Buzzcast

Twitter Podcasts Leaks + How to Start a Podcast in 2022

March 04, 2022 Episode 71
Buzzcast
Twitter Podcasts Leaks + How to Start a Podcast in 2022
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

In this episode, the crew discusses Alban's TikTok stardom, some indie podcast apps that are on the rise, and what we think of Twitter jumping into podcasts.

Special BuzzBoost Shoutouts to Kyrin, Dave, Chris, Nick, and Eric for supporting the show.

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Thanks for listening & keep podcasting!!

Kevin:

So I figured out what the A stands for in Acast

Travis:

so in the last episode, we talked about the news that pod sites and turtle had been acquired by Spotify. And in the last couple of weeks, we had a friend of the show, Bryan Barletta write up an article, just kind of getting his thoughts Alban, who is Bryan? And then what was his idea or thoughts around study of third party measurement.

Alban:

Bryan Barletta is probably like the premier expert on podcast ad tech. He's been in the industry for a long time. And he writes in a newsletter called sounds profitable. We've probably linked to in references stuff in the past, but we will put this article in there. And he just wrote an article about third party measurements and how we kind of should be a little bit worried that those are disappearing. He made like a good point, he was like, with Google ads. And with Facebook, he's like, it's a weird position that we're in that we buy ads from Google using a Google product. And then we measure it using a different Google product, which is analytics. And then we track it all with tracking provided by Google. And it's like, maybe a google google google, google stack of verification isn't like the best and when you it also is like a little disconcerting when you don't see the data line up between these different properties. And so, you know, we have actually had to build in third party stuff on our own, that we built ourselves. So I don't know they're not already third party. Yeah, proprietary first party first party to us, but not to Google. Correct. It's a party crafting, we but we had to do it. Because we were like, We have to be able to make sure that if Google changes, something that we're aware when it happens, which has happened. And he's like now, with pretty much Spotify, buying the two biggest third party ad tracking tools, pod sites and charitable. He says great here on homework isn't third party measurements, pod sites, and charitable can no longer be considered third party measurement, or attribution providers. I thought that was like a good point that they probably will be getting better data for all the Spotify stuff, and they'll be way advanced in that area. But everywhere else, it's gonna be a little bit more. They're grading their own homework. And so it does seem like maybe there's a good opportunity now for somebody else to come in and say, Hey, we can provide one level of consistent tracking across all of the different podcast hosts and ad providers and everything.

Travis:

Well, if there's something we can say confidently, it's that internet companies and software providers always act in the best interest of the people that use our platforms. Never selfishly, definitely the people that own the platforms. Yeah, yeah, for sure. So like Facebook would never do anything fishy with your data to their own benefit, without telling you first. I mean, I feel pretty good. We could say that right? Little sarcasm there. No. So it is weird. It's like, hey, Google, say, You gave us a bunch of money, we promise that you got this much traffic from it. And we double checked it ourselves. So you should totally feel great about it and just not ask questions.

Alban:

So when we've had this issue with Google, it's not that Google's being dishonest. It's that something changed with the tracking tool. And thus, Google is making decisions based on the tracking tool. What happens is when it's all one company, they trust themselves completely. And so there's too much trust built up. So when the system breaks, it actually really does break. And it's only when we have a verification on our side, that we go, Whoa, looks like you change something in the code that caused this issue. So it's not that I'm like, oh, Spotify is gonna lie about how many ads they sold. But you just want the people who are double checking the work to not always be the people who did the work, because you're often blind to the mistakes you make. But one positive of this, which Brian wrote about, I thought, this is pretty good. It will actually allow Spotify to do a better job of creating podcast hits. So you guys remember, House of Cards? How Netflix made that?

Travis:

No, I know the show not familiar with the origin story of how it got

Alban:

creative. When they decided they wanted to do their own content. There was an original UK version of House of Cards. And then they're like, Okay, maybe we would get these people to be in the show. And they went to their data. And they're like, the director, David Fincher. They're like, oh, people who really like his stuff. Also really like Kevin Spacey also really like the original house of cards. And so they put all that together to go, Hey, this actually is a hit. And they bought two seasons on it for a really big amount without seeing anything about the show, just because the data told them these things. There's a big overlap here. So Brian kind of made that offhanded comment and I was like, Oh, that'd be kind of cool. I'd like to see like, what does that look like for the Spotify world? If now they have a lot of data can they actually create like a pretty sweet hit show.

Travis:

Well, they definitely have a cadre of podcasts ready to go the sign exclusive deals. And they've just been waiting for that data to come up with the actual concepts for, you know, the Prince Harry and Meghan Markel podcast and the Kim Kardashian podcast, I'm eager. Maybe this will be the time we actually see those things come to life. I

Alban:

may not be in the target demographic issues. Yeah. But anyway, it's a good article, and we can link to it in the show notes. If you want to learn more about what happened with POD sites and charitable check out other stuff that Brian does, he's definitely knows the space better than anyone.

Travis:

So we recently updated the very first podcast, how to start a podcast, not not the first like the first ever, but the first one Buzzsprout that Alban, you and I did several years ago. 28 2019. Yeah, a long time ago, a lot of things have changed in the world of podcasting since then. So we thought it'd be a good opportunity, with the new year to refresh some things

Alban:

we originally recorded in 2018. And then the update for 2019 was that I went and change the publish date. Yes. I had a similar idea. 2020. I couldn't do it in 2021. I was too embarrassed. But it's been now three and a half years since we recorded that, and a lot has changed in podcasting. So we went back and we redid the whole series. So it's a 10 part series, walking you step by step pretty much through everything on how to start a podcast, and you are the producer, and John and I are the CO hosts. And I'm actually very happy with how it came out. It's quite a bit better than maybe the original that we did two, three and a half years ago. So

Kevin:

I don't know a whole lot about this project. You guys have been working on it independently of me. What did you guys decide to do? Is this a new season? Is it replacing the old episodes? Or the new, old episodes offline? Are they online? Like tell me everything? I don't know.

Alban:

Alright, so this is a series that gets picked up on its own people search for how to start a podcast it was showing up in Google, it was showing up in podcasting apps, lots of places. And so it's lots people's first experience of Buzzsprout. But when the content was now, three and a half years old, a lot of our recommendations, a lot of our advice had changed. So we wanted to go back and just update that. And so we did, we just took all the existing episodes, and we unpublished them, and we uploaded 10 New episodes. So those are coming out every weekday, I think we're up to four live now. And by next Friday, they'll all be out. So it'll be 10 episodes. And we'll walk you through the entire process.

Travis:

It's kind of like if you had created an online course teaching something, and you wanted to refresh it, and you needed to, like completely re record everything and replace the old content in the new content. So that's what we did. Because like Alban said, people are looking to it for advice on how do I start a podcast, I don't need to try and compare season one versus Season Two and figure out what's changed. It's like, just tell me what I need to know right now. And so that's why we pulled the trigger on unpublishing them. Yeah. Okay.

Kevin:

And why did you release them all? It looks like they're a day apart? Is that what's happening? Yeah. So why that instead of just releasing them all at the same time,

Travis:

so that is because it is a Serial podcast, and we wanted them to come out in a specific order. We're using the episode numbers tag, not putting the number in the title of the episodes. But it does follow a sequential order. So if you're listening outside of a podcast app that supports that episode tag, then if we publish them all on the same day, you might get them in alphabetical order, or get them in a different order. So like, let's say, I uploaded all of them, they're all supposed to go out on Thursday. And then I make a change to one, it might refresh to like the bottom of the day. And so by releasing one a day, that kind of ensures that no matter what app they're in, that if someone just listens to them front to back, that'll be in the right order.

Alban:

And you could do this by backdating them. But this is our kind of way of opening it back up and inviting people to re listen to them. We could have also edited the audio, the actual episodes and just changed the audio files. But we also changed the format quite a bit. So the format went from seven or eight episodes to now being 10. And so quite a bit different. But we have more things to say. Yeah, we have a lot more to say. And we've kind of just thought about some topics that we went over quickly and people ended up having a lot more questions about we were able to expound upon. So I'm excited. It was the first thing that Travis and I ever worked on together. And so I'm excited to see how the next one goes.

Travis:

So we'll leave a link to that in the show notes and also a link to our tic tock channel. Alban or you're going viral man, going viral on tic tac nowadays we were inspired by the the podcast that had a video go viral led to like a 1,000x increasing their download numbers. Remember what that podcast was Alban? Mark, say Mark safe? Yeah,

Alban:

it was a disaster podcast. Yeah.

Travis:

So we're like, hey, why don't we try that albums always wanted to be an internet celebrity is definitely

Alban:

not true. I was by far the most apprehensive because I was the one who's gonna have to start doing it. So I was like, alright, we'll try this tic tock thing. And it's been an interesting experiment. So we have had some pretty good success, we're almost up to 2000 followers, and we've had a few videos hit over 50,000 views. Tick tock is like the polar opposite of podcasting. The content is like a minute long Max is really what we've ever put up. I know, they're gonna do longer content, but like, the stuff that works well is even shorter. But you can get massive views. And I don't think it really matters your followers a whole lot. Sure. So it's really leaning into like, they show a segment of people, some content. And if the engagement numbers really high, they show a lot more people, the engagement numbers are high, then it's going out to 10,000 new people, and it just gets bigger and bigger. And so they just give you larger, larger buckets of views or something. And so it's interesting because podcasting, you grow slowly over time, and tick tock seems to be very driven by, hey, you caught the right moment. And this one video was perfect. So we've had a few videos really take off. We're still experimenting with it. But if you want to come over and get some podcasting tips, it's stuff that's very similar to what we're putting on the YouTube channel. Yeah. Do we want to talk about, you know, stuff we've learned and stuff that maybe people could use for their podcasts?

Travis:

Yeah, well, and the other thing that I thought would be interesting was comparing Tik Tok views to IG reels and YouTube shorts, because those are the other platforms were posting these vertical videos on. Yeah. And so tick tock has a lot of virality built into it. Instagram is trying to copy that with the reels, YouTube has shorts. And so it doesn't seem like we've had any videos really pop on other platforms. They're kind of getting similar levels of us to just a normal video at this point. Yeah.

Alban:

So there is a power law distribution for sure. On tick tock, like, where you have a bunch of videos in the beginning, we got like one to hit 1000 views, and then a bunch of like 302 100. And we were just kind of plugging away. And then we had one skyrocket past 20,000. And then we had another one go to like 50,000. And then we had another one go to a few 1000. So then we started seeing like, big uptick in the amount of views, we started getting a lot more followers were on Instagram, and over on YouTube, where we already have pretty large follower subscriber numbers. We haven't seen anything go beyond maybe 2000 at max. So I don't know if that's just we haven't hit the moments there. Or if their algorithms are that much different. I don't know much about Instagram reels and YouTube shorts yet. But what is interesting about tick tock is like, these are views and that numbers feel cool. But until you know, like one second of a view, that's a view. We're a podcast. I mean, we see the numbers for Buzzcast are quite a bit lower than our tick tock videos now. Right? But people are sitting with us for 3045 minutes listening to what we think and we get lots people who reach out and talk to us. I guess we can do our, you know, our buzz corner later or boo

Travis:

boos? Yes. People are sending us money now.

Alban:

Yeah, if people are willing to send money, it's because they're engaging with the podcast. And it's very different than what's happening on Tik Tok, which people are. They're only engaging to the extent that they didn't swipe immediately when they saw us pop up.

Kevin:

So do we have comments on them? They were tic tock videos.

Alban:

Yeah. Alright, so here's a video of Travis and I talk about the Blue Yeti. It's got 80 comments. So I mean, some of them have a pretty good amount of people engaging with them. So there's a good amount of comments. A lot of them are correcting us or

Travis:

because clearly the Blue Yeti is the best microphone after Yeah, it's

Alban:

funny. It's lots of people who just have strong opinions about tech. Yeah, so we haven't had tons of engagement. I think some more of the podcast specific stuff, but we have one that's Jalon talking about the SM seven V and mentions that Michael Jackson used to to record thriller. And then we had, like, dozens of guys show up who like no, it was actually the SM seven, not the SM seven, be it? You're like okay, alright guys. Well, was it funny, cuz like YouTube, that video also has 1000s of views, and no one's ever corrected it? Is it kind of like a technical correction. They are technically correct. It was just interesting to see how the, it's different. But a few things we've learned stuff has to be vertical obviously, has to be shot so that it can be viewed on phone that way. You want to be using actual sounds and effects from tick tock. I think that if you're probably trying to follow trends and tick tock, that would be a better way to grow it. Tick tock channel. The downside is if you're a brand, you actually have to have a business reason to be there. Like I'm spending work time too. This stuff. So we need to be talking about podcasting related stuff. So I'm not like dancing next to a microphone yet, not yet.

Kevin:

It seems to have taken some time for the TIC tock algorithm to figure out who this content resonates with, right. And now they figured that out, not only of our views got, well, you would assume views and comments and interactions and stuff would go hand in hand. But the tick, the algorithm has to figure out who is worth serving this content to. And so we had to publish a certain number of kind of videos and try a couple different things before it started to figure out who's gonna like these videos, who's gonna engage with them? Who was gonna see this, and they're gonna stay on platform? And so like, how long did that take? How long have you been working on this,

Alban:

we've only been really working on it since the beginning of the year, and really only in earnest, like the last month.

Kevin:

So how many videos were at 19 videos, 19 videos,

Alban:

so it wasn't in digital,

Kevin:

publish anything and then pull it off? Or is it this is just straight 19

Alban:

I think this is all of a maybe we deleted one. But we've done 19, we really didn't see anything really start happening till we probably like 13 or so maybe 12 was the one that actually started taking off. And these were all pretty, we put a good amount of work into them, you know, we're experimenting, but we're trying to do our best job. I'm interested, though, to learn, like, looking at other people's channels, there's times where people have like one video that gets millions of views. And then you go through the rest of the channel. And it's like 500 views, 400 views, 500 views, 2000 views? And so I'm wondering, like, did we hit a homerun kind of early, and maybe we won't hit another one? Or is this the beginning of being a much larger channel? I think it's just very different from maybe a podcast or YouTube, where as you're building the audience, it's kind of your audience, and so you're more likely to have a hit. Where tic tock, I'm not exactly sure if that's true. Like if they're willing to let us get 1000s of views. When we're a really small channel with you know, maybe we at that point, we had 100 subscribers, then there must be people with millions of followers that don't have any, you know, they're not getting any engagement on some of their videos. So it'll be interesting to keep up with. But I think the fact of how different it is from podcasting might make it a good fit, like we saw with Mark safe, we can link to our discussion there about how they started going viral. But the idea that you could just put out some content. And there's a chance that it's so compelling that it starts reaching 10s of 1000s of people or millions, I think in their case, and then they everybody started coming back to the podcast and listening to their episodes. So I would just say like, because it can go viral. And because it's so low engagement that like gaygent time is so low, it's kind of a good fit for it's like the exact opposite end of the barbell from podcasting. Podcasting is like very deep engagement with a smaller audience. Tik Tok is like, people pay attention to you for two seconds. But you got tons of people who pay attention to you for two seconds, it's might be a good thing to have those very different types of content in your toolkit. And I

Kevin:

like conceptually solving. I don't want to mention the D word, the bad D word. And podcasting, which is discoverability.

Alban:

Do you are you talking about the

Kevin:

discoverability problem that podcasting has. But I do like the idea of, you know, looking to other forms of medium to solve the problem instead of trying to figure out how can we build a podcast app to solve this problem? Or how can a podcast host come in and solve this problem? Or how can we introduce algorithms into podcasting to help solve this problem? I think there are other great platforms that are great for discovering new things. And leaning into those to build podcasting feels healthier to me than it does trying to build algorithms and, you know, ways to solve these problems into what's great about podcasting, because it's sort of the takeaway, what's great about podcasting, when we do that,

Alban:

there's also a bit tuition, like, this isn't actually a problem, like new podcasts want to get discovered. So for them, it's definitely a problem. But for podcast listeners, the value is that you built a relationship with the podcast, and whether it's the content or the hosts, like you're coming back more and more for a deeper relationship. And I don't talk about now, like, I have a problem discovering new family members, like I've got the family members that I have, I really appreciate them. And I know there's only space in my life for the actual family I have, right. And I don't know, it's just seems interesting to me, we're talking like as if, if we fix the discoverability problem, nothing else will change. And I'm like, Will and people are being constantly bombarded with 40 podcasts to listen to, they're going to be dropping off of other shows. And so there's only so much time in the day. And I think it's healthy to have some mediums of content that people are consistently coming back to over and over and other ones where it's like this is where I'm totally exploring and over time you as you find out this is a creator, I really like maybe then you're checking out their YouTube videos. And if you really like that maybe you're now checking out their podcasts. And podcasts is like the one where you stick the longest. And maybe tick tock is now on the other end where you stick the least,

Travis:

or people open the app to the podcast listening app to listen to you. Right? They open tick tock for an experience. Yeah, they don't care where it comes from, which is why anyone can go viral and tick tock. They're just looking for the next viral hit. Yeah, it's not building necessarily dedicated audience. That's what people are showing up for when they open their app. And they look at their recent episodes, they want to hear from you. Right, not just whoever wants to talk about something. So it's March, which means our February global stats are out. And we saw some movements towards the bottom with our indie apps, gaining some ground.

Kevin:

What do I mean by indie apps? Non legacy apps?

Alban:

Yeah. So not Apple or Spotify,

Travis:

Apple, Spotify, Google, the big three. Other than those, we're seeing some others gain some market share.

Alban:

Yeah. And I mean, I really put this in there because this was an exact quote from James Cridland. And pod news was just like, oh, Buzzsprout podcast stats are out. And indie apps seem to be doing better. And I looked at it, I was like, oh, yeah, the indie apps seem to be doing better. So Apple and Spotify as percentage went down a little bit, and a lot of the smaller apps started doing better. And it made me think about, like, we're actually starting to see some new indie apps Kevin's been talking about some of the crypto ones. But I've been using one called snipped. Have you guys seen this? I've never heard of that. Kevin have you know, was actually also in pod news today that they raised some money. And what they're doing is, they are really prioritizing transcripts. Okay. And so I think it's for people who are probably in the like, personal knowledge management space PKM people are taking, you've been using Evernote for like 17 years, and have everything they've ever thought of written down. And so the idea is like, you're listening to podcasts, and you're like, oh, that's an interesting point. And you click it, and then it grabs the snippet of that audio transcribed, and then it gives you the transcription. It's like, oh, here your notes from the podcast episode.

Travis:

Interesting. Well, it

Alban:

happens to me a lot where I'm listening to a podcast. I'm like, That's interesting. But I'm not gonna run into my other room and grab a notepad and write stuff down.

Kevin:

Yeah, that happened to me all the time. I listen in the car all the time. And I'm like, oh, I should write that down. But I'm in the car can't I'm like, I'll remember. And then two hours later, what was that thing?

Travis:

And what was the episode? Yeah. Right. So have you started using it with because you use Rome, right?

Alban:

Yeah, it works now where I can get it all the way from the podcast app all the way to where I keep all my notes. The transcriptions are not perfect, because they're transcribing things themselves. It was either this one or one of the other apps that were kind of similarly that I messaged, I was like, hey, actually, Buzzsprout has tons of transcripts that have been edited by the creators, you should use those instead, I think they're just transcribing themselves probably using like Google or Amazon's API. So the transcripts are not perfect. And there's times where you're, there's definitely you're wanting them to be a bit better. But I like the idea of this is a totally different shift. It's not just an audio experience. They're saying, Hey, you can listen to this audio experience. But then you can remember pieces of it that you found really important with these little snippets. So I really liked that idea.

Kevin:

I'd like to see that come to more podcast apps.

Alban:

I'm very excited about it. The reason I probably will not stick there forever, is I think I've been totally, you just fades into the background after I've used overcast for years. I also tried to use Apple podcast again this last two weeks, because while it's they did some new updates, but the smart speed of overcast where if there's long spaces and silences, that they shorten it. And then the other one is voice boosts which just makes all the voices sound so much better. Those two features like nobody else has really replicated those as well. And so some of my favorite podcasts to listen to, I'm like, gosh, everyone's talking so slow. But I also am not into listening a 1.5x speed, I just want the like pauses in the middle just shorten up and tightened. So it's gonna be tough for me to move off overcast, but I do like kind of going and testing some of these new podcast apps.

Kevin:

Yeah, and a lot of the new podcast apps have features like that implemented differently so you might prefer the voice boost of overcast versus the gap snapper of cast ematic but those features are coming gaps ever gaps up are pretty close. That's a good day.

Travis:

There's also a new niche podcast app that just was announced Apollo that is dedicated to

Alban:

ways you can reach out that words that don't think either of a niche

Unknown:

niche niche niche, niche ninja niche Shea the niche, niche Shabbat

Kevin:

is two ways to pounce pronounce Apollo Apple Oh, you can say a new podcast a shoe

Alban:

but you Nish

Travis:

is not it. Maybe I was trying to split the difference and just get caught in the middle. Yeah, exactly.

Alban:

Yeah, Apollo is a new podcasting app that is focused only on audio dramas. And I recently realized, like, I talked to one of my best friend's, and he was like, dude, so I'm starting to get into podcasts. like, Alright, nice. Tell me about it. He's like, Yeah, I don't really like any of the, you know, newsy or interview ones. But what I'm really liking are some of these like duck stories, like, yeah, audio dramas. He's like, they're awesome. And he's like, Do you know any good ones. And so we were setting some back and forth, you'd actually binged a bunch of Q codes, audio dramas. And then I found this app. Apollo is a new podcasting app only for fiction podcasts. And I actually think there is a segment of the podcast listening audience that is looking for the fiction podcast, it's just a very different mindset. I'm going in for a story, I only want to listen for, like 10 episodes during the story. I don't want to listen to 400 episodes over years and years of interviews. So I think it's super interesting that somebody is trying this out, instead of saying, we're going to build some new feature that will crush all of our competitors. They're saying, No, we're going to focus and we're going to be really good for fiction podcasts. So we're gonna make sure the episodes are in order. We're gonna track if you've listened to these episodes, we'll help you find similar type podcasts because you are more likely if you're listening to fiction, to be needing to find new shows, because you only listen to 10 episodes, or 20 episodes per show. So I just thought that was super cool idea. And if anyone who listens to us is really big fan of fiction podcast, you know, check it out. And let us know what you think.

Travis:

Do you know if they have a submission process where if anyone listening has a fiction podcast that they could submit it to Apollo?

Alban:

I was looking at that earlier, I didn't see it there. There has to be one. They say that it's like human curated, but their website, I didn't see the easy way to submit. So maybe if I downloaded the app, there would be some way in there. But they say they have something like 7500 shows on the app, and the app looks good. So I'm sure we can figure that out. Here we go. They tweeted something. Okay, what did they tweet

Travis:

from the official Apollo podcast Twitter account? How did I not find this? Before you Okay, so fiction podcast did say, all right, to submit a show to be listed on Apollo please us submit dot Apollo pods.com, you can select the best genre and format text there too. When you hit submit, our phones vibrate, we run to the computer to add your show. So we'll add this Twitter thread to the show notes. If you have a fiction podcast, you can submit it to Apollo, and then that'd be a great, it's really cool to see, like Kevin was talking about the different features in indie apps, different approaches to curating content. So you have the we have everything directories like Apple podcasts and podcast index, then you have like podcast networks, and individual websites on the other end. And then everything in the middle is fair game. So like fiction podcasts, that's a niche. That's that's a need that people have, I want to find more fiction podcasts. There's an app for that. Feel like an old Apple commercial now. Right? There's an app for that. And so this is another really cool way of curating content, solving the quote unquote, discoverability problem, and just meeting people where they are with their felt needs and providing solutions that happen to be podcasts.

Kevin:

Oh, and while we're talking about podcast apps, and what's great about these new ones, somebody please who's listening to the show? Who's an app developer, please add it. I'm done with this episode button, your podcast. Like how many times have you guys listened to a podcast and in whatever, it's 42 minutes and you get to 41. And now they're, you know, making an announcement or doing something but like, I'm done with it, right? So I close it, I go on to another episode of another podcast or something. And that episode keeps showing up in my like, for you or my up next or whatever, cuz it's like you've got 37 seconds left of this. I don't want 37 said, I'm done with it. I just want click them done. Take it away. Never show it to me again.

Alban:

I just delete them. I think in overcast I naturally like when I think it's over. I click back, swipe, delete,

Kevin:

right back, swipe, delete. I just want I'm done. Just give me one button on the listening page. I'm done with a partner eject? All right. Yeah. And it's not like being ugly. It's not like I don't like this episode. It's because I you know, the episode usually wraps I don't want to hear the post show or I don't want to hear the announcement or I've already heard that like, just something just let me tell you, I'm done without having to get all the way to the second zero.

Alban:

So Kevin's wants for a podcast app, our high crypto integration, and I've done immediately get me out of this episode. It's

Travis:

a shame you don't know any app developers or software programmers, Kevin?

Kevin:

I do. They don't listen to me though.

Travis:

So that's the indie podcast apps. There are also some non indie companies that are getting into the podcast game. One that I think definitely keep an eye on is Twitter. So Twitter rolled out Twitter spaces, which was kind of their competitor to clubhouse similar to Facebook had their own little rooms. And now there's some kind of code leaks that people are finding previews of screens that aren't necessarily publicly available showing a podcasts section. So Alban, you're our resident Twitter expert, what do you make of the idea of Twitter, podcasting? And maybe what could they do? That would be better than Facebook.

Alban:

So what we know so far is that it looks like it's kind of down there at the bottom. It's one of the main little UI buttons, and it looks like a normal podcast thing, and it says podcasts. But they've already done quite a few things. So they bought his called review was like a newsletter. Thanks. People could put newsletters on their profiles. And they made so people can donate money and do stuff, they NFT sports, I've been doing a lot of new stuff for Twitter. And I'm starting to think like, it'd be very cool to see a podcast, Twitter integration, Nathan gathright, who he built pod link, and then he went to pod sites. And now he's at Spotify kind of did cool mockups of like, here's a few things they could do. So you know, credit him with

Travis:

it. And we'll link to this Twitter thread in the show notes if you want to check it out. One thing

Alban:

Twitter has is like top articles, people you follow are sharing the same articles twitter saying, hey, why don't you check out this article for your friends are talking about it. So it'd be interesting if it was aggregating all the people that you follow on Twitter and saying, Here's episodes they're listening to, you could also have a way where you can have like a persistent player. So what we have experienced is people share their Buzzsprout page, we made a little player, so they can people can listen to episodes. The downside is as soon as you want to scroll that stops playing again. And so we've ended up doing visual soundbites, which are a video file that are shorter saying like, hey, really stick here for 30 seconds, then move on. Imagine if you could have a persistent player similar to what we have for spaces that you press play, and then you can go scroll around Twitter, but you've still got this audio experience. And then the last is those actual podcast Call to Action Cards. Like where you have ever seen this where you can subscribe someone's newsletter on their profile page.

Travis:

Yes, all the time that I'm on Twitter, I've seen that a lot.

Alban:

It's a good feature for people who have a newsletter. And it'd be cool. If they do that. For podcasts. I think that's one that we're very likely to see.

Kevin:

What I do like about this is the idea of I don't know exactly what link you would share. But if whatever group you socialize with on Twitter, or sharing something in the podcasting space, I like the idea of them kind of calling that out as a different type of media and and promoting it, like you said, the stories or something like that they do?

Travis:

Well, I think Twitter makes resharing something so much easier than any other platform, like the retweet feature is huge. And if they were able to combine that with like the clips that you can do with Facebook, where you can clip specific pieces of audio and share it. And then you put that on top of their kind of hashtag algorithm of being on top of relevant topics. Like if you're doing up to date current news stuff, or things that are happening in the world. And then someone someone shares a clip from that. And then that gets retweeted, then that could leverage what Twitter does really well, to get a lot of exposure for your show, if that's a feature they're interested in, putting into their platform.

Kevin:

And there are some people in the podcast namespace group talking about using Twitter as a jumping off point for cross app comments, like the idea that every episode that you publish could have like a authoritative Twitter post announcing that episode. And then all the comments can happen underneath it like a parent post, yes. Okay. And then all the podcast apps could kind of pull in that thread and display them if you wanted to, you know, post your own comment or respond to somebody or something that you'd be using Twitter's API to do that. But it would be the home base for everything. That's not definitive. It's just one of the options that they're floating around.

Travis:

Not to be outdone, LinkedIn is also throwing their hat into the podcast game with a huge announcement, they're getting the podcasts by launching their own exclusive show that's only available on Linked In. So not quite the giant wave of excitement. But they're at least trying to catch the news cycle.

Alban:

It's just funny because they the PR releases all looked like LinkedIn is getting into podcasts, and you read it. And it's like, oh, Reed Hoffman is going to do a new show. And he was the founder of LinkedIn. And he's been a big podcaster. And it sounds like he's gonna do a new show for them. And they might be doing some other shows. I don't know if there's any features that are gonna happen. But watch out LinkedIn. And then some original content. And then another app that's come in is spooler. Yes.

Travis:

So spooler is the brainchild of a bunch of people that have had that have a lot of clout in the industry already. Yeah, like a lot of former CEO CTOs coming together to create something that's essentially dynamic content on steroids. So if you're familiar with our dynamic content feature, or have listened to your fair share of dynamically inserted programmatic ads, talking about how awesome Progressive Insurance is, this is essentially a platform where You could upload an episode in chunks. And then you could pull out and replace and add to those pieces of your episode in real time, without, and I guess on their back end, they wouldn't swap out the audio file that's available to podcast apps is how I understand it working. So like if you were doing like a breaking news show, doing real time updates, and you publish the episode at 2pm. And something happens at 3pm. You could record like a two minute update, swap out that piece of it. And then now anyone who listens to it after 3pm gets the new version. So essentially, you build the entire podcast episode as dynamic content. And there's nothing that's completely static, you can pull any piece out at any time,

Kevin:

right? I thought about it as like any place that you'd create a chapter for chapter markers in your podcast, like you'd, you'd split those into individual audio files, let the servers compile them into one complete episode. And then you could switch out any segment you wanted at any time, and maybe get as granular as you want to be or, you know, as broad as you want to be. Probably not for everybody, but like for news outlets, publications, whatever, maybe magazines, or whatever breaking news stuff. Maybe this is a big need in the industry, not necessarily something that I just as a hop on this podcast and talk every two weeks sees a huge need for. But it's interesting, all the technological advancements that are happening as dynamic content is becoming more and more accessible to more people. It doesn't

Alban:

seem to me like I don't hear it and go, this is a great idea. But it's maybe one project where I scroll to the bottom of the page, and then I see the five people doing it, and I go, they must know something because everybody who's involved in it, I'm like, Oh, I know all these people. And they're all done great things.

Kevin:

You know, this is this is content management, like on an enterprise level. Yeah. And so when newspapers started going, you know, less print focused and more online focus, they needed different tools than like WordPress or movable type. And you know, you're not just publishing your own personal blog, we're actually trying to publish an entire newspaper online. And so people started building enterprise content management tools for organizations like this, that same transaction, or transition hasn't happened in the podcasting space yet. And so a bunch of really smart people who have a lot of experience in podcasting and gotten together and I feel like that's the problem they're trying to solve. Doesn't mean a whole lot for the indie podcast or not necessarily, but maybe like, who knows, if you want to start your own little publication, someone like this would be super valuable. But there are big names. They are super smart. And I think they're trying to solve a big problem, but not necessarily for a lot of people. You know what time it is. It's time for what do you think? I love it? First time Alban heard that Yeah.

Travis:

Right. So it's a combo,

Kevin:

I gotta always have to do the combo.

Travis:

I want to do the combo. I think it's it plays well together. You know

Unknown:

what time it is.

Alban:

It's time for Where did you get this?

Kevin:

I restored my Fiverr account this weekend. And I went and I found some people who do I think they're called Radio drops. And so I found some people who were advertising and create radio drops. And we want to have this new segment called Buzz boost, where we go through now that our podcast is crypto lightning enabled and people can send us sets and stream stats as they're listening and they can boost us so I got some sounds made for us to use. Very nice. This is fun, right? It is

Alban:

I wondered, I did get messages from Kevin in the middle of the week. While you're out of town. You're like, Alban, I need your credit card number, not Amex. And I'm like what? You're like asking for logins to stuff. It's ended up calling Kevin Kevin is this you like what's going on here? Ideally, what he has a company card that's not an AmEx and you're like, Yeah, fiber doesn't do Amex anymore. So now I know what this was all about.

Kevin:

Yeah, that's a whole nother story. Why the heck isn't 5g?

Travis:

What a pain? Regardless, we have some new boosts.

Kevin:

We do. We do. We have a bunch of them today. So I'm gonna have to figure out how to get through these quickly. But it's super exciting. First, let me give you an overall update on where we are. We currently have 41,817 Total sets that have been given to the Buzzcast show.

Alban:

Sounds really big.

Travis:

It's like tick tock. For us. It's

Kevin:

it's big. Well, last week when we started out we had 11,480. So that's 30,337 new sets that we have. So let's read we got a bunch of boost this week. And I want to shout out to all the people who gave us some boost. Let's start out with Kieran from the mere mortals podcast. This 900 sets buoy

Alban:

how many of these? No,

Travis:

surprise, it's a surprise Alban. Alright, we're using the road caster pro trackpads. Right now we're doing a little sound pad. Right.

Kevin:

Let me read Karen's message concerns again, keep hearing from mere mortals podcast, as a quick aside, you mentioned that you don't want metadata baked into mp3 for chapters, images, would it be possible to improve your process by adding chapters by letting us putting them in in the JSON format, which is currently quite tedious? Absolutely. He goes on and on. And it's more technical stuff. But yes, that's something that we can look into. We do support obviously, all the information that you put into Buzzsprout through our UI ends up in the JSON format anyway, so could we give you away just upload JSON format file if you already have that? Make it quicker and easier for you? Yes, something I will share with you Team we'll consider moving forward. Alright, our next one is 3600 stats from a Chris You know, whoo, I know some Chris's. I'm not sure which one it

Travis:

is Chris Pine, Chris Evans. Chris, who's the third? Chris Chris Pratt?

Kevin:

Yeah, it could be any of those one of those three. Great segment two thoughts. One, I'd recommend a shout out to new podcast apps.com to let people know that there are other apps to stream sets that aren't iOS and and that aren't on iOS and don't have cast ematic. So yes, great word, their new podcast apps.com. Number two, I'd let people know that the Square Cash App doesn't allow lightning payments for New York residents for those in New York and other countries. Muu N Moon wallet is the most user friendly workaround that I found. So yes, I started on moon wallet. And it totally works. But you do have to jump through a few more hoops. The Cash App is much more user friendly. But if you're in New York or other countries that don't support cash up right now, that is a great option. So thank you, uh, Chris, I know. Or Chris, you know, maybe that's all I know. No, one of us knows. Yeah. Thank you, Chris. You know, 9000 SATs were boosted from at Nick, what's up Buzzcast. Thank you for getting behind value for value. The Fountain app is giving away new, every new user who plays a podcast before the first of March 2020 to a welcome gift of 1000 set so they can experience it for themselves. It's available on Android too. So make sure you let your listeners know. Yeah, I like fountain app. I've tried it. Some people like fountain some people like hasta magic. These are kind of the big two right now fountain is doing a lot to promote value for value. They're giving that 1000 set bonus to get you started. It's fantastic. And that works on both sides as a listener and as a podcaster. You can actually claim your podcast and fountain right now and they'll set up a wallet for you to start receiving sets. Very nice. 891 set boost from Eric Nordoff. Note off. Yeah, we know Eric. Yeah. Y'all blew my mind on this episode. Oh, this feels like I'm bragging on myself. Now. These are Eric's words. Not mine. Very nice.

Travis:

You didn't see this comment. You didn't say hey, I'll give you I didn't see that right this.

Kevin:

So y'all blew my mind with this episode, especially Kevin in the value for value segment. I still don't know exactly what I'm doing with that. But it's fun to send value for the value that you guys are all bringing even Alban and his noisy. lol

Alban:

we do we dress right noisy checker. He just noticed that on it. You get it in there. You totally did be clear. I was sick and was very cold. So in my defense, I didn't expect to wear the

Travis:

jacket. But I needed to the jacket is right over there on the table. I did bring the jacket again today. It could be a recurring guest. Noisy jacket. Okay.

Kevin:

Next one is from Dave Jones. Another boost from Dave 2142. stat boost. All it takes is he's talking about the charitable pod sites purchase here acquisition. All it takes is Apple turning on private relay for all the apps and charitable slash pod sites are useless overnight. It seems like a very risky move to go all in on IP based tracking right now. What do you think about that Alban?

Alban:

I mean, he's definitely right. But I've heard this cake fear a few times. But Apple has never said like we're planning to turn this on. So maybe there will be some updates in the future. But I'm pretty sure all they've been doing it for is like DNS records and IP addresses. So they are making those DNS requests. They're doing themselves so that all that's anonymized data, which is really good. I don't know if I expect Apple to start doing this for everything. Right.

Kevin:

And if I understand this correctly, what this would do is it would prevent the developers have apps to actually get the IP addresses of the listeners, as they're requesting episodes to be downloaded from servers,

Alban:

right? Okay. And the ultimate version would be basically like Apple was acting as a VPN for everything. So like a VPN, you basically connect to a computer that connects to whatever website and so no one really knows exactly who's asking for that data. Yeah, if Apple turned this on all the way for everything, it'd be like everyone who used an iPhone was making requests to Apple, who's then going out to the world to get it for you.

Travis:

So Tim Cook starts listening to a lot of podcasts is is what it would look like for sure.

Alban:

But then it would I mean, that would definitely cause issues for lots of apps. I think data is right, terrible. And podcasts would only be useful then to Spotify, who still have all that first party data. I'm still not 100% sure that I think this is something that would be coming in the next year or two or ever. So we'll see. There's an Apple event next week. So maybe by the time that we're on here, again, everyone's gonna be laughing at me like private relays on for everything sucker.

Kevin:

Yeah, I don't know. Even if they turned on private relay, I wonder how beneficial it would be for for even Spotify having that first party data, because if they don't let you track that user from like the listeners from the Spotify app, through safari to figure out what website they're going to or what purchases they're making, I'm not sure that they'll be able to do at least attribution, the attribution portion of that purchase would be limited. All right. Well, one more thing Dave. John said he's well I think said a couple things. Look at this another 1000 stat boost from Dave Jones lol here's a boost for the Alban surprise chapter art. Do you remember that last week? We Yes, let's drop in some chapter art

Travis:

of you, as a very flattering image probably should be your new profile pics.

Kevin:

Yeah, he chose a great image.

Alban:

I have no idea what this is. I think I probably was sicker than I thought. Yeah, so

Kevin:

you have to go to New podcasting apps.com and find an app that displays chapter so you can see it. It's 1034 Set boost for that. And then the 2158 stat boost again from Dave Jones. lol okay, this segment is the funniest thing I've heard in a long time. I laughed and a piece of cashew I was eating went up my nose. It hurts so bad. Here's some set for the initial deposit to the Alban space heater funds so that he can have a less noisy Jack Jones. I love it. Boost quarter. I love it. I love it. I love it. So yeah, we have to send you some cash stats back so you can get that cache removed. And Alban is not wearing a jacket this week. So thanks for your support. Dave. That's fantastic. Okay, and the last one 7400 Set boost from mere more at mere mortals podcast. This is Karen again, and he's explaining some stuff for me. Regarding the podcast host if you download the fountain app, you can claim your podcast in there with your email, attach the RSS by clicking on your own shows, cover art takes about five minutes. And then you can you're set up to receive stats from your audience. I've done it for my mere mortals book review podcast. And it's clean and simple. And by the way, last week, when I boosted you guys, I did eight to two, two, because it looks like buzzes and he put a little bee emoji and it does actually. Yes, it does. It looks like so awesome. Thank you, Karen. Thank you to everybody who boosted us, Travis hit me with some. Alright, thank you so much. Hit that last one bottom right. That was awesome. So that's our buzz boost segment and keep them rolling in. We love hearing from everyone out there. And we thank you so much for your support.

Travis:

So before we wrap up this episode is want to give you an update on some things that'll be changing here. Buzzcast. So I am not going to be a recurring host moving forward starting sometime in the next couple of weeks

Alban:

due to personality conflicts or with the host

Travis:

100%. I can't stand this. No, I've had an opportunity to start pursuing some additional projects in addition to the work that I'm doing for Buzzsprout. And so this will just allow me to focus on those things, but I'll still be popping in from time to time maybe as a special guest. I don't know if you guys want to have you back. I'll still be on the YouTube channel. I'll still be active, but I just won't be a recurring host anymore.

Kevin:

Yeah, don't freak out. It's not just gonna be the Alban and Kevin show. You're probably searching for that like unfollow button right now. We're gonna be trying out a couple new hosts over the next couple shows. Travis is going to help us sort that out. But we're gonna find somebody there big shoes to fill, but we're gonna do our best.

Travis:

Should we have like an American Idol style audition? Yes. We'll send in tapes.

Alban:

Absolutely. Send in your tapes. I mean, we Yeah, Travis 71 episodes that we've done, then we definitely would never have done it without you. I think when I think Kevin, you and Travis met in a Facebook group. And then Travis came into the office. And then within like a week you're like, so do you want to work here and like help us do some podcasts. So it's been a long journey. And we appreciate you an incredible mountain, it will be always fun to kind of have you back on here as a guest.

Kevin:

Yeah. And just so everyone knows Travis is not just, you know, high quality talent that is behind the microphone. He also puts all of our show notes together, he makes sure that we stick to the schedule. He edits each episode. You know, it makes us sound you smarter than we really are by cutting out all of our gaffes in the episodes. So anything that you love about this show is surely the result of Travis we're hoping to be able to keep some of that magic as he moves on. And he's going to help us do that. And we're going to keep having a back every time we slip up. But Travis, we've appreciated all you've done for the show, and I'm sure everyone who's listening enjoys you as well. So thank you and yeah, until next time, keep podcasting

Acast
Revisiting Chartable
How to Start a Podcast (Update)
TikTok Lessons Learned
Indie Podcast Apps on the rise
Twitter Podcasts?
BuzzBoosts