Muscle Talk - By International Protein

Routines, A Recipe for Success

March 03, 2021 International Protein Season 3 Episode 8
Muscle Talk - By International Protein
Routines, A Recipe for Success
Chapters
Muscle Talk - By International Protein
Routines, A Recipe for Success
Mar 03, 2021 Season 3 Episode 8
International Protein

In this episode, we discuss how routine really is the recipe for success.

  • Gym routine
  • Programs
  • Pre-workout Programs
  • Sleep routines
  • Food, being the most important routine of all


If you want your own questions answered on our podcast, then join our private Facebook group and share your ideas, https://www.facebook.com/groups/muscletalk

If you'd like to learn more about International Protein, visit https://www.international-protein.com/






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A Thinkroom production - www.thinkroom.com

Show Notes Transcript

In this episode, we discuss how routine really is the recipe for success.

  • Gym routine
  • Programs
  • Pre-workout Programs
  • Sleep routines
  • Food, being the most important routine of all


If you want your own questions answered on our podcast, then join our private Facebook group and share your ideas, https://www.facebook.com/groups/muscletalk

If you'd like to learn more about International Protein, visit https://www.international-protein.com/






------------------------------------------------------
A Thinkroom production - www.thinkroom.com

Ash Horton:
Welcome to Muscle Talk where you'll get world champion advice about nutrition and stacking on muscle. Our host, Christine Envall, she's a three-time world champion bodybuilder and IFBB professional, a food scientist, and a founding co-owner of our podcast sponsor, International Protein. In this episode, we discuss how routine really is the recipe for success. We talk about gym routines, programs, pre-workout routines, sleep routines, and food being the most important routine of all. All right, Christine, today we'd like to talk about routine. In previous podcasts, we've talked about bedtime routine. We've talked about how you had a routine of you always did legs on the weekend, for example, because you just had the time to do so. But let's talk about the importance of it and what are the other areas because that sort of coincides with discipline, but elaborate.

Christine Envall:
Okay. Well, to me, there's like macro routine, which I guess is your full day routine and what you do throughout the day, but then there's all the little sub-routines, like your program, whether it's your cardio routine or your weights routine, even your food routine. So, really, what I want to talk about is the importance of those things for success and for progress and for tracking progress. And one of the things that I see where people maybe don't get the results that they want is because either they're not tracking something, which if you're not tracking and measuring, how do you know whether you've gotten a result. You may actually have got the result and just not realized it, but also that consistency and progress, and that most of it does actually come down to having some type of stable routine.

Christine Envall:
There are a few people who are, I guess, very genetically gifted or just natural freaks or unicorns, I guess, as people call them, who randomly do things. But I guess, I was reading the Tools of the Titans, which is a book where Tim Ferriss interviews a whole bunch of really, really successful people, and I think one of the things he said was that 80% of those people who are really successful all had some type of routine. So, it's a real common theme where to get success and achieve goals, and whether it be work or training, but obviously, here we're talking about bodybuilding and we're talking about training, you need to have some kind of routine. You can't just kind of wake up in the morning and decide, oh, I'm going to go train, but not know what you're going to train or not know what you're going to train when you get to gym.

Ash Horton:
So, you shouldn't turn up to the gym not knowing what you're going to train.

Christine Envall:
Exactly. I'm sure some people do, and I know some people say, "Well, it's really hard because the equipment might be busy," or that kind of thing, but you need to have... Well, what I find is that you end up wasting a lot of time if you don't have some idea of what it is that you want to do because you actually kind of sit there pondering and procrastinating, and then maybe you do miss the piece of equipment, or maybe you do this essentially one exercise or three different exercises which are working the same part. Like you might do a dumbbell press and then a flat barbell press, but you're basically doing the same exercise instead of doing say an incline version or a decline version or something that works from a different angle.

Christine Envall:
But I know particularly when we were going through COVID, before a lot of the online stuff started and in that kind of that period where I knew I wanted to do some cardio, if I didn't write down what exercises I was going to do, I found the intensity really dropped away. I'd kind of do an exercise of, oh, what am I going to do next? And even though it might only be that minute, it's that minute that really changes the intensity of that cardio session, and really takes-

Ash Horton:
It's even probably the mentality of it too, isn't it?

Christine Envall:
Yeah, the mentality of staying in the intensity. I find if I know in advance what's going to happen and I can just kind of walk in and boom, boom, boom, boom, boom, go, bang, go through each exercise because I know what I need to do, and then also that comes back to obviously having tracked or recorded what it is that I'm supposed to be starting on so I'm not kind of fluffing around thinking, "Was it 40 kilos or was it 60 or what did I do last time?" You know for that exercise this is what I do. I know how many sets I want to do. I know what my target and what my goal is so it's-

Ash Horton:
So, have you got like a program, you keep it on your phone, you can just open it up and refer to it? How does it [crosstalk 00:04:25]?

Christine Envall:
Because I've been doing it for so long, the program is in my head, literally. But my first four years of training, I physically had a book.

Ash Horton:
Like a little notebook and a pencil.

Christine Envall:
Yes, a little notebook and people that I've worked with will carry the same kind of thing, either in their phone, put it in their notes or in a physical book and actually write it down, sets and reps and weight on a particular set. So, depends how familiar you are with your program. Like I said, I've been doing it so long, and if you're at the same gym all the time, you know if you're always starting on this weight on this particular exercise, but if you're new to it or you're in that in-between phase then, by all means, you really should be recording so you know where you're going back to so you're not, again, wasting time trying to remember. You might do three sets before you figure out, oh, this was actually really light and I needed to be going heavier.

Christine Envall:
So it's all about, I guess, efficiency, not doing too much, not doing too little, and doing the right amount. So, I guess I going to kind of focus since we talked about that on a program for a workout. So, we will talk about the structure of a day and that type of thing. But when it comes to having a routine, it starts off where with your weight training programming, you really need to look at realistically how many days a week are you going to train, and then within that, which days of the week are you going to train. Because if you're saying, "Oh, I'm going to train six days a week, I'm going to do this," but the reality is you know that on a Tuesday, you're always late at work and you're never going to get to the gym, or you're not going to have the amount of time, then maybe you need to make that your day off, or you might have longer workouts that you got to work out, okay, Saturday and Sunday, I might want to do these particular body parts because I need more time or you might be really, really social and you don't even want to be in the gym on a Saturday.

Christine Envall:
So, you have to be realistic about basically your life, your goals, and where you're spending your time so when you set up your routine, you're setting up something that you'll succeed at rather than being unrealistic and picking something and then knowing that when you actually look back, instead of training six days a week, you really only trained three because of all these other things that have come up. So, I think number one is kind of being realistic about what you can actually do within your commitments, or if you're going to make that your priority, and you're always going to be at the gym at that particular time. Come hell or high water, you're going to be in there at that time.

Christine Envall:
So, that's the first thing is working out how many days a week you can commit to it, and then how you're going to structure that training. So, some people might want to do all of their body once in one week. Some people might want to do every body part twice in one week. Some people might want to stretch it over 10 days. So, again, within that, you then need to kind of break down that next structure and then go down to that micro-level of what exercises are you going to do on that day, so that when you walk into gym, all you have to think about is doing those exercises. You're not having to think about, "Oh, I've got chest and what did I do last week, and am I doing this?" And having that moment of, again, to me, it's just time-wasting. You're not getting the most out of that actual workout.

Ash Horton:
Do you need to sort of build in some predetermined kind of flexibility into it? So, for example, if I normally train on a Wednesday, but for whatever reason, I just can't get there or I'm super fatigued or whatever it is, I just don't train. How does that work?

Christine Envall:
Again, I do build in that flexibility, and this is why I'm sort of saying you might want to train five days or six days, I'm never training seven, there is always at least one or two rest days in there that you can manipulate around. So, okay, say you normally train on a Wednesday, but you take Tuesday off, and you have a meeting that you know is going to go late on Wednesday, I guess you decide whether you pull that day forward or push that day back, or if you're going to just absolutely skip that day altogether and just move along as if it never happened, which is basically your two choices.

Christine Envall:
And there isn't necessarily a right or a wrong, depending on are you prepping for a comp, mentally how do you deal with that. If I'm away somewhere and I normally do legs on a Saturday, I don't try to catch that legs day up. I normally just say, "Okay, that was gone, next week is legs again," because in the whole continuum of where I'm at, it doesn't really matter. But if someone has a comp, they might decide to catch that day up and not miss that legs day, or they might prefer to miss a different body part.

Christine Envall:
So, again, that is going to be down to you, but the decisions that you need to make, and you probably need to make them early enough if you know something's coming up. If something's last minute, then again, you would make that decision, am I just going to let that one go and keep on with my routine as it is, or am I going to shift everything so that I'm doing that next, and then just my entire routine just shifts one day. And that again is going to come down to the person because some people don't deal with that at all.

Ash Horton:
So, if you were going to catch something up, and long as they are different muscle groups, would you potentially add another training session into the same day that you've trained in the morning, maybe one in the evening as well?

Christine Envall:
I wouldn't personally. And again, for most people, it may not fit into their life. If they're already got that particular structure to have that, I guess I'm going to call it a luxury of being able to go and do a whole workout, get to the gym, and then go do everything else, and then go back at nighttime, if people can do that, then that would probably be quite fine. That normally will work out okay. But I think for the reality is that most people, it may not fit into their work life.

Ash Horton:
But it would have to be different muscle groups, otherwise you'd be not recovering enough.

Christine Envall:
Yeah. Well, they should be different muscle groups because you'd be-

Ash Horton:
Based on your routine.

Christine Envall:
Yeah.

Ash Horton:
Yeah.

Christine Envall:
Yeah, there already would be. I mean, you need to have that worked out otherwise you can't make those kinds of decisions. If you know already what the overall picture of your routine is on a overall week, then it's easy to work that out because you know what the next body part would be. You're not kind of fishing around thinking, "Oh, what was I going to do that day?" That's what I guess what I'm getting at is that if you don't have a structure and a plan, and something does go wrong, how do you salvage it.

Ash Horton:
Right.

Christine Envall:
Or you do forget and you end up trying to do chest every second day or something. So, having that overall structure and then breaking it down to the days and then breaking it down to the exercises, and again, having that flexibility that if a machine is just tied up all night, you just can't get on that particular machine, having a backup exercise that you can do, but always having an order that you like to do it in, and having exercises that you like to do, and just going in and aiming for that. And sometimes, it can be worth waiting the extra couple of minutes while somebody finishes on a piece of equipment to be able to do your routine in the particular order that you want. So, again, that's something where for some people, that's a mental thing where you need to do it in the order that you set it out, and other people are a little bit more flexible.

Christine Envall:
But the top bodybuilders that I know are generally fairly fixed on the order that they like to do their exercises because they might want to start with a particular more compound-time exercise, or they may want to start on an isolatory one. So, it really, again, depends on the person, but the majority of the bodybuilders that I know have a system and an order in their head that they want to do something, and they will wait and do it in that order rather than chop and change and do it out of order.

Christine Envall:
The other thing with that is that your strength is relative to what you've done beforehand. So, say, for example, you always start on bench press and you know that you're going to be able to do certain weights because you're fresh and you're coming into it. But if you go off and do all your flies, and maybe you're doing the chess machine or something first, and then you come back to do your bench press, you are going to be fatigued so you are going to find that it feels different doing that weight, and you may not hit the weight that you want to hit.

Christine Envall:
So again, these are things that you won't notice, I guess, if you don't have a structure and a routine, but these are things that I used to notice. If we always did bench and then incline, and a couple of times, I had to do incline and then bench, felt really strong on incline, but then when I come to the bench, the numbers were down. And sometimes, that can be mentally a challenge to think, "Oh, I've lost strength," but then realizing, "Okay, it's just stress, and my body's more stressed." But I guess that's where if people push for that weight, then they can create an injury situation because they are too fatigued to do that. So, it's a personal thing. And as I said, most of the professional bodybuilders that I know tend to stick in a particular order that they like to train.

Ash Horton:
So, moving away from the training itself, routine is a recipe for success. So, what are the other little routines that you feel are really important?

Christine Envall:
Okay. So, basic things like the time that you wake up, the time that you eat your meals, particularly for bodybuilding, because again, you're trying to fuel your body for a particular training event. And if you're skipping meals and putting them in random times and random places, you may be messing up your macros, messing up what you actually need, and then not eating for optimal performance. So, always, and again, in anything, it's about what's optimal for you. And there's always that what's practical and what's flexible, but again, you have to have a basic structure that you might want to eat between... Give yourself like an hour range or something so that you're not freaking out if you don't eat exactly at 11:00 AM or whatever time that you've said. But if you're getting till 2:00 PM and you haven't eaten your 11 o'clock meal, then you got a problem because your blood sugar is going to be dropping. Mentally, you're going to be stressing out or there's a whole bunch of things are going to be going wrong.

Christine Envall:
And a lot of people don't eat in routine and they say, "No, I'm fine." But I think when they do start to eat in a structured routine, they get amazing results. And that's where a lot of things that I've seen around the vegan-type diet comes in where a lot of people, they didn't have a plan, and then people would put them on a plan because they have to become more mindful about what they're eating. And I'm talking about people who've transitioned from being non-vegan to vegan, and they were saying how they were getting these really great results. But the underpinning thing was it was because they'd started eating a structured eating plan because they had to be more mindful of what they were combining. So, the success of the diet wasn't totally attributed to that they had gone vegan as much as they had actually started an eating plan, that they weren't just eating randomly throughout the day, that they were having set meals, set quantities of foods.

Christine Envall:
So, that's the other thing too. Say you're eating 2,000 calories per day, having that broken down evenly so that you're not eating 1,000 at one meal, and then the other meals where you're only having like a couple of hundred calories. So, those types of things, people will feel the difference in their performance if they are having a routine structure and they're not eating 2,000 calories one day, 500 calories the next day because they're all up and down and all over the place. They will find that a more systematic approach gives them overall better mood control, better energy, just generally feeling better, better digestion because you're not-

Ash Horton:
It's kind of making me hungry.

Christine Envall:
Everything makes you hungry.

Ash Horton:
It must be time to eat.

Christine Envall:
It must be.

Ash Horton:
So, a scale of one to 10 for food, how important is it to eat regularly?

Christine Envall:
To me, it's up there in the nine, eight to nine.

Ash Horton:
Wow, that's huge, yeah.

Christine Envall:
Yeah, yeah. And again, there are so many different systems which you can eat so I'm not saying that if somebody chooses to use intermittent fasting as their choice, there's a system to that, and they have to eat within that system for that thing or if you're following a keto diet. The underpinning basis of any of those diets is the system in which you eat. You can't just randomly just eat food here and there and wherever. So, any kind of diet is normally set around the structure, and it generally is broken up into there's particular meals and these types of calories and macros of those meals. So, to me, having a structure to your diet and not just randomly eating, waking up, and then thinking, "Oh gosh, I'm hungry now. I'll go off and I'll have this. And today I'm eating this particular macro ratio and just like I'm having pizza. And then the next day I'm having this and I'll be good and I'm going to eat some protein." It's too random.

Christine Envall:
So, the success that you're going to get, and I'm talking specifically about people who weight train and people who do bodybuilding, that they need to have that type of structure around their diet. And again, if you're trying to prep for a show, trying to lose weight or gain weight, if you don't know what you're eating, if you don't have an idea as to the calories and the amount of protein and everything that you're eating in a day, how do you know if you're going to be consistently gaining weight, or if you're going to consistently lose weight because you just don't know what you're putting in your body. So very, very high.

Christine Envall:
So, food and training, obviously routines, the cardio routine. And we've had a couple of podcasts where we've talked about cardio, but setting up a routine again where you don't just mindlessly go in and kind of walk on the stairs or the treadmill for half an hour, and that, but have some type of little system, little program around that. But as I said, waking up in the morning and just the little things that you do can set you up for the day. But then-

Ash Horton:
For example.

Christine Envall:
For example, it might be a little stretching thing. It might be even as simple as making your bed. Just something really basic like that where it's a task that it kind of sets you up mentally for the day and starts your day off right. And you think about it, think about the days that have gone wrong for you. And then it might be because, I don't know, the phone rang before-

Ash Horton:
You lose your structure, right? Yeah.

Christine Envall:
You lose your structure, and you may not even realize it because a lot of people, I think, have a routine without really thinking about it. But yeah, something happens out of order, and then all of a sudden, it's like you forget everything else. You'll turn up at work and you haven't brought your lunch because something happened that kind of threw you out and you do things in that certain state sequence. But you don't want to be obviously anal to the point where every minute of your day is set out at a certain thing. But you think about work, most of the time, there's a certain start and finish time. Probably not for you, Ash, because you just...

Ash Horton:
Because I worked too hard for you.

Christine Envall:
No, I don't think you work too hard for me.

Ash Horton:
Oh, there you go. That one backfired, didn't it?

Christine Envall:
That did.

Ash Horton:
Yeah.

Christine Envall:
But you know what I mean. Most people if they have the start and finish time at their work, then things fit around that. Things fit around their training. And even some of the other things, I mean, not for me because I don't have kids, but a lot of people talk about how they actually do need to factor or almost like schedule in time with their kids, otherwise there's always something else going on. So, it can be anything, your kids or your partner or something like that where you have a specific time that you put aside for those people to make sure that you're not neglecting other parts of your life. And particularly when you're bodybuilding prepping where it can become so self-absorbed, if people do have kids, then how they bring them into it so that they're not missing out whilst they're in that prep zone and everything. But pretty much everything that you do, you can create some sort of structure around of it but the flexibility does become a important thing on other types of things.

Christine Envall:
And I know that if you might maybe have five things that you always do every morning, if you kind of hit three out of the five of those things, it may even be that you have a certain drink. You might make your coffee a certain way, or you go to a certain coffee shop and grab your coffee, that has to happen before you go to work, or the day's kind of not right. So, it's something which again, it's very personal because there's different things that people do, whether it be journaling and things like that, where people might kind of write down gratitude journal or something like that as well where you set your plan for the day. So, in the way that I was talking about going into the gym knowing what you're going to train, that same principle applies to your day like, "Okay, I'm going to go into work. We have this meeting. I'm going to do that. I need to get that done." And then people have those absolute critical must get these things done today, and everything else fits in if it gets done.

Christine Envall:
But I think a lot of people, particularly people who work at a high achievement level have that thing of the must-dos, these things must get done today, and they make sure that those get ticked off, that they spend that little bit of time in the morning thinking about that and planning that so they don't just kind of launch into their day randomly, not knowing what's going to happen. So, that's routine, and I think the structure and the discipline of bodybuilding-

Ash Horton:
What is it? If you fail to plan, you're planning to fail.

Christine Envall:
Yes.

Ash Horton:
That's it.

Christine Envall:
I think that's one of those classic ones. But I think bodybuilding has an advantage because a lot of what we do is very structured. So, the diet, the training, the cardio is very structured. So, bringing that across into daily life definitely sets people up for success.

Ash Horton:
And what about the bedtime routine? I know we've touched on it in another podcast. In fact, we had a whole podcast about it, but let's just drop that in here a wee bit as well.

Christine Envall:
Well, and that's another thing and that's something, I guess, which often evolves and changes. You know, one of the big things that I was reading in that the book was that people have a, I guess, like a clearing time where they put away their electronic devices and try to get from there into a sleep mode-

Ash Horton:
Because it reduces your cortisol levels if you stop looking at screens, and a lot of people got their TV on and getting all that blue light. Right?

Christine Envall:
Yeah. And the importance of eliminating that to be able to get into sleep is very important because obviously, then if you don't, you're sort of lying there, not able to sleep, you need to sleep. Obviously, the importance of sleep cannot be underrated. So, the routine now, I actually try to not go near the laptop after eight o'clock, but again, everybody is different. Some people maybe are doing a cardio sessions till that time of night because that's how it has to fit into their thing. Reading a book to their kids that might be a really, really great kind of part of their routine. But yeah, again, I have my famous skin routine.

Ash Horton:
Yeah.

Christine Envall:
Have to look after that, but that part of that taking off everything from the day and nourishing my face. So, it stays.

Ash Horton:
I do the same.

Christine Envall:
You do the same.

Ash Horton:
I really don't.

Christine Envall:
Yeah.

Ash Horton:
But I have discovered ZMA recently, which is a magnesium-

Christine Envall:
I think magnesium aspartate.

Ash Horton:
... compound with zinc sort of thing. Is that what it is that a lot of bodybuilders use?

Christine Envall:
Zinc magnesium aspartate, ZMA.

Ash Horton:
Yeah.

Christine Envall:
Yeah. That's a lot to do with recovery, sleep, muscle growth, boosting testosterone.

Ash Horton:
So I've sort of put that into my bedtime routine and it's made a big difference.

Christine Envall:
It's allowed you to sleep better?

Ash Horton:
Yeah.

Christine Envall:
Yeah.

Ash Horton:
100%.

Christine Envall:
Yeah, some people might have a tea. There's a lot of sleep teas, nighttime teas, and things like that which are really, really useful for that type of thing. But another thing again is the sleep sounds, meditations. I love my Tibetan prayer bells.

Ash Horton:
Yeah.

Christine Envall:
Puts me to sleep every time.

Ash Horton:
Can just imagine the atmosphere of your bedroom. Anyway.

Christine Envall:
Please don't, Ash.

Ash Horton:
No, I don't want to. I don't want to. No, that's just a [inaudible 00:23:24] anyway.

Christine Envall:
That might have to get cut there.

Ash Horton:
No, leave it in. It's brilliant.

Christine Envall:
Yeah. But again, not kind of going from arguing with someone on Facebook or writing a post and then trying to drop off to sleep, it's probably not going to happen that well. And again, another way that people do end it is look at the things that they were grateful for that day or that they did achieve, or some people plan for the next day the night before. So, there are some little habits that people could start to incorporate. But as I said, it's like you have a overall super routine, which is your week or your week structure, and then it comes back to the day structure, and then it comes back to the little things within your day that just give you those anchors. So, if everything else does go wrong, you've still got those things to cling onto and bring you back to a point.

Christine Envall:
And that's, again, particularly if you're got a lot... A hectic job or it might even be that you got caught in traffic, but if you've got something to come back to, to anchor you back to, whether it be your training, whether it be your food, whether it be something, then those are things which kind of create that normality, and give people that control over their life.

Ash Horton:
Cool. Are they all the main points of routines or is there anything else you can have? So, for example, there might be like, okay, you're going to go to the gym. Is there like a pre-workout routine that you've got, for example?

Christine Envall:
Not me personally, but I know for a lot of people, obviously, there's supplements that they take pre-workout. I mean, that sounds kind of cliched, but I actually have one for my cardio routine. I'll have my glutamine, my Carni-Shot, my Complete Aminos, and I've been putting a little bit of matcha green tea in there because of the natural caffeine. So, that's my little routine there. I'll have that before that. My training, I'm actually switched my meals around so I'm having a meal, and I would like to do that as a certain time before my weight training session.

Christine Envall:
So, I guess, in essence, it is, but it's a subconscious routine because I've been a routine person my whole life. But some people it will be that they want to take their pre-workout and whatever else they have at a certain amount of time before they train so that when they hit the gym, they're ready to go. Other people it might be getting changed to go to the gym, or there's so many different things that you can do. But I think for most people, particularly athletes, there's a little routine that they go through with everything, kind of like a psych up routine. And it can be, again, just whether they stop off and get a coffee on their way to the gym or whatever it is that they do, particular clothes, one might wear a particular pair of shoes for legs day or a particular outfit that you like to wear on a particular body part day. It can go down to that level.

Ash Horton:
I feel that's the kind of thing you do, isn't it? You've got a lot of shoes. We've talked about this.

Christine Envall:
Yes. It doesn't matter. Any other body part doesn't matter, but legs absolutely matters. You've got to have the right shoes. And I am actually sporting in a pair of very flat Converse at the moment and absolutely loving it because everything else, I tried to go flat, but even with that little bit of sponge, either the shoe breaks down too quick, or it just doesn't feel right. So, yeah.

Ash Horton:
So, you got a shoe problem where you're breaking them too quick because you're lifting too much.

Christine Envall:
We have had the odd one. Don't ever use Air Max because the little air thingies just compress under the squat. But no, I used to have a favorite pair that had like a... The back came out further so it almost supported you when you went down so you almost had like training wheels on the back of your shoe, but not wheels, but like a platform.

Ash Horton:
Right.

Christine Envall:
But yeah, but that's the thing. I know people, you need to wear a certain color or something to lift heavier on chest day or something. I don't go that to that degree. It can be that and it can make all the difference.

Ash Horton:
Okay. So, the moral of this story is that routine is a recipe for success in all parts.

Christine Envall:
Yeah, and planning and routine without having to go overboard, but at least giving you something to reference off. And if you're not tracking in some way what you're doing, how do you know that you are actually succeeding? So, that's really the basis of it. If you're going into the gym, as we're specifically talking around that, if you don't know that what you did last week, how do you know that you've done better this week or that you didn't do worse, or that you've improved? Obviously, tracking your body weight, tracking how you look, those things are also part of that. But just talking about your actual routine and what you're doing, if you're not recording it in some way, even if it's in your head, then you've got nothing to reference back to, I guess you're on a treadmill because really, you could potentially be going nowhere.

Ash Horton:
Okay.

Christine Envall:
But a lot of time spent to not really be able to, I guess, enjoy the results.

Ash Horton:
Okeydoke. Christine, fascinating stuff once again. Thank you very much.

Christine Envall:
Thanks, Ash.

Ash Horton:
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