whole weekend. I talked to probably four or five good, business guys. I know a couple of people that are mentors to me through church and biblically, spiritually, you know, what do we do here? You know, we, we, we need to protect our business, but we also need to protect our people. And, we laid everybody off, that, that first weekend, cause our biggest overheads payroll, you know, we have 50, 60 grand a payroll and, and we had nothing, you know, we're going to people's homes. We couldn't, we couldn't do anything. We couldn't even work on it. We couldn't even produce jobs. They wouldn't even let us go out. So, and then we found out, you know, and then they understood who it was. But then, you know, we had one quit within a week, you know, email me, boom gone. I'm like, okay. And then the other one in the mid-year, but I think it was a process that, basically worked itself out quickly. And then when it happened, I was like, you know what? I looked at my wife, she's usually free, you know, you'd think she'd be freaking out. She's a CFO. She was like, oh, where are we going to get all this money? And on top of all that two weeks before COVID we dropped a big chunk of money on this app program that we've talked a little bit about. Now we've got all this going. I'm like, you know what I said, God, you're in control yet. I need to know what's going on here. You know, I'm getting a little bit nervous and my wife just looks at me. She goes, number one, God's got it. Number two. You're fine. You'll win. And I was like, what'd you do with my wife? It was cool. But it was cool though, that she did that. And then I looked at it from a whole different, and that's what we talk about, like with strategic coach and these different things, being around other people that are like-minded in regards to business and that, and in entrepreneur. I said, you know what, 30 years in business, when can you say you can completely reinvent yourself and go to market completely different, have a different point of view and just be able to produce something that is massively bigger than what it was before. And that's how that process at 2020 was tough. Don't don't get me wrong. It was, I went from working 30, 35 hours a week to work in 70 you know survival mode. I was doing what I had to do with the teams. And then the people that stayed that are still there today, we have, are always, we had today. We had our semi-annual, state of the company address. Those are the people that you want. Those are the people that are all in. Those are the people that bought into the culture. Those are the people that are going to take us to that next level. And the ones that weren't going to go to the next level will fall off. But that's hard because you know, one guy was with me 11 years now, other one's seven years on our leadership team. but Sometimes that happens, y'all grow and you, you move on amicably and, you know, thank them for their service.

Pablo:

What would your, what would your company look like today? If you hadn't been forced into that reset? Have you thought about that?

Brett:

Yeah, that, and, and yes, a lot. I think it just accelerated it, you know, it, it, it would have happened and it was, it would have been slower. Yeah. Because I would have given them more chance to, to perform, you know, an opportunity to perform, give them the tools they need to be successful and then see if they would be able to do it. So maybe they would have stayed. Maybe they wouldn't have, but when COVID hit, it just changed. And, and you know, when I look back at it, you know what, 17 months later, this is, you know, the most satisfied I've been in the business because you know what it was, it's a vision, it's a drive. There's something out there that we're all striving for. That's bigger than the company. It's bigger than that. That's what we're, that's the exciting part of it that's really helped us.

Pablo:

And then I was just, I was just having lunch, but, uh, Jerry w who, by the way, I want to invite you to what he does weekly. He does this like office hours. It's a really good group of people. And he's a really smart guy. We were just talking about this idea that people are attracted to people that are on a quest. So if you can, if you can get your team to be on a quest, right? Like if you can, if you can frame it in a way that you're, you're all on a mission together, you're going to be able to get people to cooperate, you know, under you and with you in a, in a very different manner, which is kind of like what I'm hearing from, from what you're saying, right? This like great pain caused this. Striving to like, do this one unified thing, because you had already kind of like set the, set, the guard rails of the core values before it all happened. So it kind of melted away anybody that wasn't part of it and was really aligned with this, with this quest, would you say that's kind of what happened?

Brett:

Yeah, that's a good way to put it. I think that, and Kevin, one of my guys, one of my master carpenters today, he's been with me for 12 years and, it was, he had a really, really good comment perspective. And that's why I like people that are different than me. Cause sometimes I have blinders on and I can just go forward. But when people, I open those up and take those blinders off, but, We all know our accountability, we all know our roles and some of that overlaps, we picked things up, pick the ball up, help each other. But he looked at, you know, as we were talking today. So one of the things I see is 2020, you know, and our team Kevin said that Josh had, they're like, we survived. You basically threw life preservers. We hung on and you pull us all along to get through 2020. And they go, we appreciated that. You know, we took care of them that we, we, you know, they still had their breaks off at Christmas, paid family, all that stuff, even though COVID was there. And then he said, you know, he goes, but this year he said, You're right where you need to be. This is who you are, the visionary part. He sees again, being interacted in this kind of stuff, seeing that growth, like you said, being a ride, they want to be around that. And that's who they've come to be around with me. And I said, you know, I appreciate that. And that's, and I said, they have allowed me to do that because we all know what each of us need. If that makes sense. You know, they know I need to be the visionary. They know I need to be doing those things. And they support that and they know I need my free days to take time off to rejuvenate. I know they need to do that. So it, that was cool. That's basically what your, what was his name? Jerry said he's spot on is that they that's, what you need is that, is that collaboration and that uniqueness that he's you bring to the table and then respect it and build that culture.

Pablo:

Yeah. Yeah. That makes sense, man. I'm glad we went down that rabbit hole. I didn't expect that we're going to have the conversation about that moment, but I, I like it. Like, I'm just like fresh off of this lunch as far as the. As far as the category pirates newsletter, did you, does radically different manufacturing or radically different distribution come into play for you at all?

Brett:

Dude, man, I'm a quick start. Nine. I can change, man. Dude, I saw that. So, you know me, we little, yeah. Like, all right. All right. Let me think here. I mean, I, if I had accountability to everything, could I get my own fabricating countertop company? Could I have my own cabinet manufacturing company? I said if I had all that and was vertically aligned that way I could take this through the whole United States. Cause then I have everything and now I got myself. I wouldn't franchise it. I don't think, but now I have myself a model and I'll just go city to city, just duplicate the model and go after the end result, the end user that I want and find who they are. Find that super consumer, make sure that the categories are about the customer and not about me. Hmm. So yes, absolutely. Yeah,

Pablo:

yeah. That's that's up here. That's so that's what you're spinning on now, man. What, what about the, the, the distribution piece got me really thinking, right? Like I did that. Did that part hit you at all? Like,

Brett:

do you have any notes on that? Yeah, so to me, I do not like, and I may not, where I, people wordsmith things for me all the time. I'll spit them out and I need someone to wordsmith and pharmacy might not to help me. So I do not like anybody to control my proven process and how I deliver my value to my customers. So that is one of them. And I think we've seen it in COVID is that I think that everything was so good. So everybody performed blah-blah-blah, you know, before, but what I'm seeing now is that that's not the case and I don't think it's ever going to be the case again, to the extent that it was before COVID, as far as distribution manufacturing, all that stuff. So I'm like, if I can control all those. Yeah, then I'm able to verdict because the number one thing is that value is my customer is my client. And, you know, that's what, now can afford. Is there a way to scale that and economically do that? You know? Sure. It may not be at first, you know sure. But if that's the vision and we have an end goal for that, and that's amazing that I just, that's where strategic coach really helped me too. Is that being around? I, sometimes I look at myself and I'm like, how did I do that? Yeah, that was cool. You know, like, how did that happen? You know, like me and you talking now. And I think that's great to reflect back, you know, I'm thinking, yeah. You know what we did pretty, we did really well, you know, You know, I led, well, they followed well, you know, but sometimes it's a, you know, you don't want to be like, Ooh, good job. But we need that,

Pablo:

man. I'm I'm in that head space right now. Right? Like right now, by the way, that's the beauty of making content. Right. Because content is like your journal, right. So you get to, you have to reflect on stuff and then you can look back at it and be like, oh no. I'm like, I really am this much far ahead. Right. Like, I'm, I'm a big fan of that piece.

Brett:

Well, that's like Facebook, you know, what, what pops up in your Facebook? Yeah. I'm like, oh, eight years ago. I, I was skinny. No.

Pablo:

Yeah, totally. So why, so I thought, right. Cause in the article it talks about how like radically different distribution and it talks about how like Amazon monetized their logistics department and then monetize their it department. And then

Brett:

yes. That's exactly. Yeah. That's what I'm seeing. How can you create different avenues of revenue out of what you're doing? There's gotta be branches. So yes. That's exactly what I'm thinking. Yeah. That's yeah, that is perfect. Cause. They're they're making money on, on, on the deliveries. Now they're making, they're making money in what, six, seven areas besides selling you. That's why they can sell you that $12 piece at no delivery. Yeah.

Pablo:

So the, yeah, totally man. So I started, I started thinking about that and I'm like, this, this is what I'm doing, right? Like, cause for me, it's my, my, my way to network and meet people is content creation. Right? My distribution of my content also creates that as well. I am what I do for others. I do for myself. So I've been able to build a machine that then serves as monetizing my, you know, like the team that I created to serve, being able to then serve me, allows me to build a world-class team to serve me for free. Right. And then now the other thing, the next level that I'm like hitting right now is I'm starting to get booked to create these like conference activations, right? Like this idea that. It's way more valuable. You know, we used to have this idea of like, oh, you got a booth at a conference and you make like a big booth and you make a big splash for me. It's really all about how you create a great experience at a conference documented through content, but not documenting through content. In order to show that you gave someone a great experience document through content, to show a person thriving in an experience, making them look good and make the content about them in many pieces for them to distribute for themselves. Right? So I'm like, we've got this like penthouse suite rented out and we've got Amanda Holmes. Who's the CEO of the ultimate sales machine empire. And we're doing all this stuff and we're going to make all this content. But now what I'm thinking is man, when I started business, I was just like, how can I have a business that all I get to do is go to conferences because for me pre content, my client acquisition was going to come from. Right. Right. So networking build a relationship, you know, whatever. And now I'm like, damn it, dude of monetize that too. Right. So now I'm getting paid to go to conferences to create content, right? Like I'm, I've, I've like now monetized every piece of my client acquisition part from, from the content creation first. Cause I was like the outer realms of it. So now the in-person interaction, I'm getting paid to go do the in-person interactions that I would have to do to acquire a client. So now I'm like, ah, this is radically different distribution.

Brett:

Yup. For sure. Absolutely. Yeah. So that's,

Pablo:

that's been a real that's that's been a real trip for me, man. Like that. when I, again, like you said, you, you look back right. And to think that I'm like. My my most basic desire was how can I just be incentivized to go to conferences? Cause I love walking into rooms and making friends with people. So the idea that I get to get like, be paid to go do it while doing the business process of everything that I got to do. Like that's one of the things that like landed on me very recently. That's been

Brett:

really cool. Yeah. Yeah. And that's yeah, that's, you know, as I, as I scale things and think about those things is that, you know, I I've, and I think you mentioned it when we, before we got on was, the Jim Collins, you know, the E-Myth, you know, stuff like that, that it's, it's systemized priority. You're able to duplicate things. So that's where, you know, that's what I'm building to. I don't want it to be about me necessarily because I can only take it so far. I become the bottleneck in a certain, you know, when you get things. So that's, you know, that, that's interesting how we can just wild things. Like I can make an AI of me and I can, it'll be able to interact. It'll know who I am to be able to talk with people. Just like I could talk to you right now. I mean, that technology is there, that kind of stuff I think of, of, you know, how can you interactively, you know, with the next generation that's coming up, you know, they're buying things, you know, differently, those distribution points, you know, they're, you know, they want, they don't want to sit through a showroom or sit through a conference. They're like, Hey, give me this, you know, this is what I want. Give me the experience with, you know, how do you monetize that and capitalize on those kinds of things. It is kind of interesting, but yeah, I love that. That thought that, you know, you're, you're, you've, you have different arms that you're starting to monetize things, which is really cool. That's an inspiration for sure. Yeah. Like

Pablo:

I think that I really, like, I loved it. Like, I think that blends between what your services and how you serve yourself and how that monetizes on the backend is like is, is a, is a really interesting space to be in as a, as a business operator, man. Talk to me about the app, man. Like how, at what point, at what point from being a contractor design builder, do you get the stones to, they'd be like, I'm an app guy. Like that's, that's a, that's a pretty, that's a bold move, man.

Brett:

Yeah. gosh, where do we start with that one? So I always have this mindset of, I can do things better than other people can do things or I have a good, one of my, unique abilities or one of my attributes I have StrengthFinders is that I can see things and make them better. So not necessarily maybe reinvent the wheel, but take something somebody has. And. Blow it out of the water. So it's kind of similar to what they're saying about, it, you know, throwing a major wrench in their plans, duplicating somebody where they have, you know, you see one company and then someone else tries to like Peloton and you see, you know, who's the other company. I can't even think of their name. They do all the workout equipment. They're trying to do the same thing with their bike, but it goes side to side, you know? So they're going to lose because that, that super consumers already category. Yes. Yeah. Yeah. So that's where I'm thinking, you know, that it's making sense. Let's create this category that nobody else would this app that nobody else will have, and we'll be so ahead of everyone else. I'm not, you know, then I'm looking at who's my, you know, end user, I'm thinking, you know, do I go after the homeowner, the buyer, do I go after kitchen and bath designers? Do I use, so those are the things going through my head. And I am saying, you know what? I have a business I'm going to, I'm going to make it run through my business. And then what I'm going to do is show other people that they can do the same thing I'm doing and start other satellites and do those things. So I need to have a system that is duplicatable, that someone I could teach you how to be a kitchen, bath designer. And that's the biggest part of that industry. I'm like this industry sucks, you know, it's because they I'm a kitchen, I'm a designer. So this is how, and then you said, then we got to get a contractor and then the contractor doesn't do what the designer says. And then the designer says, well, you're a piece of crap. You don't know how to do that. And the is like, these cabinets are crappy. That's why I can't put them together. You know, it's just a big, that's not what the homeowner wants. You know, what's the end result for your consumer. And that's where this, this app developed, in, in, in my head, put it on paper, put it on flows and started and dropped some money to see if we can create something. And I think that's part of, what's helped us this year in 20, we've been using it, there's four phases to it. So we've been using the first two. So that's, you know, that's really where it's at. It's something that I know. Be a game changer for our industry. This will disrupt this industry in ways that they're going to have to pay attention.

Pablo:

I love that business model of tech creation, the idea that you go from being a service provider to a tech enabled service provider by something that you're developing proprietarily, but you're developing it. Proprietarily in a way that it's going to go from serving just you to serving the industry that has all your same problems to me. Is that is the, that is the future of go-to-market for, for, for the average business tech. I think man, like I did you, did you see that somewhere else? Did I hit you intuitively? Like, are you like following that path just naturally? Or have you seen that pattern recognition and other things like ClickFunnels and like Terminus and these other softwares that are doing that?

Brett:

I I've seen it in, I've always been on that tech, like I had printers in our trucks and laptops, you know, 20 years ago where we were printing estimate right there on the spot. So I've always been in that. How do I make things more efficient, better, different than everybody else is doing. But I think that more so that my mindset is switched. You said change the, the industry. So the, the industry is, is what it is. I'm going to disrupt it by coming in the back way and go after I believe the consumer to my super consumers go after them, because I don't think that it's an uphill battle to go after that industry directly because they have a mindset, you know, designers or designers, they're going to be designers. I went to school, I'm a designer, I'm a CA so my goal is how can I help the contract, the contractor? So the ads. So those that's what really drove me was I see these contractors, they're really good at what they do. If they don't want to do all the legwork, they want it to be handed to them and let me put together, you know, and then also the homeowner is you and your wife let's make this easy for you. This isn't rocket science. Let's make this easy stress-free and just let them be able to design their kitchens and baths, and then let's get them with the contractor that has the whole blueprint and that's what we're doing. so I think that's how we'll disrupt the industry, because they're going to have to pay attention to how we're doing it now. And if they don't pay attention, then they're going to be locking their doors.

Pablo:

I mean, that's super smart, man. Like I, like, I, like, I love the entire philosophy soup to nuts of it all. And just the, the gumption to pull the, to pull the trigger, right? Like, like, like the gumption of just like, all right, man. I've been, I've been working in homes for years now. I'm going to develop something in like a tech ecosystem and

Brett:

it's going to be mine. Yeah. And you're absolutely right. Cause I don't need to do this. I'm financially set. I don't, you know, I mean, I'm not a billionaire, but you know, I don't need to, I mean, I could. Yeah, but that's not me, you know? And that's, and my wife understands, she still thinks I'm an alien, but she doesn't, you know, she understand that a little bit, but she's learned to over time and then being around other people that, you know, it's you, that's what drives me is that I need to create value on this planet while I'm here. Not only spiritually, but also still create value content for people and creation to help and, and leave something, you know, better than when I got here. So that's the biggest thing that drives me is that, yeah, I could be content, just sit here. I tried that for a couple of years and it drove me nuts. I hated it because I, I can't, if I'm not creating, if I'm not advancing, if I'm not, if, if I've arrived, I might as well just, and I think that also helps people, Dan Sullivan has said it, and some people in strategic coach is that I'll never retire. You know, I I'm always going to be doing something. Cause once I retire and a definition of retirement from Charlie Epstein is that, um, So I desire to be able to create things and do things even when I'm 70, 80, 90, a hundred, 110 years old, you know, let's keep it going. You know? And, and you know, I mean, we're a couple of generations different yet the enthusiasm I have enthusiasm, you have I love it. So that's what drives me for these, these things. And also to help people. I that's, the biggest thing I saw was these home, dude. I can't tell you. I used to take them. I used to do a different route where I took him to a wholesaler and they would go pick things. And there was this 20,000 square foot showroom. And I'm not kidding you, Pablo. I have people stand there and start crying because it was so overwhelming Yeah, that was just too much for him, you know, and, and I'm like, there's gotta be a better way to do this. Then here pick from these 6,525 faucets. So that's what drove me, you know,is the betterment of a person and, and, and, and couples and, and getting a result that they deserve. They, they work hard for their money and it should be as seamless and as Stressless as possible to, to get them, you know what they're looking to get. Bottom line

Pablo:

as the drive for wanting to create value for others, been something that you've always had, or has it been something that's grown inside of you or was it something that hits you like a brick, you know, a ton of bricks?

Brett:

Yeah, it was, I I've always been a very generous person, very caring person. I've always been really great with kids, stuff like that. And so that's always been in my DNA since I was a kid, is that, I've always been able to, like we talked earlier, I've always been able to see those things, the kid off to the corner, this person's struggling with something, you know, or an adult, you know, how to, I could walk in a room. And, one of my, you know, when I send out all my letters to see what my unique value or was, it was, it was really cool because I can walk in a room and interact and engage with anybody with all across all types of. Demographics and ethnicity and all that. So, you know, and, and then, and, and genuinely do it. So that's always been who I am and I, and I believe that's what drives me to help others is being able to do that. And I have to be careful cause that's sometimes can be, I can over-commit myself. Yeah. Cause I want to be able to do it for everybody. So, you know, that's where I have a wife and some other people that helped me to kind of hone that in a little bit so that I don't get overwhelmed and, and take on too much. And then I'm not a nice person at home. That's always been there.

Pablo:

I feel like you're describing me, man. Right? Like, you know that the young kid that's always been friendly, that then gets overwhelmed by always wanting to come crowd, please, everybody to then finding out how to balance that with the people the

Brett:

most. Yes. And if you, if you do it with the ones that matter the most. They will be able to reach far more people than what you and I could reach if we did it with 20 people, which is kinda cool, you know, it's that generational thing. Like, you know, I don't know, like when I talk to people and you know, I, I go to church, I'm a God-fearing man and I live those principles and tell people about Jesus and those kinds of things. Yeah. And how I act just as a person. I don't know how that can, that, that, that may change something three generations from now. I may never know that yet as a person that's in same thing with, you know, I think that's so great that, you know, I can have those ones that I'm throwing sticks down and they're picking them up. And then we interact and then who knows who they can affect and who knows, who they can touch in life is kind of cool,

Pablo:

buddy. This has been a phenomenal conversation like this as this has totally over-delivered for me, man. Like I had really high expectations, but I feel like the places we went on this. You know, some of the stuff that I've, that I knew was coming was better than I thought. And then a bunch of stuff. I had no idea what was coming was, has, has been amazing. It's especially this little last piece. I just want to thank you, man. Like you, you really, the way that you described yourself, you are a very, very generous person. You show you you've shown up in my life in a very generous way. You continue to, to show up that way you have added as a internet friend that we are like, you've added so much value to my life, to the point that by the time I took my first call with you, I felt like I already know, knew you and loved you. You know what I mean? Like, so it's, it's just really, really. Man, it's really fulfilling to be able to, to grow relationships like this with somebody who is, like you said, maybe a generation to half or two generations above me to see that the path in front of me is, is, is, is, is well-trodden by, by people that are doing this and are succeeding and can continue to be this way and to have an archetype like you, just really fills me full of hope. And, I'm really happy about our friendship, man. Thanks for, thanks for being in my life and thanks for doing this. thanks for, thanks for coming on.

Brett:

Yeah, you're welcome. And ditto brother. I'm, like I said, I'm humbled grateful to be here, so it's, it's an honor. And I always say someone did something for me like that and, you know, Hey, you know, and someone's doing it for me now, you know, we were all, you know, have someone above us or below us and you know, we're picking each other up and helping each other out. So yeah, that's I love it, man. I feel the same way. And do we're going to be going to. We're going to be going to meet in person soon. So that's going to be awesome, man.

Pablo:

Yeah, yeah, yeah. It is going to be awesome. And I can't wait pumped about it.