Your Digital Marketing Coach with Neal Schaffer

216: How to Use Influencers to Promote Your Business [Tom Augenthaler Interview]

June 24, 2021 Neal Schaffer
Your Digital Marketing Coach with Neal Schaffer
216: How to Use Influencers to Promote Your Business [Tom Augenthaler Interview]
Show Notes Transcript

Influencer marketing should be a natural extension of your own marketing, and perhaps there is no better place for it than in B2B companies.

Listen in to my interview with The Influencer Marketer Tom Augenthaler as we discuss the nuts and bolts of influencer marketing and how to begin implementing it for your business today.

Tom Augenthaler Links

Neal Schaffer Links

Neal Schaffer:

influencer marketing for b2b somehow, a lot of marketers only associate influencer marketing for b2c for consumer brands, Instagram tik tok. What about b2b influencer? marketing is as important maybe it's even more important for b2b marketers than it is for b2c. Whether you're b2b or b2c, it doesn't matter. I think you're gonna have a lot of great takeaways about influencer marketing on this episode of The maximize your social influence podcast. Welcome to the maximize your social influence podcast with Neal Schaffer, where I help marketers, entrepreneurs and business owners grow their businesses using innovative marketing techniques, leveraging the concept of digital influence throughout digital and social media. Hey everybody, welcome to episode number 216 of the maximize your social influence podcast. My name is Neal Schaffer. I am a digital and social media marketing author, speaker, consultant and educator. For those of you that do not know me, I am here to help you really understand how to maximize your digital social media marketing efforts through the unique concept and the unique perspective of influence. And therefore when I have a podcast about influencer marketing, it really talks directly to what this podcast is really all about. I don't like to limit myself to directly speaking on it because I believe that influence really permeates everything that we do in digital and social as you know from previous episodes, but today really hits home. And today is a special interview with Tom Ogun. thaller. Now Tom is someone that had reached out to me and he has a URL the influencer marketer calm so obviously Tom knows his stuff. But what's amazing is that and I had never met him before never really talked him before before we did the interview is it was such a natural conversation and we had so much in common not just our perspectives on influencer marketing, but also our professional backgrounds both coming from the b2b space so I think you're really gonna love Tom's perspective on influencer marketing and really digital marketing as a whole so let's jump right into it my interview with Tom og and dollar the influence marketer All right, everybody. Welcome to the maximize your social influence podcast today. I'm really excited to have on as a special guest, Mr. Tom, Ogun. thaller Yes, I think I got the pronunciation right. But more importantly, Tom is also someone that delves deep into the world of influencer marketing and today although I've recorded at least one episode on b2b influencer marketing specific, Tom is going to take us down a little bit different angle as to how we can look at influencers in a different perspective, and how we can best leverage them for our business. So Tom, welcome to the podcast.

Tom Augenthaler:

Hey, thanks for having me. I'm, I'm thrilled to be here and great job on pronouncing my last name that was well done.

Neal Schaffer:

And I'm usually pretty bad at that. So thank you. Yeah, Tom and I have we've had to deal with you know, work schedules and all sorts of emergencies including Tom is in Houston, Texas, which isn't always the warmest to places recently, like you think it is. So Tom, you are you're someone else that is heavily involved in influencer marketing. So tell us about your journey of how you got into this space. What What led you into it?

Tom Augenthaler:

Yeah, I got I got into it, Neil, because of necessity, more than anything else at the time. Think back to like 2000, I was working at HP and I was part of their PR worldwide PR team and I handled consumer notebooks, laptops for the company. So no consumer NAB laptop was announced that I didn't have some kind of hand in. But while there during that time, the economy was tanking and places were going out of business publications are folding. And it created a dilemma because we were losing the number of publications that we could work with. And you know, management didn't care. They just said look, you got to figure out a way in which to get the word out about the product. So I started working with bloggers. And at first it was really kind of wild and wooly, because it's like, Who are these people? And where are they and what are they doing all day and all that good stuff. And I, you know, some of the people I ended up working with are teenagers and we had to get their parents to sign off on then being able to receive a laptop to review and talk about so it was it was kind of fun. It was it was it was a little weird, but from there it really is started to build something because I could see the content coming out was resonating really deeply with the audiences. And much more so than the publications were in many cases, I decided to double down on that.

Neal Schaffer:

So I didn't want to interrupt your story, you're on a flow there. But how could you see working with bloggers? How were you measure? How could you see what was coming out of that at that time?

Tom Augenthaler:

Well, we didn't have the measurement tools that we do today, obviously, but you know, one of the ways to look at it was I was looking at the comments, the comments on the blog posts, and then some of these people, the audience members would actually contact the company and seek out those of us that we're interacting with the bloggers, and the bloggers would say, Well, yeah, go talk to Tom, you know, it'll tell you what a laptop to buy. And for, you know, what, I'm getting emails from people about, hey, what laptop should is this laptop? A good one for me? You know, yeah, I can help you out with that, you know, so it was that way, but also dark social, so or just dark communications, it really wasn't social so much at that point, those those platforms were really just starting out, but it was like, you know, the, the bloggers were telling me about emails they were getting, can you help me with this? You know, I've got questions coming in. And that's how we really were able to measure it.

Neal Schaffer:

But I think and I want you to fast forward, but you are already developing relationships with those bloggers, where in a comment, they could say, hey, ask Tom, I find so many times these days with, you know, brands collaborating with influencers, whether it's b2b or b2c, they're not they don't necessarily have that deep of that relationship, where they're going to be referred where you actually, you know, where the brand has that personal appearance. And I think that also what might have made you really successful with those blogger campaigns was that you were more deeply involved with it where people could reach out to you, right?

Tom Augenthaler:

Yeah, you hit on the hit the nail on the head there with the word relationship. That that was it, I wanted to know these people, I wanted to know these bloggers, I wanted to know who they were who I was dealing with, you know, I was the one signing the contracts with them, I was the one arranging all this with them going back and forth, negotiating whatever, so they knew who I was. And then I use them to other people within hp. So they got to know some of the product managers and things like that. So I was very keen on the idea of the relationship. Because if I got hit by a bus one day, you know somebody else with an HP, I'd be able to pick up the pieces and be able to continue the dialogue. And not only that, but I think I found out that the more I got to know them, the more they trusted me, the more they trusted me the more information they shared. So they would have audience members writing in saying, hey, HP is a great company, they obviously get it quote, unquote. And that was a huge plus, we eventually ran a contest that lasted for 31 days, with 31 bloggers. And we drove sales for a product that had been sitting on the shelves for like six months. And because they didn't put the company hadn't put the right marketing effort behind it. So we picked it up, took it ran with it with the with the bloggers, and they ended up generating all this interest around the product. And and we ended up selling millions of dollars worth of the product. And then not only that, but there's a sales lift for associated laptops. So the company really enjoyed a great, a great little spike there.

Neal Schaffer:

That's a fantastic little case study. I wish I had met you before I wrote the age of influence, because that would have been a perfect addition to that. But let me ask you, Tom, at the point, because you're in PR, I'm assuming you also work with agencies. So you didn't think oh, I'll just have an agency do this for me or agencies had

Tom Augenthaler:

no idea. Okay. And many of them I'm going to tell you today still have no idea. You know, I mean, there are good ones out there. Neil. I think you and I probably know the same people at the same agencies that that get it Yeah, but there are a lot that don't a lot of them we didn't there was no agency in those days that could deal with influencer marketing it was it was all PR firms so and they didn't really no it I mean not to the you're not to bash them because they didn't really know at that point. nobody really knew at that point I just kind of had to take the bull by the horns. And that's awesome. make something happen you know so

Neal Schaffer:

that's back and that's I mean my I started my journey with with social media marketing in 2008 myself so I very much remember the state of that's when bloggers were extremely they were like the youtubers and tick talkers of today back then. So how have things so you started with with bloggers How have things now you know, fastball order, go through the last decade? How have things changed today in terms of who you're reaching out to? And you know, for what?

Tom Augenthaler:

Well, the clients I typically deal with, or our business to business clients that have some kind of technology behind it. So you're no longer working in HP now. So just No, no, no, I left many years ago in 2009. I left I guess, beginning in 2009, something like that. So I have since been either working for a consultancy or on my own. I'm on my own now. And I typically work with b2b companies and these companies are You know, they could be, you know, SAS companies, they could be, you know, pricing they can be, they could be, you know, enterprise hardware, right, I did a lot of work with hp enterprise back in the day, I set up their entire program for them, which still continues to this day, which is kind of cool. But I work with people who have expertise in their space. So it's not really so much about social following, which can matter, depending upon the objective of the campaign, of course, but it's more about expertise and knowledge and street cred. So do the influencers have the chops? as I like to call it? Do they? Do they have that expertise and experience in a given niche where they can really help my client advance? You know, whatever objective we're trying to meet, so maybe they write a lot, maybe they could be bloggers, they could be, they could produce a lot of video, some of them pastors, as well, like yourself? Yeah. So they do all sorts of things. There's a lot of them are webinar hosts, you know, they like to do a lot of webinars because a lot of lead gen activity that's associated with those. So it's really a different bag. But the first thing I look for is, are they experts in their space? Do they really know what they're talking about? And you could tell based upon their track record, where they've worked, where they're working now, and the kind of content they produce.

Neal Schaffer:

So when you work with a client, your first step then is to find out, you're not going like straight to Twitter, looking for people, a lot of followers, obviously, you're doing your best I don't know if part of is like interviewing your client or their customers, but you're trying to figure out who are using a variety of tools, but Javi, who are sort of the go to people in the industry, that people listen to? Is that a great way to?

Tom Augenthaler:

Well, exactly. So the last one of the last clients I worked with, they were interested in three, or three or four different niches, one was the CXO niche. One was pricing, because they were their company that operates there. Another one was sales, but b2b sales. And we're not talking about social selling here, we're talking about b2b sales. And then there were a couple of other one or the other, Nisha, too, so I dealt with the client, I figure out what they really want to achieve, figure out what that objective is. And then we put together a plan a strategy, and then we look for the influencers. So I might start looking on Twitter a bit to see because a lot of those people operate there, you know, they'll have followings there. Some of them are substantial, you know, in terms of numbers, some of them are not so substantial, but they have high, they can have a high impact within the niche, depending upon what they're doing their maybe their book authors, maybe their speakers, maybe they maybe they're, you know, they're speaking a lot at these niche conferences, where the specific audience this specific audience congregates, right, that's powerful, right? Because then you're really narrowing it down, you're really getting into that niche. And you're really finding those people that the client wants to speak to, and the influencers operate there. So just find the right people, you know, and you'll be you'll be off to the races.

Neal Schaffer:

So for those listening, obviously hire Tom, and that's the shortcut to all this. But if you're looking to, you know, just for your own company, try to find out who are who are the influences your industry, what you're really saying, I mean, if if you have influence, whether it's on social media or off social media, you're being talked about, you're showing up and therefore by doing searches by looking at profiles, what are they promoting, by looking at Amazon Apple podcasts, doing webinars, searches, what have you, you're gonna find people that are that are out there, their content creating, they are, you know, speaking at conferences, doing what and and then you begin to compile this list, I'm assuming, and you begin to have that people in terms of their expertise or relevance, I guess, the next stages. So obviously, we call this you know, influence identification. So you find like, let's say 100 people, I don't know what niche b2b Industries might be way smaller. But what do you do next? Because not everybody wants to work with you. Not everybody wants to do the things you want them to do? So and I'm assuming for every client is going to be different, obviously. But what are some advice you can give the listener that has gone through this? Well, you know, where do they go from there?

Tom Augenthaler:

Yeah, great, great question. You know, the way I approach it, and the way it works for me, and has always worked, is that I reach out to the influencer, I explain who I am, who I'm working with, and what I'd like to do. And I typically, because it's the b2b space, I can get on a zoom call with them for 20 minutes or half an hour. And I you know, we just introduced each other and I say, Hey, this is what I'm working for right now. And we're really looking at you, you have an interesting audience, you have your squarely in within this niche that we're we're looking to, to develop relationships within. So are you open to that? And then I asked, Well, how do you like to work with brands? You know, some will say, Well, I like to do it this way. And others are like, Well, you know, you've got to pay me others. We're open to doing some earned content first kind of get to know each other. And then and then it goes on from there. So that's the way I approach it. Yes, build the list vet the influences really carefully. And there's a variety of tools which you can use to do that. I always check for fake followers. I always check for mass followers, things like that. And if they if they sussed out, okay, well, then I did I make that introduction.

Neal Schaffer:

So you, when you reach out to them, you're both saying, this is, this is what we'd like to do together. But you're also saying, Give because obviously, you have a specific objective that your clients want to do. But you're also saying, hey, how do you normally work with clients? This is what we want to do. But what are the ways in which you can in which we can begin to collaborate? Basically,

Tom Augenthaler:

exactly. It's about collaboration. So I don't typical to it. Assuming that there's only one or two types of activities that are acceptable, I educated the client understand that we have to work with each individual influencer, and work within the norms that they're used to. So the influencer has a podcast and they like to do some writing and blog posts, maybe some guests article somewhere, you know, sponsored articles, things like that. Okay, great. You know, another influencer might be different. They might say, hey, look, I've got a video podcast, I'd like to interview people on, you know, this is my audience. This is how I like to do it. No, say okay, great. Well, so it's, it's very much about working with the influencer on a collaborative basis, so that everybody wins. Because if if it's done that way, then the content that gets created is generally better quality. And it really does resonate with the audience a lot better. So I don't take the approach of the brand telling the influencer what to do. I know that a lot of times in the consumer space that can happen in the b2b space, you're not going to get away with that very easily. Let's put it that way. Yeah.

Neal Schaffer:

Yeah. And Tom, it's funny because my background is also b2b in technology. I worked in semiconductor embedded software, network management software, but you speak the same language I speak and, and probably my view on influence marketing also comes from and I my role was mainly b2b sales, but it's all relationships ecosystem. And I see the common DNA we have in the approach. So it's really refreshing to find someone with a similar approach. And I, I talk a lot about that in the age of influence. But yeah, I guess it's a conversation I have with Jay Baer, about b2b influencer marketing. And I guess, in b2c, it depends on the type of product you have. But there's a lot of potential people you can work with. But when you talk about, like data recovery, it, you know, artificial intelligence, for data recovery hardware solutions, there aren't that many people out there that are speaking. So therefore, every person that you engage with, you will need to make sure you don't burn any bridges, right, because that just maybe 10% of potential influences to work with. And have you worked in like, really, really niche industries like that, where there's just oh, no, so many people? Yeah.

Tom Augenthaler:

Oh, yeah. But it's about building a mosaic. So you build sort of a picture. It's not just about finding those specific people within that specific niche, although that is the core of it. Right? You certainly begin there, and then you radiate out a little bit. So people like your, to your example, a specific niche, right, data recovery, Ai, you know, involving hardware, well, then you could start to talk to some big data, guys or gals, right, you can start to talk to some artificial intelligence experts, right, and see where there's a sort of marriage there, right, where, you know, it's they sort of overlap, and you sort of build a mosaic a picture together, and you get all these different perspectives to it, which is also great. And that's something that company should be open to hearing, they should want to hear. What are the influencers? Hearing? What is their perception on this? Because you could take that back, and you can really use that knowledge to your advantage if you're if you're wise.

Neal Schaffer:

So you actually have the opportunity to educate influencers at those intersection points via AI people with the big data people, I guess, from that perspective, there's no lack of people, assuming the technology is built on something, there's obviously going to be a broader audience of people to talk about that. And yeah, that's great. So the next step then is and I'm sure you've seen this companies hire you at the beginning. It's all the ROI question. They buy into it, they work for it, how do you then it because inevitably, every influencer works differently. And therefore ROI is going to be measured slightly differently based on on what happened? So is it more of a PR approach that says, hey, we are doing these collaborative things with these influences on this cadence? And it's having this much impact? Or is it more of pure lead? Gen, you know, website clicks, what have you or a combination?

Tom Augenthaler:

Well, it could be any or all of the above. However, if you're going to start out, have a clear objective. So if it's about driving awareness, then that's what the key Pain is going to be about. You can't go through midway through the campaign and then start, I start asking, Well, wait a minute, where's all of our lead gen here? Well wait, hold on a second, we weren't looking for lead gen, we're looking to drive awareness, we're looking to nudge the competitors aside and take over this conversation, right, we're trying to increase your share of voice, we're trying to increase the number of people out there that are going to want to listen to you, because you're showing some sort of expertise, here, you're showing some sort of knowledge you're giving value, you know, and that way, you're nudging the competitors aside. So if you're going with the objective of driving awareness, it's you're gonna have to measure according to that. You can't switch midstream. I've seen that happen before and everybody gets frustrated. The executive will say, Well, wait a minute, how come? You know, how come that we're on to the website? Well, we weren't looking for that, sir. You know,

Neal Schaffer:

my favorite is, Why isn't anyone using the hashtag? It's like, Well, that wasn't part of the campaign. We didn't.

Tom Augenthaler:

We didn't come up with a hashtag. It wasn't that kind of a campaign. So make sure that everybody understands the objectives up front, and then the and then and then and then look, and then decide which measurements which metrics are gonna matter, to measuring that success. I mean, it might be that the company has done nothing with influencers for ever, right? And this is completely new. So the education curve is gonna be really high. Right? And it's gonna take a while to get some of those executives on board to participate as guests and podcasts or video interviews or other things that can come up. So, but once they get a taste of it, I find that starts to click. It's like, Oh, yeah, okay, you know, I get this now I've got an influencer, I work with his name is Eric Cavanaugh. He's got a radio program. And he talks about, you know, high level topics in the technology industry, but he reaches a lot of the CXO, or senior management with his radio program. As he asserts 25 markets around the country, it takes about a million listeners per episode. So one of the things I usually do is get some of my executives onto that program, and they get a taste for Oh, wow, you know, Eric was really fun. And that was a great episode. And then you can also educate the book. Look, that was a great episode. Let's do this. Let's take that content. And let's slice it, dice it. And let's use it for our own marketing efforts. Right? Let's insert some of these these pull quotes into the email campaigns, let's do some internal communications with the employees. Let's let them know what's going on here. Let's let them start to tune in to Eric's radio program. And let's follow him on social media. So try to help the influencer as much as possible to but the content once it's created, as you know, it doesn't just sit there on its own. You got to do something with it. Right. Yeah. And that's, that's where a lot of the juice is at.

Neal Schaffer:

Yeah, I think I mean, with b2c as well, but especially with b2b, there's so much value in that, because it's you're talking to experts, right? So it's really a no brainer. So that's really awesome. Advice. Tom, I'm curious, you mentioned that use a lot of tools. So are there any, I'm a big fan that says, hey, you know, if they're really known in their industry, you should be able to do just rudimentary searches. And they should pop up, right? If you know what to search for, obviously, right? So therefore, you don't necessarily need to have tools. Now. You mentioned tools like to vet fake followers. So I know with certain networks, those tools exist with others, it's sort of hard to hard to find, but are there any, like a must have tool? Like, I guess buzzsumo is for a lot of b2b marketers, like a must have tool, right. And they do have the ability to like, look for Twitter influencers? What have you, are there any other like, must have tools like that, that you'd recommend? Or is it just a combination of just critical thinking, but, you know, looking at the numbers and the profiles, what have you,

Tom Augenthaler:

I typically do a few different things. I buzzsumo. Great tool, like you mentioned, that's that's sort of a no brainer. The Gold Standard? Yeah, yeah, it's gold standard there. Yeah. And you could tell a lot by looking at that tool, you could see where the contents resonating, what kind of content is resonating, all those good things,

Neal Schaffer:

and they've developed the new help you find journalists in social media functionality. So if you haven't, if you've haven't used buzzsumo in the last year, they've really developed a lot of rich functionality just wanted to give them a shout out. Yeah,

Tom Augenthaler:

yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. Totally agree. I also use some other tools too like Social Blade I'll use that because a lot of the a lot of b2b influencers, you know, they're on Twitter, you know, some are on Instagram, right? I get to look at the follower trends. Yeah, I'm looking at I'm looking at how they you know, how they built their followings? You know, I see big spikes. I'm gonna be like, Huh, we're gonna investigate that a little more closely. It could be legit, could be legit. But we took a close look. I also look I use hype auditor to it's another tool I kind of really like and there's another one Twitter audit, just for a quick look at Twitter followers just for fake followers. If there's a high number of fake followers, I doubled jack, I don't just assume Twitter audit is going to give you the exact, you know, the exact number there anything but it's a, it's a pretty good. It's a pretty good I think it's fair to surmise Neal that if somebody is buying fake followers on Twitter, they're probably buying fake followers on some of their other social accounts or channels to share. And then and then I go to LinkedIn, I spend a lot of time on LinkedIn. Right? And then Google, I will Google their name. And I, I see where they, you know, I just look to see where they're mentioned, I look, are they are they getting mentioned in lists, things like that. And then there's one last tool that I'll mention, is Analytica, which is a an influencer marketing platform for, for b2b, it's, it's quite good. I enjoy it. And I found a lot of value there to

Neal Schaffer:

give a shout out to Tim Williams and that wonderful team there in London, but from a business model perspective on politica, though, that's more, I guess they do have those top lists. But that's more of like an enterprise tool, correct. For it's more of an enterprise tool. Yes. If you're a smaller b2b, it might not be that helpful for you.

Tom Augenthaler:

Yeah. But you could still check out their lists. Yeah, they publish a lot of great content. And that could be a great starting point and jump off point to help you find other people in Twitter audit, just to go back to my notes like a $99 a month, what have you, they have a limited, you know, an entry. But if you're serious, it's a small investment to make the Twitter audit that's like, it's free, like once every 10 minutes, you can do a search like that. Yeah, there is a there is a paid version, too. There is a paid version, and you can get much more complete reports. Got, but typically, I just use the free version, because I'm just using some real quick, just, you know, check their check their Twitter following and see whether it looks legit or not.

Neal Schaffer:

And then the hypeauditor Yeah, I've actually talked, they actually were in when I did a pre sales campaign for my book. They were they actually like, bought it, and I was in touch with them. And they have a really great product. I think, you know, beginning with Instagram, and I know they're now brands not in other networks, but that's like a $50 month $100 month. I'm like, yeah, idea.

Tom Augenthaler:

Yeah, it's not very expensive. And you can download a little PDF report on each influencer, that you've decided to check out, which is kind of nice, because then you can have a nice little PDF, and you can you can keep that. And that's good for a decent period of time. You know? Yeah.

Neal Schaffer:

Oh, it's also great briefs to give clients too, I'm sure. Yes, exactly. People. Yeah. Well, Tom, this has been really great. I know everyone listening has gotten a lot out of this, you've been very generous with sharing a lot of your advice and tips and tools. Is there any sort of last words anything that we missed that you want to make sure everybody listening knows? Well, I

Tom Augenthaler:

just say that with on the b2b side of the fence, it's much more about a strategic vision, I you know, on the consumer side, you can kind of grab a bunch of influencers pretty quickly get them to post your content, or whatever it is, you know, to some landing page or something, you know, okay, that's great. And, and that that can really work, it can work, but on the b2b side, you got to think it through a little bit more. So really take a careful look at what objectives are you really trying to meet here. And the second thing is, is once you start to work with some of the influencers, think in terms of building relationships with those people, because they can be people that you work with for years. I mean, some of the people I introduced to HP, they're still working with you 10 years later. So there's, there's lots of benefit to be had there. And one more thing, some of the best influencers you will find, will be referred you to the influencers, you know, so if you're looking for people in a niche, and you're having a little bit of difficulty, ask a couple of influencers that you know, and they'll put out, you know, they'll give you some suggestions or they will find some people for you.

Neal Schaffer:

That's awesome advice. You never know, you know, who you know who you met 10 years ago, for those of you listening, you should know that I have a second podcast I recently launched called the School of influence and I think it was like the second episode, we had Jesse Itzler, and he was in his 20s and he created like music so he created like the song that the New York Knicks used, and he talks about in the interview in his 20s You know, he had to work with some guy named David Stern to get that to deal with the music licensing issues what have you and and David Stern was was a newbie in the NBA at the time. And then 30 years later, you know, he becomes Jesse becomes an investor in the Atlanta Hawks and in order to get approval, he had to contact his old friend David Stern, who is that you never end the message there is you never know where people go and I've just over the last 10 years I'm sure you've seen bloggers that have become legit like you know YouTube channels or their authors and it's it's amazing if you maintain those relationships that you know you're not in it for that that ROI but just people especially if they're influential now think five years from now where they might be so Zack what advice yeah all right Tom. So let's let's do so where can they find out more about you and how you help businesses? Sure, they

Tom Augenthaler:

can find me at my website the influence marketer calm and that's marketer not not that influencer marketer and then you can find me on LinkedIn I'm on LinkedIn all the time. So it's t og and Fowler t as in Tom. Last name, you can find me there. And then I helped. I can help consumer businesses too. But I, my real passion is for the b2b segment. So that's, that's where my, that's where my real interest lies. So if you've got any interest in developing a program, getting something going, you want some general advice, hit me up, I'd be more than happy to help you out.

Neal Schaffer:

That's awesome. Thank you so much, Tom. And we'll put all that in the show notes. But hey, thank you so much for for being on today. It was really, you know, information packed advice packed episode. Appreciate you. And everybody, please make sure if you have any questions, reach out to Tom, and we will see you all in the next episode. All right. I hope you enjoyed that episode as much as I did. And it just brings so many great reminders about the power of influencer marketing. And hopefully, for those of you that read the age of influence, you're already implementing my suggestions. And if you haven't read it, or you're a little late and implementing, hopefully, Tom gave you a lot of great advice on how you can move forward. As always, I like to give a shout out to all of you listening, a special shout out this week to Christoph trap. Now, Christoph was actually one of my guests. For those of you that remember, it was back in Episode Number 204. going live why live streaming matters cristoforo great conversation. Neil doesn't just ask questions, but it's a fantastic conversation with his guests and shares his own experiences just like his guests. Do check it out. Christoph, thank you so much for the review. Obviously, every review is extremely appreciated. So make sure if you write a review that you reach out to me as well take a screenshot. And I would like to invite you to my monthly group coaching calls only for my podcast reviewers. I also want to think I've seen over the last week, this podcast shoot up in the rankings in a lot of really, really strategic countries such as the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, I also see France, Spain, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, Portugal, Finland, Slovakia, Croatia, Luxembourg, Belarus, Moldova, I want to personally thank you all for listening. And for your subscriptions. This podcast wouldn't exist without you. And you know what? If it's like, Neil, why don't you talk about this? or Why don't you talk about that. Let me know this podcast really exists to serve you. So if there's something you want me to cover to hear from you, you can include that in review, or you can just reach out to me. Obviously, you can go to my website, contact me. I'm Neal Schaffer everywhere. It's also an obviously Neal Schaffer calm as well. Well, that's it for another episode of The maximize your social influence podcast. Make sure you hit that subscribe button so that you don't miss any of my future episodes. And I look forward to continuing the conversation with you next week. Until then, make it a great social day. Bye bye everybody, and SEO nada.