Life and Mission

How to Beat Imposter Syndrome, with Jennifer Harshman

April 19, 2021 Kay Helm / Jennifer Harshman Episode 62
Life and Mission
How to Beat Imposter Syndrome, with Jennifer Harshman
Chapters
Life and Mission
How to Beat Imposter Syndrome, with Jennifer Harshman
Apr 19, 2021 Episode 62
Kay Helm / Jennifer Harshman

How do we get past that nagging feeling that we aren't qualified or "ready" to do that thing we're supposed to do?

Imposter syndrome is that feeling many of us get when we start something new, where we question our qualifications, our abilities, or even our right to be involved at all. Jennifer Harshman works with people who want to make a difference, mostly writers and entrepreneurs. She says imposter syndrome is something we can all struggle with, but there are ways to overcome it.

  • Talk back to your inner critic
  • Strike a power pose
  • Take a small step every day
  • Celebrate taking that small step, no matter how it goes

What's your strategy to beat imposter syndrome?

About
Jennifer Harshman shows people who want to make a difference exactly what to put in their books and blog posts and where, so they get the clarity and confidence they need to start writing immediately.
Connect with Jennifer at harshmanservices.com
facebook.com/jennifer.harshman



Support the show (https://www.paypal.me/kayhelm)

Show Notes Transcript

How do we get past that nagging feeling that we aren't qualified or "ready" to do that thing we're supposed to do?

Imposter syndrome is that feeling many of us get when we start something new, where we question our qualifications, our abilities, or even our right to be involved at all. Jennifer Harshman works with people who want to make a difference, mostly writers and entrepreneurs. She says imposter syndrome is something we can all struggle with, but there are ways to overcome it.

  • Talk back to your inner critic
  • Strike a power pose
  • Take a small step every day
  • Celebrate taking that small step, no matter how it goes

What's your strategy to beat imposter syndrome?

About
Jennifer Harshman shows people who want to make a difference exactly what to put in their books and blog posts and where, so they get the clarity and confidence they need to start writing immediately.
Connect with Jennifer at harshmanservices.com
facebook.com/jennifer.harshman



Support the show (https://www.paypal.me/kayhelm)

Kay:

Welcome to Episode 62 of the Life and Mission Podcast. I'm Kay Helm. And today my guest is Jennifer Harshman. You know that feeling when you're about to step into something new and you start questioning yourself. Am I qualified to have what it takes? Why would anybody Listen to me anyway? imposter syndrome can really keep us from pursuing our dreams, but it doesn't have to. And we'll share some practical ways to combat imposter syndrome in just a minute. But first, I want to thank Katie Horner, for sponsoring the podcast for this month of April. She's got a virtual business retreat coming up, and I'm gonna let her tell you a little bit about that. And then we'll be back with my interview with Jennifer Harshman.

Ad:

Are you stuck in your office spinning your wheels is the time for you to get away from your business so you can focus on the business, maybe a retreat. I'm Katie Horner of the four year success podcast. And though my husband and I started out in full time ministry, living well below the poverty line, our six figure business now gives us ministry opportunities that far outweigh the ones we had in full time ministry. Join me and my husband tap on April 30. At the get out of the boat, Christian business virtual retreat, to recharge your batteries. And let us show you how fun it can be to walk out your faith in your business with joy and confidence. Because doing the business that God created you to do can be your best worship. To get out of the boat. Christian business retreat is April 30, from 11am to 7pm. And you can attend from anywhere online. We can't wait to see you there. You can get all the info and register for your ticket right now at getoutoftheboat.com

Kay:

Jennifer Harshman. Thank you so much for joining us today.

Jennifer:

Thank you for having me. Kay.

Kay:

Yeah, I'm so glad to have you on. I had heard a lot about you before, I actually got a chance to talk with you, of course, as the editor, and I'm a writer. And you know, I called you up the other day to just kind of learn more about what you do. And we just hit it off had a great conversation. So I am thrilled to have you on the show.

Jennifer:

I'm so excited to be here.

Kay:

Awesome. One of the things that we talked about was that you like to speak about imposter syndrome. And of course, I jumped at that. Because I know among the people that are starting new things, whether it's a new business, or writing a book, or just a new ministry or stepping into any new space, there's this thing imposter syndrome that we hear a lot about that we feel it, but maybe you're not really sure what it is, and and what was involved. And of course, the biggest question, how do I get over it? How do we get past it? It's so that's what we're going to talk about today. Great, that's where we're gonna go. But first, let us know a little bit about you and what you do.

Jennifer:

Okay, so I help people to take their ideas and their writing and get it out into the world in a way that will help them to make a difference.

Kay:

So you run into people that maybe are dealing with this imposter syndrome thing quite a bit if it's especially if it's their first time around.

Jennifer:

Absolutely. And even people who have written 10 books already still deal with it. Oh, man,

Kay:

yeah, I was writing this summer, I was writing the first draft for a client's book, and went to my ghost writing coach who we both know, Nick and said, Hey, you know, now I have this thing done. And it's time to turn it in. But I'm, like, afraid to turn it in. Because I've done it. I know the material. And I know, I know, it's good material. But it's like, there's this moment of pause, you know, like, when do you get and I think somebody else in the group was asking, when do you get over that? And he's like, You don't? It's just

Jennifer:

exactly.

Kay:

Which was, in a way encouraging. So what do you find with people that are stepping out writing that book first time, 10th time? What's going on there?

Jennifer:

Well, everyone who doesn't fall into the category of someone who has narcissistic personality disorder, everyone else is going to wonder if they're good enough if what they have done is good enough if it will be well received, if they're going to be criticized and cut down, you know, all of those things run through our minds, anytime we want to put something new out and public view. So like you said, Everyone goes through it. It never really goes away. It's something that you have to learn to kind argue with, you can argue with that voice in your head. And you can present it with evidence that what you have done is well researched, it's well put together, that you do have the experience, you've done books A, B, and C, or whatever instance, you know, whatever project that you're working on, you've done this before you've put the good work into it. And so you do have to kind of go to war with that voice in your head. And you have to present it with evidence. And sometimes you silly as it may seem, just talk to shut up. Oh, yeah.

Kay:

Yeah, because it's that you're right. It's kind of one of those ever present things for me. But I was I was wondering, I was in another conversation earlier this week, where that we were talking about limiting beliefs. And imposter syndrome, kind of that phrase never came up, that name never came up. But there were different things that we believe that probably are drivers for what we end up calling imposter syndrome. You know, little mindset. So are there are there mindsets that you've identified with the people that you're coaching?

Jennifer:

Usually, it comes in the form of critical phrases or sentences like, I'm not good enough. And those questions, will it be accepted or criticized? Those types of things? It's usually taking the form of some sort of inner critic voice in our head.

Kay:

think that that, will it be criticized? Or will I be criticized one, especially in this day and age, if you put anything out? Probably that has any kind of substance to it, you will be so and you know what, that's that's okay. And that and that doesn't mean it feels good. Right probably meant means you said something important.

Jennifer:

Something to keep in mind. It's something I learned from Tim Ferriss, and he's one of those people, like a lot of people love him or hate him. But there's not a lot of in between, but he does have some gold. And it's SW, SW, SW. SW. And what that stands for is some will want what it is that you offer, some won't. So what someone's waiting. So the key is just to find your people create that good stuff that you make, and put it out there. And as much as possible. Ignore the critics, unless they say something that is constructive that you can take and use to make yourself or your work better.

Kay:

Yeah, so we're not completely closed off to criticism or critique and, or even advice of, of some sort, even if it stings, and which is how we grow. Right. Right. So that's, that's huge, though, too. Right? We are right for your actual reader, right for the people that are your people. Not for the critics, because if you're writing for the critics, you're always going to hedge.

Jennifer:

Mm hmm. Yeah, that that can paralyze anyone. If you're thinking about all of the negative possibilities, then you will be paralyzed. And what we want to do is avoid that as much as possible. You know, that voice pipes up, you speak truth to it, you tell it to go Be quiet, you know, you may even think it's a thank you for looking out for me. I've got this, I'm going to do this little thing. And I'm just gonna see what happens. There's no worry, there's no risk, you know, you just have to talk to it, and then just go and do it.

Kay:

Do you know where the term imposter syndrome came from? Like that phrase, it's become so common now.

Jennifer:

I don't know where the phrase itself came from. But the first person that I heard talking about it in this type of way was Amy Cuddy. And she did a TED talk that your listeners might want to go and see. And she talks about doing what she calls the Superman pose. So you put your hands on your hips, fists on your hips, puff your chest out, feel all big and confident. And you hold that pose, breathing deeply for about two minutes. And that will change. You know, changing your physiology like Tony Robbins talks about changing your physiology changes your psychology. So moving your body in a certain way, holding your body in a certain posture changes how you feel, it changes how you think it changes how you come across. So she recommends like before a job interview, or some negotiation or something else that's important to you meeting with someone, go and do that. Oh, she's like going to the restroom, shut the door in a stall and just stand there like Superman. And then when you go in to interact with that other person, you'll feel so much better about yourself and you'll come across better.

Kay:

That's cool and adds a little fun to your meeting too. So you got to get there a little early. Go do your pose. Come out and do the thing. What are there things you think We call imposter syndrome, but it's really something else. I mean, can it be like an excuse for what's really procrastination or something like that?

Jennifer:

It definitely could be. But I think procrastination has something that's underneath it. That's just a shield. So underneath it is that fear, perfectionism, things like that, that we want to put up a wall, some sort of a shield between us, and that risk or danger that we perceive is out there. So we will find other things that are so urgent and important that we just have to take care of, and we put off that project that we know will really make a difference in our business, or really serve our clients better, or something else that makes a difference. And as people were saying, Now moves the needle, it's so easy to get caught in that. So the the cure for me is to break things down into the smallest possible step. So that it looks so easy when you look at that goal. Like for example, I'll use writing since I coach a lot of writers. Mostly people will think, Oh, I have to write my book. No, that is giant. A Well, okay, I'll break it down, I have to write a chapter. No, that's massive, too. You don't want to do that you want to either set a very small word count goal, or a very small time limit goal. And when I tell people what I want them to start with, most of them either laugh or scoff, because they think there's no way this is going to make any difference. How on earth, so 50 words per day, or two minutes of writing? That's where I start people off. Look at that, you're like, Well, of course, I can do two minutes. I can write 50 words in a day. Are you kidding me? I want it to be so small that it feels ridiculous. And then they go and do it. And then they can keep going. So write your 50 words or your two minutes. And when you've hit that mark, if you're feeling good, you've hit your stride, you've you overcame that inertia, keep going. And then you get to feel really good about what you did. And so then you look back when that imposter syndrome hits and the voice in your head start saying, okay, you're not good enough. Is this gonna be okay, you look back at what you did, you're like, Look, three days in a row. This week, I wrote for however many minutes, I produce these words, I have done this article, I have contributed to this book. I have done all these things. Thank you for being concerned for me little inner critic, but we're gonna be just fine.

Kay:

That's great. Because you know, when I honestly when when you were talking about a word count, I was thinking, Oh, she's gonna say 500 words. And then you said 50 and two, just two minutes. And and you're right at first, my first reaction was was that so small, but but it's, it really kind of flips a switch when I think about it, because you jump in, you've got you've already won before you start. Because you know, I got that that's a that's an absolute, I got this.

Jennifer:

You get to feel successful, you get to be successful. And success begets success. So it's built on itself. And once you have that confidence of Yeah, I just totally smashed that two minute writing goal. I'm gonna keep going today. I love 10 minutes. And you know, maybe tomorrow I do more. But when you keep it small, you make it really difficult to fail. And you make it really easy to succeed. So when you succeed, you get to feel great. And whatever you feel great about you want to do more up?

Kay:

Yeah, that's so true. That's why we start kids off with T ball instead of pitching to them, right? It's the same thing. We put this up here and help you swing, but it works. It does it. Yeah. And you get the big smile. And when absolutely helps. And it's amazing too, because even 50 words a day can really the big challenge is getting the ball rolling in the first place, right? Yeah, that's cool. I had a huge bout of writer's block a couple years ago, and I had to give myself permission to write jibberish just to write, I think it was 100 words or 150 words a day. Just to put that many words down and I laid out ground rules for myself. They do not have to be full sentences. They do not even have to be related. They can be random thoughts, and I was traveling at the time and I would sit and be blocked. Even with that even with those really loose kind of parameters and So I said, Okay, at the end of the day, I'm just going to write descriptions of things I saw today. Right. And so again, it was at, you know, palm trees, it was sand on the road, dirty shoes, you know what, things like that, and none of it is anything anybody's gonna see. But it just was all about overcoming the inertia and, and working that discipline of sitting down and doing some writing.

Jennifer:

That is a very smart approach.

Kay:

And so eventually, yeah, we did, we did break through, but it was, it was a struggle, but giving myself permission not to sit down and write something that somebody was gonna see was also a big part of that took so much of the pressure off, and I think I lean towards perfectionism. Yesterday, I wrote something. And immediately, I posted it in social media. And I did that, because I knew if I kept fiddling with it, to make it into a blog post, or make it into some kind of story that, you know, was going to put somewhere as a writing sample or part of a book or whatever, yeah, that it would either never get finished, or I would just, I would miss them the moment and for me, it was really about the moment. And it's like everybody, everybody is, it's out there on social media, and people are just responding. It hit a nerve. And it was and that's the other thing, I think, what we think we're trying to do, or what we think is important, isn't really the thing that's important.

Jennifer:

Yeah, sometimes the things that we think like, how are we expect certain blog posts to be the ones that are, these are our pillar posts, this is Cornerstone content. And then people really connect with things that when we look at that, we're like, What? Oh, I totally understand what you're saying.

Kay:

But you see, you just word that you use the word Connect there. And, and that's the thing, because we write to what we write, to teach we write, to inform we write to get somebody to buy something, we have a purpose and our writing. But if we don't connect, we have really missed the boat. And that's, I think, some of those things that we think maybe are not our best pieces, really connect with people. I'm reading john Maxwell book right now about connection? I can't, I'm trying to think of the title of it right now. It's, I think it's everybody communicates but few people connect. If that's not the title, it's the premise. Okay. So something like that, you could probably type that in and find the book. And it's, it's just about how do you connect and have a saying that if you really want to communicate, if you really want to get your ideas across, it's really about connecting with people.

Jennifer:

Now, a lot of people will try to gauge their peace, you know, how good of a piece of writing is this? How successful is this book, post, whatever the item might be? And a lot of times people will look at certain metrics, like, how many sales did they make? Or how many pageviews have they had? And that can correlate with? How much do people connect with it, but it doesn't always. And so that's, that's the metric that I would use is, do I get emails or Facebook messages that say, oh, my goodness, that post that chapter, that piece, really touched my heart really gave me information really changed my life, something that makes a difference. Because that's, that's why we exist, you know, to be in relationship to serve to make that difference in the world. And so if somebody contacts you and says, Hey, this, hit home with me back to heart, and, and use it and do more of that. And also keep in mind that if one person contacts you, there are 99 others who thought about it felt the same way maybe wanted to, but just didn't get around to contacting you about it. So if one person said something, a lot of people are thinking that same good thing.

Kay:

Yeah, yeah, that's true. And just in case you're wondering, I don't think the reverse is true. I think people that complain are more, they're faster, and more likely, like they they like to Yep, whereas the compliments tend to sit back. And so you know, there's going to be use a bigger number for the cuff when you're trying to parse that out.

Jennifer:

So the other day, I was talking with a friend of mine who Was she's afraid of going on podcasts. And she has been, she's been on a couple. One of them, the host, really wasn't very nice to her was confrontational. And I'm not sure like playing hardball or something. And so now she is very gun shy, she's scared to death ago on different podcasts. And she and I know a lot of podcasters, we have a lot of mutual friends who host their own shows. And she's very heavily involved in community theater. So I told her, you can take what you're what you already know, and connect it in a way to the thing that you want to learn how to do. And so definitely imposter syndrome big time. And so I said, here's where you can start, you know, theater, you know, the term scripts, you know, the term role. And so you can start with people that you are friends with, who have their own shows. And you can talk to them about going on the show, just have a conversation and say what I'm really afraid of doing this, I'm you know, baby steps here? And could we set a couple of questions ahead of time? Could I know what's coming who prepare me. And then she can write that answer, write it out, prepare it, practice it, get comfortable talking, which she gets on stage, she's great. She teaches she's great. So you're connecting it to what she already knows. And I said, then you have your script, so to speak. And you can move from what you do know and where you are comfortable. And just inch into this new territory, where you're not so comfortable yet. But because you're setting those safe parameters, you're talking with someone that already knows likes and trusts you. And it's a great, safe environment. They're training wheels, you know, that kind of thing. Then you can move into that new area. And then after that, build your confidence, do the reps. And then I've got evidence to argue with that inner critic and say, Look, I went on Sara's show. I went on Todd's show, I went on my show. I rocked it every time I had a fun time. It was a total blast. I'm gonna go on the other person's show that I don't know yet. There'll be two.

Kay:

Yeah, that's good. That's good. And that goes with the kind of the small steps, right? So we've got so these steps, we've got our power pose. We've got our talk back to the inner critic. Okay, take a small step.

Jennifer:

like crazy when you take that step no matter

Kay:

what, celebrate Yeah, and celebrate. And that's huge. You know, I'm going to loop back to some of my nonprofit friends and ministry friends back in the fundraising space, which is another one of my my favorite topics. And that's something we forget to do. We always forget to celebrate, or we were married Mary, I've had her on the podcast before. Yeah, she says we celebrate in our office, we go, Oh, this big gift came in, oh, this is awesome. This is gonna help us do this. And this and this, and this. And this. And we forget to celebrate with the person who gave it. We just we do because it's that moment of, oh my gosh, you know, this came in. And and we've got to bring that Oh, that wow moment out into the public and celebrate it with the people who made it possible. And people who, you know, who are cheering us on the people that we're actually writing to the people that are actually doing things for a lot of times, again, that's a connection issue. Right?

Jennifer:

We have we found this work. That, while it is a very good thing, it also limits that celebration time. And you know, we think okay, on to the next thing. Great, you know, okay, that's great, good next. And it's said, if we would just press pause in there, between Okay, that's good. I'm done. Next, if we press pause in there, then we can give ourselves some whitespace, which we all desperately. And we can also give ourselves that time to go and thank that person and make that connection. Yeah, I send out greeting cards, old fashioned snail mail, right. I send out greeting cards just just because and for any kind of a thank you thing. And so many people have posted pictures on social media with my card, because I sent them a card and I'm like, it's not a big deal to me to send it. But it is a big deal to them to receive it. Yeah, but just that minute or two that it takes can make a big difference.

Kay:

Yeah, that's huge. I mean, do I do we spend too much time working I think we do.

Jennifer:

I think our culture glorifies it. Over word and, and other cultures. Some other cultures do too. I believe in Japan, they have a word for he worked himself to death and died on the factory floor. Wow, there's a term for that when somebody works and works and works till they literally die at work, and it's, it's glorified. And it's not healthy. In 2006, I went through cascading systems failure, which was triggered by adrenal burnout. A team of doctors at a university hospital couldn't do a thing for me, for me to go home, kiss my babies Goodbye, and pick out my coffin. Because I had worked myself to the point that my body said, we're done no more. And it took a good year to and I can't even say recover because my body never got back to where it was before. But it took seven months to get off of the terminal list and move to a critical health list. Wow. And then I had to relearn, like, everything about how to structure my life and how what was important. Life had put succeeding and working and providing, I had put the hat at the top. You know, I mean, right behind my face. It was it was bad work. And then my family, and I was not taking good care of my body. All I would push it until the crop. So when people talk about overwork, I'm like, I can raise my hand as one of the guiltiest people ever. When it comes to that, and we do we put emphasis on the wrong things. Yeah, we relationships are so much more important than how many hours you log.

Kay:

Yeah, so to true, thank you for sharing that it is quite the warning, because we put such a value on, you know, we hear entrepreneurs and talking about hustle and killing it. And it's okay for killing it. What are we killing? ourselves? Right? Oh, yeah. I mean, okay, let's think about this a little bit. And for what, you know, what really was the payoff? Bible talks about that will be known by a fruit? What's the fruit of it? Is it burnout and broken relationships? Is it poor health? All these things? If that's the fruit is probably something that really needs to be examined. Yeah. And some of that pressure too, though, you know, it's, we put pressure on ourselves. There's external expectations that other people have or expectations that we think other people have. of us. And we and let's, we talked about imposter syndrome. One of the big parts of that, too, is comparison. Can you speak to that for?

Jennifer:

Oh, goodness, yeah, a friend of mine just wrote a book called measure up. And it is all about comparing ourselves to other people we think that we do, and we don't see a script that talks about that type of thing. Like, take care of your own behavior, your own actions, your own problems. And don't look at what other people are receiving what other people are doing, you know, the parable of the vineyard is a great example. Like, look, I'm paying this person, this, this, what I pay them is between me and them, of your business. So what someone else is doing, or how they are succeeding. And you know, we don't see the whole picture. Yeah, even if we're really close to that person, we see the tip of the iceberg. Oh, this excess, what's visible, that's what we see. We don't know what went into it. We don't know how long they've been working at that thing, or how hard or what they have sacrificed or how much they have invested. So comparison is the thief of joy. And so I try, I'm guilty of it, too. I look at other people like oh gosh, wow, I wish I could do that. But I have to remind myself, comparison is the thief of joy. Why can do what I can do? I will do the next right thing. I will do what's in front of me. And I will be so happy for that other person. While not feeling like I have to do the same thing they're doing.

Kay:

that's a that's a sermon. I think we all need to hear on a regular basis. Yeah, comparison. So perfectionism, comparison over work. Anything else? Are there other things that are kind of our gotchas that lead us into that imposter syndrome?

Jennifer:

not having enough experience, or even if it's vicarious experienced with a particular thing can make us feel like we need to slip into imposter syndrome. So if we wait Some research, we've watched some videos, we've watched some other people do these things, and we feel at least knowledgeable about what goes into the thing that can help us to feel more confident. So when something that's completely new to us, we're completely unfamiliar with it. I think that's, and somebody says, Hey, are you gonna do this thing and you're like, I don't have the first clue I've never. And so it's so easy to feel anxiety, and to slip right into imposter syndrome. Whereas if you were to do just a little bit of research, you might see, oh, it's connected to something I've already done. This is similar in this way. And this way, I can learn about this, I can go and do this thing, and be successful with it and feel great about it. So I think doing a little bit of research can go a long way. Just don't get stuck in analysis, paralysis. Some of us can fall down the rabbit hole of research. And you know, that's, that's a great way to procrastinate. And it's a great way to put things off. And so you do you have to be careful with that, too. Yeah,

Kay:

yeah, doing more research, taking one more course, practice, dude, you're right. And it can just be this thing that really is a form of procrastination, you know, you were talking about knowing a little bit about something. And then just jumping into it, I used to work in broadcast television, tiny, is a tiny, tiny station in a top 50 market. So there's a little little bit of pressure there. But you know, we used to joke about the viewer, you know, the one viewer, and and so there was this live show that we were doing, and we were in the countdown to go live and I was the floor manager. So if you're not familiar with television production, the four managers out there in the studio with the people who are on camera, and that's the person who gives the hand signals, you know, and I'm doing the countdown for three. And we were in we were within 10 seconds of going on the air. And I had a coughing fit. And I'm coughing and coughing and coughing and coughing, I'm trying to did count down. And the director comes flying out of the control room and says switch places with me. And I tried to argue and he just goes Five, four, and run into the control room, plop myself in the director's chair, and go three. And we're on and now I'm directing this television show. I knew the show backwards and forwards because we'd done it, you know, every week for however many weeks. But all of a sudden, I was directing this show, and I became the director after that. He didn't really like doing it anyway. So that kind of just being thrown in. And he said something. He did say as I'm, you know, looking at him, like what are you thinking and I'm coughing, so I can't really argue with it. Because I'm coughing so much. But he said you can do it. He but that because he said you can do it. I sat there for that whole show doing the thing. telling myself he said I could do it. He said I could do it. He said I could do it. So you know we all I think if you can find an encourager you know that role. So as an encourager, what are some things I could do as somebody encourager?

Jennifer:

Oh, I love that question. So, so many things you can observe where they get stuck, or where they feel like, okay, you can see the anxiety building in their body. You can observe them visually, you can talk to them and ask them questions, and say, Hey, what is it about this thing that scares you? And then you can address that particular thing? Because if we can get specific with whatever it is, then we can speak to it. Yeah, a general statement, oh, hey, rah, rah, you can do this thing. That's not I mean, it's great. It feels good. But it's not as effective. As if they say, hey, you have been on set for 52 episodes, you've seen everything we've done, you know, all of the terminology and you know, what we're trying to accomplish with this show. And I have seen you step in in a B and C situations. And you did great. You're gonna do great and situation D as well. Yeah, that's good.

Kay:

Yes. Yeah, that's good. Well, is there anything that we did not cover that that you want to say about? imposter syndrome?

Jennifer:

I want to talk about that. Five seconds. So people are familiar with that in in terms of dropping food on the floor or something, right. But it also applies to within connection. So if you get an idea, someone asks you to take over a task, or whatever the situation might be, you're considering doing the thing. If you hesitate, then your brain starts throwing up all these reasons why you can't do it, and it starts putting up roadblocks and you start feeling anxious, and then you question and, and doubt yourself, and all of those things start to happen. But if you take action, within five seconds of that idea being presented to you, then you short circuit, that whole mess that can start to happen. And you don't have to do a giant step on it. Just remember those tiny little baby steps, break it down into the smallest piece that you came and take some kind of action on it. Right, then as soon as something comes up. I'm notorious for buying domain names. Something somebody will mention, oh, hey, you should write a book. I'll go buy the domain name for the book. And it cost me 10 bucks, no big deal year rolls around, and I decide that I don't want to do anything. I'll just let that expire. Yeah. But if I didn't take action, right, then I would have questioned it. Maybe somebody else would have bought the thing, especially if it's, if I'm at a conference, and we're talking about things and there are five other domain name buyers. So you know, take action, even if it's the smallest step as soon as you possibly can.

Kay:

Yeah, that's good. Yeah, jump on it. Jennifer, thank you so much for joining us today. It's been a pleasure to have you on here with us.

Jennifer:

Thank you for having me. Kay. I absolutely love being able to be of service to your audience in any way that I can. And if they if they would like to connect with me, I would love that.

Kay:

How could they do that?

Jennifer:

You can find me on Harshman services comm you can find me on Facebook at Jennifer Harshman.

Kay:

Awesome, okay, all the links will be in the show notes as usual. Thanks, Jennifer. You have you wrestled with imposter syndrome. Send me an email, tell me about it connect at life and mission Comm. Let me know how you dealt with it or which of Jennifer's tips you'll put into action. And if you found this episode helpful, you probably know at least one other person who could also benefit from Listen, there's a little Share icon somewhere on your podcast app, hit share right now and let somebody know that you thought of them. Let them know that you believe in them. We'll have a new show in two weeks. This is the life ambition podcast. Find your voice tell your story. Change the world.