The UnNoticed Entrepreneur - how to overcome being overlooked.

Here are 30 free content ideas for your public relations program which you can use now.

June 29, 2021 Jim James
The UnNoticed Entrepreneur - how to overcome being overlooked.
Here are 30 free content ideas for your public relations program which you can use now.
Chapters
The UnNoticed Entrepreneur - how to overcome being overlooked.
Here are 30 free content ideas for your public relations program which you can use now.
Jun 29, 2021
Jim James

Most entrepreneurs get stuck when thinking about what to say about their business. In this episode of The UnNoticed Show I am going to share 6 different categories of your business to look at for pr content, and drill down to find 5 items per category. These are the basis for ideation for your content strategy. 

I mention videoask.com, gathervoices.com, canva.com, visme.com

If you want to know how to get noticed this show is for you. I have interviews, tools, tips, everything that an entrepreneur could need in order to help their organization to get noticed for free. Thank you for joining me on the unnoticed show.

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Start for FREE

Please rate the show here.

Thank you for listening to this episode of the unnoticed to show. I hope that you've enjoyed. If you have, please do rate it on any of the players. If you'd like more information, go over to EASTWEST PR and subscribe to our weekly newsletter. Or connect with me on Linkedin that's just Jim James.  I'd be delighted to connect with you and let me know how i can help you to get noticed.


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Show Notes Transcript

Most entrepreneurs get stuck when thinking about what to say about their business. In this episode of The UnNoticed Show I am going to share 6 different categories of your business to look at for pr content, and drill down to find 5 items per category. These are the basis for ideation for your content strategy. 

I mention videoask.com, gathervoices.com, canva.com, visme.com

If you want to know how to get noticed this show is for you. I have interviews, tools, tips, everything that an entrepreneur could need in order to help their organization to get noticed for free. Thank you for joining me on the unnoticed show.

Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched!
Start for FREE

Please rate the show here.

Thank you for listening to this episode of the unnoticed to show. I hope that you've enjoyed. If you have, please do rate it on any of the players. If you'd like more information, go over to EASTWEST PR and subscribe to our weekly newsletter. Or connect with me on Linkedin that's just Jim James.  I'd be delighted to connect with you and let me know how i can help you to get noticed.


Email Signatures Full of Brand Promise
Create Branded Email Signatures for All Employees in Few Minutes.

Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched!
Start for FREE

Disclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.

Support the show (https://lovethepodcast.com/Unnoticed)

Jim James:

Hello, and welcome to this episode of the UnNoticed Show if you are struggling for content. Things to say, to write and to publish about you and your company and what you're doing then this episode, I think, is going to be excellent for you because I'm going to list. Six different areas that you can look where you can find content, low hanging fruit.

Content that isn't going to be difficult to find or create, and is going to be great to build your brand. I'm going to read for you the first six, and then I'm going to come back. Into each of those and dive down. Now the goal is to find for you content that you can publish. Every week, if not every day. That appeals to your three different audience groups, your customers. Your partners and also to your staff. Now let's just have a look. I've got company news. I've got industry news. I've got product news. I've got customer news, I've got partner news and I've got people news. There's lots of news. Let's find which news is going to work for you. Now, first of all, let's look at the company now. I've broken these down into these different aspects of what could be considered the company. To give you an idea of the depth of detail that you can go to. Now, first of all, under company, have you talked before about the history? Of your business. Have you talked about. When it was started, why it was started. Who started it, if it wasn't, you. What. Photographs. Have you got, what images have you got of the business? As it was going to be started, or even before you started it. I sent out a press release. Of me. jumping out of an airplane. At the age of 18 saying that. Jumping out of an airplane. Taught me that the rest of my career would be in public relations. So I even proceeded by some 10 years. My start in the PR firm using a photograph of me jumping in and out of an airplane. So what do you have for your company? That's history? What milestones has your company attained? These don't have to be long ones. They could be small ones. It's all relative. Maybe it's something relatively smaller, first invention or a first customer or a second or a third, or growing the business by a certain percentage. What milestones can you create or celebrate? For your company. Location is your business in a particularly interesting location? Is it. In a disused factory that used to have an interesting story. Is it. In a building that's been repurposed. Is it a home? Is it that you don't have an office that you work at your clients? Office. Is it that you happen to work from a mobile space? How does location. Anchor your business. How can that be a story? That creates a context. That potential customers. Partners and employees. Can think and affiliate with your business. Now let's look at location. Is there any historical resonance to the location? And the business you're doing now. Are you working for example, in a place that has a particular history? With your industry. For example, obviously people took about coming from Silicon valley or in the Ribble valley in the Northeast. Of England. It's actually the home for digital audio technology in the world. what does your location. Have that grounds your business that creates a narrative about why your business is there, are you in the location that you're in now? Just because you happen to arrive there or. Is there some history. Is there some significance, is there an infrastructure there of existing companies, for example, or maybe there was an innovation that took place or maybe this is where the minerals came from. So what story can your location give your business? What about the building? Are you working from a historical building? Are you working out of no building at all? What does your building say? About you and your company, or what are you building? Maybe you're building, for example, a restaurant or a factory. What does that say? Secondly, let's look at the people in your organization. Now how often do we overlook the stories of our people and yet. Most companies say, our people are our asset. And yet they do remarkably little to reward those people, or certainly to highlight those people. Often the head of sales might go for a speaking engagements. For example, the CEO often prefers to be the only spokesperson. But what can we do to highlight the people? In our business. And you see this, particularly with charities are actually very good at doing this as are. Groups like the protection for children or the animal welfare. They show people at the frontline, always NHS care workers, for example. What awards have your people won and it doesn't have to be a work award. It could be that there are. maybe they've done a duke of Edinburgh. Scheme or maybe they've helped their children with that. Maybe they've run a particular marathon or they've raised money for charity. Who knows what it is. Maybe they've entered a cooking contest. So what stories do your staff have awards? What recreational activities do they take part in? Quite often people that work together actually play together. Are there examples of your people going out, for example, in a group cycling or a group, mountain biking. Or a group social event watching the football together. What kind of service? Do those people have for your business? Do you celebrate long service? Awards for your staff. Do they have particular ways of rewarding? One another. For example, do they buy cakes for each other? So the people in your business. Are a rich source of stories. We mustn't be afraid of using the stories within the business because these people are by and large, the people that are giving in contact with the customers and the suppliers and the partners. So how can we create a personality? Around the business, which is about the people that are in next let's look at the product or service that you're offering. Now there's a whole raft here. And most people think of public relations as product or product marketing. They think of corporate branding. The company may be investor relations and I think maybe a product and product marketing. But so often. pr around is all about. What's just been launched and it misses. A lot of the context, a lot of the rich heritage that underlines and underlies why this product or service exists today. So let's just look at those. For example, what's the design. Of this product or service. Or venue, for example, where did that design come from? What's the design philosophy for this. Now, when I worked at Lotus as the CEO in China. We talked a lot about how the Lotus design and Colin Chapman, who was the founder of Lotus. Was all about. Keeping the weight down in the vehicle. He said "power is not the important point. It's the weight". And it's the weight to power ratio. That's important. So the design philosophy of Colin Chapman is in the DNA of the business. And in China. It was part of the narrative. That we built in the public relations. What technology is embedded into the product. But not just what technology is there for the sake of creating the product. But also for the backstory of the technology. For example, if you're in data. What's the path, for example, to now five G I'm working with a client on 5g. And in order to explain 5g, we have to explain 4g and 3g, and we even have to go back to the basis of CDMA TDMA and the G S M a. I won't bore you with all the acronyms, but there's a history there to the technology. And the products today only exists because of their heritage. The technology path. What can you do to explain how your product or service. Lies on that chronology of technology. What about any patents that you've got for your product or service? Or trademarks, for example. The very process of filing a patent and a trademark actually could be news that you filed for it. What you've had to do to get that trademark, how much it costs. What it covers. This can also be a thought leadership piece. For somebody else that might be interested and it could be one of your members of staff. It could be a partner. It could be a potential customer who really wants to work with a company that has patents but it hasn't read about the, because it's not on the product itself. What about the science? the thinking. Behind the product, this is different to the technology, the science behind it. So for example, I've been looking at the unnoticed show and writing a book. About why people want to get noticed and it's to do with Thymōs. Which is the. the Greek. the Greek origin word. About the need for recognition. And about how as individuals. And as organizations. We need to be recognized and we need to be recognized. In some senses as peers, but also in other senses is better than our peers. It's a basic instinct. But it underlies why people want to get noticed why public relations and advertising all marketing happens. Of course from a commercial point of view. We need public relations in order to get noticed. But actually that's just a commercial manifestation of our personal requirement, which is to be able to find food and to be part of a tribe and to be taken care of. what is the science behind your product or service? And perhaps my favorite one making an, if anyone's watched the children, watching YouTube. My girls love to watch science. Movies. They love to watch chemistry, how things. Get made. they said to me, dad watching chemistry is like watching magic. Add this chemical solution to this chemical solution. I'm working with another client. In the manufacturing space and they can make a design. Into a 3d prototype in 72 hours. It's a combination of CAD is a combination of plastic injection molding. It's a combination of heat lamps. It's amazing. It's great content. How something is made. Everybody loves to be enthralled because ultimately we're all curious. How are you making your product? Is it an individual doing coding in Bangalore. Is it a person grinding, some boundaries somewhere, or somebody fashioning something or making from textiles? How is your product or service being made? That is a story. That one lends itself very well. To photographs and videos. And audio now, finally, on the product. Applications. What are the applications for your service? Everybody. That I know has in mind what they think their customers are doing with their product. But often there are other applications that they may or may not be aware of or that they may or may not have really exploited. I'm always a big fan of the old story of Brill cream. Which came up at my postgraduate marketing degree. In Manchester and the professor raised. Nigeria and barrel cream as a great application case study. Brill cream for those of you that don't know. The story will unfold. I won't tell exactly what it is until you've heard the case study. Because it'll spoil it. But the sales team. At Brill cream found that. A growth market was Nigeria a little bit unexpected, of course, in west Africa that Brill cream would be a growth sales product for them. So they sent the sales team. Down to Nigeria and on the way in, from the airport at Lagos. They were quite surprised to see the billboards put up by the local distributor. Advertising Brill cream. People smiling. And spreading it. On their dry bread. And putting it with de yam. They were surprised because as brill creamcream, Is a hydrogenated oil for your hair. To keep it down to keep it flat. So that originally thought. That people are using bro cream. To relax. There Afro hair, but actually in Nigeria, the application. Was for food. So not suggesting that you want to have products that are really cosmetics being used for food, but what applications. Can you think of that your product is being used for that renders itself for social media and PR. Now let's just look at the last two groups you've got customers and partners. Now customers often do not feature. In the PR of. Certainly B to B companies and often not enough. For consumer companies. So here's some ideas for you. What are the stories? About how your customers first came to get to know about your company. Can you ask them, Hey, how did you find out about us? What kind of snippet, can you use a tool like video, ask? For example. To gather up. Data, of course. We have the Other platform called gather voices, which is really good for this. You have all the stories happening now on FIFO or on Trustpilot. Where people will write reviews. Those reviews could be stories. All those reviews could be retweeted. For example, it could be made into a montage. Or into an infographic. Now, what about recommendations that these customers could give you? Could you offer customers a. A bonus, a reward, a rebate, a cash over a cash off the next purchase. For giving recommendations, where they actually appear in the social media where they're willing to be interviewed, for example, How do they use the product? Thinking about, for example, people. That are buying and driving caravans. I'm only thinking of that because I've got my caravan club membership renewed, and I've just got a picture of people in the caravan site, but they're stock models. Now, what about if the caravan club just had regular members posting their pictures? And what about the engagement, how lives were changed as a result of using your product or service? Could you get customers to tell you. Now most people are afraid of asking customers. Because they think that the customer. A might say, actually it's not as good as I thought it was. I want to have a word with you. So there's avoidance or they're afraid the customer will say I'd like a discount please, because you're using me. Now if it's the first one, we've got a bigger problem, because as I've covered before we social media, those customers, who've got other places to say that they're unhappy and they might as well come and tell you. But if you're worried about giving them a discount or a rebate, I would say. The monetary value of having a customer, engaging with its audience and becoming what I call an evangelist on your behalf. Is absolutely golden. You can't even quantify that. And as we know from apple, for example, every customer that's engaged with the brand and becomes an evangelist for your brand. Is doing your work for you? Now the final group. Are your partners. And I put partners in here because most people think of PR. As being just about the company. But I'd like to think about what can your partners share? And what can you say about the company that you keep in order to deliver the products and services to your customers? What awards have they got? What supply chain quality do they have? What leadership do they have? What interviews can you have with your partners? Can you do things together? Joint photograph, for example, give each other a certificate of some kind, get your teams together to celebrate. That you work together. Because for the customer, seeing that there's a team. Supplying them is reassuring. And also don't forget the partner has its own social network. And they're likely then to promote what you put out within their social network. Finally, let's just look at the industry. Industry's rich. With commentary. There are trends. There are insights there's analysis. This whole areas of conversation around regulations. Think of the impact of Brexit or COVID. Or these can be opinion articles. They can be videos that you give. They could be webinars that you host. The industry where you operate. Is rich as a source of content. If you just think about your position about any of the topics that are taking place at the moment within your industry. This will give you an idea of some of the ways that you could format it. Now, as I said, some of this content, if it's worthy, could be a press release. Some of it could be for your LinkedIn, a short 500 word article. Some could be a video. That you could make, some of it could be an infographic using vis me or canva.com. Some of it could just be a tweet or a text. So I've created, therefore you some content. Ideas company people. Product customer partner and industry. Can you break that down more? Yes, you can. Could you break it down less? Yes, you can have. Not giving you the exhaustive list, but I am just trying to give you a list. To get you started. And once you work through this, I think you'll find content comes freely and easily to you. And I'll post this my map. On my LinkedIn. So that if you need it, you can get it. And I'll also attach it to my show notes. Thank you so much for listening to this episode of the unnoticed show.